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Old 07-13-2018, 10:25 AM   #21
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There is a Linex dealer in Sarasota FL, I think, that sprays truck bedliner on boat decks. Looks very nice and durable. He uses a specific mixture to get the UV protection.
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Old 07-20-2018, 12:47 PM   #22
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Rubber Deck etc.

RVs use EPDM or TPO deck roofing. It is good with all sorts of weather, UV and is flexible given the "questionable" flexibly of an RVs framing. Some homes, especially mid century modern with flat roofs use rubber roofs too. That doesn't even account for commercial installations.

Here's the trick - it doesn't matter if you have a good fiberglass deck that's painted, got texture or teak - it must be good to begin with. Fix all the problems. Make sure the deck is sound. Then decide how you want to finish it. I have seen glue down rubber treatments. Personally, I don't like how they age etc. And if you want to remove it, it's a disaster. I'd go for painted, textured decking.
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Old 07-20-2018, 01:19 PM   #23
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I did this on my Taiwan CHB trawler style in 1998, it was a cover story in PASSAGEMAKER magazine that year.

I cannot say more good about it as it is indistructable and looks great. Note the present tense!
At the time it required professional grade heavy duty equipment but today it would/is much easier.
I did all of the prep. work and had a professional spray it on, today just use a roller.

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Old 07-20-2018, 01:46 PM   #24
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I think Charles brings up a good item - PREP WORK... I bet he would echo that prep is everything. Do you have any pictures of your process? Would be great to see ...

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Old 07-20-2018, 02:01 PM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charles View Post
I did this on my Taiwan CHB trawler style in 1998, it was a cover story in PASSAGEMAKER magazine that year.

I cannot say more good about it as it is indistructable and looks great. Note the present tense!
At the time it required professional grade heavy duty equipment but today it would/is much easier.
I did all of the prep. work and had a professional spray it on, today just use a roller.

CCC
I assume you are talking about the RV liquid rubber? Did you add any non-skid or just rely on the rubber itself?
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Old 07-20-2018, 03:46 PM   #26
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Yes, prep is the operative word.
I think that I have attached a couple of pics but I no longer have the boat.
If these did not come through I will try something else.
My experience was that pulling screws from the deck and rebedding did not cure deck leaks.

I rebedded any loose screws with Thiocol. Then I scrubbed the deck with Dawn, bleach and ZUD cleanser with a stiff long handle brush.

Then the work, with my DeWalt grinder and 60grit paper thoroughly sanded the deck, then scrubbed again.
I cleaned the glass up several inches all around the edge but recommend extending that up to 4 inches.
Then masking and application of the "bed liner" material.
I did not add the granulated rubber as that would have made it too rough for my taste, used just a bit of used blasting sand and that was more than sufficient.

I think that I still have an article on that and will post.
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Old 07-20-2018, 03:50 PM   #27
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OK, I found the PASSAGEMAKER article that I wrote:



Teak Deck Leaks

Written by Charles Culotta
Published in the Spring 1999 issue of PASSAGEMAKER.
Teak Deck Leaks A Modest Proposal
My 1981 Chung Hwa 45 is overloaded with teak and most regrettably teak decks. Regrettably because by the very nature of their installation they must leak over time. Think about it, approximately every twelve inches a screw is driven through the teak and fiberglass into the plywood underlayment. This process breeches the glass thousands of time and over the years, given the pounding that a boat takes, it would be almost inconceivable that such a deck would not leak.
I have had CC Rider since 1985, so I am intimately acquainted with her. Those of you who do your own maintenance know full well what I mean. When several leaks manifested themselves last year I went to work.
My quest to find them was quite an experience unto itself. I used a Dremel tool with a grinding wheel on the underside of the side decks inside of several cabinets. This was at the inside edge of the deck. On grinding through the glass I found water or at least dampness in the plywood. A bad omen to say the least. Since the small holes I ground out are hidden from view I left them open so that any subsequent leak would be evident and not accumulate in the deck core. By process of elimination I excluded the window frames-teak of course. This left the decks. I pulled up a half dozen planks and re-glassed the area under them to no avail.
In some places where the teak meets the cabin side I found a very small crack or space that water could enter so I used a hypodermic needle to inject a product called CAPTAINS CREEPING CRACK CURE. Unfortunately this was not the source of the leaks or not all of them anyway. This stuff works wonders for hairline cracks that are too thin for thicker products. It looks like and has the consistency of milk. This process was also used on the window frames in any hairline crack I could find just in case there was water intrusion and it was making its way to the deck core.
I inspected a number of similar boats with the problem and the various remedies utilized to fix them. These ranged from painting on a two-part epoxy to ripping the whole deck up including the entire plywood core and reglassing. We are talking some big operation.
I took notice of the spray on truck bed liners and contacted several shops that do the work. Even if they were not interested in the job I asked a lot of questions. One product called PROLINER was excluded from consideration due to the fact that it is very sensitive to humidity in its application. A coating produced in Houston, Texas by Performance Coating Specialists 800.821.8820 became the product of choice. I mailed several small pieces of teak to them for coating with hree similar but different products sold by them. We easily decided on SPEEDLINER over the others. The main reasons being the nonskid properties.
Another concern was adhesion. If it would not stick then it would not work. Upon close inspection this did not appear to be a problem at all. Next was to determine the type of application. I ruled out rolling or brushing it as the non-skid properties would be lost. An aside, you DO NOT need to add nonskid granules to this stuff. Trust me, applied properly it is as non -skid as teak is nonskid. Then I had to consider where would I have the demarcation line between the SPEEDLINER and the surface of the boat. I decided to extend it across the deck and up the fiberglass approximately two inches. That is two inches up the cabin side and a like distance up the gunnel side. This would give me a good seal where the teak meets the cabin and along the outer edge of the teak at the gunnel. Note that on CC Rider the teak deck stops about two and one half inches shy of the gunnel forming a gutter for water to run to the scuppers.
I removed all readily removable deck hardware such as deck pipes, hose bibs and the like. Fuel, water and waste deck fittings were not taken off only because access to the underside of the deck was not readily possible for all of them and for appearances they needed to be treated the same.
The next step entailed deck preparation. On the weather deck I drilled numerous holes into the plywood core through which I used a turkey-basting syringe to inject a two-part epoxy. These holes were then sealed with polysulfide. Be careful not to penetrate the glass on the bottom side of the deck. I suggest that you mark your drill bit with tape to prevent this and it makes the drilling faster and less worrisome.
In the years that I have had her I have not renewed the polysulfide so the sun had expanded it or the teak was worn enough that the polysulfide was well above the teak. I treated it two ways. On the weather deck I sanded the entire deck with 80-grit paper on my DeWalt 4-inch grinder. Remember this is to be covered with a three sixteenth layer of material so a few circular marks are of no consequence! This was a very dusty operation, wear eye protection and a cloth mask. If you have a Samson post examine it carefully from inside the boat. This is a guaranteed place to leak and it may not show due to the possibility of the water not running down the post but right into the core. I found this condition and strengthened the fore deck by use of a 2x4 placed under the deck and lag bolted to the Samson post. A dado was cut in the 2x4 and it was jammed tight up against the deck. It extends almost to the edge of the deck simply to make it easier to fit into the space that was available. This was installed because the deck had a small amount of flex with no underlying support and would have been added in any event and not just for the coating.
On the bridge I decided not to sand but I did sharpen a 1-inch putty knife to a razor edge and skinned the polysulfide down even with the deck. This left a hint of the lines between the teak boards. It is a matter of taste. My recommendation is to sand the entire deck including the polysulfide.
More grunt work, thoroughly clean the teak. Over the years I have tried every cleaner that I could get my hands on and the clear winner is: copious amounts of bleach, detergent and oxalic acid. Donít go buy the expensive teak cleaner just for the oxalic acid. Get ZUD at your grocery store. It is a powder, cheap and works like gangbusters as its main ingredient is the everpowerful oxalic acid. Sprinkle the ZUD on the teak liberally and I mean liberally then use a stiff deck brush not one of those soft ones with which you wash the boat; scrub with a vengeance, twice because you want all oil off the surface in preparation for the primer. Again, donít worry about gouging the teak because it will be covered.
It was now time for the application process to begin. The first step was masking. There is some overspray but not as much as with paint. An aside. I mentioned that I did not remove the deck fills therefore they must be dealt with at this point. I suggest that each cap be removed, a turn of masking tape be applied around the threads, screw it half way in and cover it with tape. This will give the SPEEDLINER a good leak proof seal with the fittings. Since the word "diesel", "water", or "waste" will be obliterated, have small plastic placards made and attach them next to each fill on the cabin side. Back to the samson post. I masked several inches up the post so that a seal would be achieved above deck level. This product does have some elasticity so I so not anticipate a problem when stress is applied to the post.
A primer was applied and then two coats of SPEEDLINER were sprayed. The tape along the edge of the product must be pulled up BEFORE the product dries inorder that there is a sharp line. I suggest several rows of tape so all of the masking need not be removed between coats. The second coat of the SPEEDLINER is the texture or non-skid coat.
The astute reader quickly recognizes several problem areas. First is the need to get around the deck to pull up tape while the product is not yet cured. Some thought must go into this but an agile person should have little problem negotiating the top of the gunnels and the edge of the bridge. Next is the need for a dry spell once the masking is done. Unfortunately we have no control here but painters work around that every day.
Go forth and investigate. That is it. You may walk on it the following day. The feel is slightly soft and the nonskid is apparent. When it is wet it is about as slippery as teak. To try it, find a pickup truck and walk around on it! I am satisfied with the product in its looks, performance underfoot, and leak sealing properties.

NAVIGATION INFORMATION
I now suggest that you consider a product by DANIELLO Corp. 888 370 4333 that may be applied by the consumer. This is not to say that the spray on bed liner does not work, it does.
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Old 07-20-2018, 03:56 PM   #28
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I called Flexseal. They said that it has a 10 year warranty for UV damage. But also said it wold get slippery if wet. Could probably mitigate that with sand. Or, figure if it was wet I would be piloting from the lower bridge...LOL. One gallon is $95 and will cover 150 sq ft. That is almost two coats on my flybridge "floor". But the flexible, peel and stick Faux Teak is not much more expensive and is BEAUTIFUL and made to be non slipery. And would be MUCH easier to apply.


The savings in work and ease of application would easily pay for the extra cost of the Faux Teak!!!! And, did I say, it is BEAUTIFUL ??
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Old 07-20-2018, 06:28 PM   #29
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not to argue with their statement, but I wash my rv's roof with soapy water and bare feet. Its as far from slippery as I could imagine.
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Old 07-20-2018, 08:19 PM   #30
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There is a Linex dealer in Sarasota, I think, that is doing a lot of boats with bedliner. Looked at his web site and the photos look nice. If I had been close to the area, I probably would have had them do my deck but instead I went with Kiwigrip and have been happy with it so far.
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Old 07-20-2018, 08:48 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charles View Post
OK, I found the PASSAGEMAKER article that I wrote:



Teak Deck Leaks

Written by Charles Culotta
Published in the Spring 1999 issue of PASSAGEMAKER.
Teak Deck Leaks A Modest Proposal
My 1981 Chung Hwa 45 is overloaded with teak and most regrettably teak decks. Regrettably because by the very nature of their installation they must leak over time. Think about it, approximately every twelve inches a screw is driven through the teak and fiberglass into the plywood underlayment. This process breeches the glass thousands of time and over the years, given the pounding that a boat takes, it would be almost inconceivable that such a deck would not leak.
I have had CC Rider since 1985, so I am intimately acquainted with her. Those of you who do your own maintenance know full well what I mean. When several leaks manifested themselves last year I went to work.
My quest to find them was quite an experience unto itself. I used a Dremel tool with a grinding wheel on the underside of the side decks inside of several cabinets. This was at the inside edge of the deck. On grinding through the glass I found water or at least dampness in the plywood. A bad omen to say the least. Since the small holes I ground out are hidden from view I left them open so that any subsequent leak would be evident and not accumulate in the deck core. By process of elimination I excluded the window frames-teak of course. This left the decks. I pulled up a half dozen planks and re-glassed the area under them to no avail.
In some places where the teak meets the cabin side I found a very small crack or space that water could enter so I used a hypodermic needle to inject a product called CAPTAINS CREEPING CRACK CURE. Unfortunately this was not the source of the leaks or not all of them anyway. This stuff works wonders for hairline cracks that are too thin for thicker products. It looks like and has the consistency of milk. This process was also used on the window frames in any hairline crack I could find just in case there was water intrusion and it was making its way to the deck core.
I inspected a number of similar boats with the problem and the various remedies utilized to fix them. These ranged from painting on a two-part epoxy to ripping the whole deck up including the entire plywood core and reglassing. We are talking some big operation.
I took notice of the spray on truck bed liners and contacted several shops that do the work. Even if they were not interested in the job I asked a lot of questions. One product called PROLINER was excluded from consideration due to the fact that it is very sensitive to humidity in its application. A coating produced in Houston, Texas by Performance Coating Specialists 800.821.8820 became the product of choice. I mailed several small pieces of teak to them for coating with hree similar but different products sold by them. We easily decided on SPEEDLINER over the others. The main reasons being the nonskid properties.
Another concern was adhesion. If it would not stick then it would not work. Upon close inspection this did not appear to be a problem at all. Next was to determine the type of application. I ruled out rolling or brushing it as the non-skid properties would be lost. An aside, you DO NOT need to add nonskid granules to this stuff. Trust me, applied properly it is as non -skid as teak is nonskid. Then I had to consider where would I have the demarcation line between the SPEEDLINER and the surface of the boat. I decided to extend it across the deck and up the fiberglass approximately two inches. That is two inches up the cabin side and a like distance up the gunnel side. This would give me a good seal where the teak meets the cabin and along the outer edge of the teak at the gunnel. Note that on CC Rider the teak deck stops about two and one half inches shy of the gunnel forming a gutter for water to run to the scuppers.
I removed all readily removable deck hardware such as deck pipes, hose bibs and the like. Fuel, water and waste deck fittings were not taken off only because access to the underside of the deck was not readily possible for all of them and for appearances they needed to be treated the same.
The next step entailed deck preparation. On the weather deck I drilled numerous holes into the plywood core through which I used a turkey-basting syringe to inject a two-part epoxy. These holes were then sealed with polysulfide. Be careful not to penetrate the glass on the bottom side of the deck. I suggest that you mark your drill bit with tape to prevent this and it makes the drilling faster and less worrisome.
In the years that I have had her I have not renewed the polysulfide so the sun had expanded it or the teak was worn enough that the polysulfide was well above the teak. I treated it two ways. On the weather deck I sanded the entire deck with 80-grit paper on my DeWalt 4-inch grinder. Remember this is to be covered with a three sixteenth layer of material so a few circular marks are of no consequence! This was a very dusty operation, wear eye protection and a cloth mask. If you have a Samson post examine it carefully from inside the boat. This is a guaranteed place to leak and it may not show due to the possibility of the water not running down the post but right into the core. I found this condition and strengthened the fore deck by use of a 2x4 placed under the deck and lag bolted to the Samson post. A dado was cut in the 2x4 and it was jammed tight up against the deck. It extends almost to the edge of the deck simply to make it easier to fit into the space that was available. This was installed because the deck had a small amount of flex with no underlying support and would have been added in any event and not just for the coating.
On the bridge I decided not to sand but I did sharpen a 1-inch putty knife to a razor edge and skinned the polysulfide down even with the deck. This left a hint of the lines between the teak boards. It is a matter of taste. My recommendation is to sand the entire deck including the polysulfide.
More grunt work, thoroughly clean the teak. Over the years I have tried every cleaner that I could get my hands on and the clear winner is: copious amounts of bleach, detergent and oxalic acid. Donít go buy the expensive teak cleaner just for the oxalic acid. Get ZUD at your grocery store. It is a powder, cheap and works like gangbusters as its main ingredient is the everpowerful oxalic acid. Sprinkle the ZUD on the teak liberally and I mean liberally then use a stiff deck brush not one of those soft ones with which you wash the boat; scrub with a vengeance, twice because you want all oil off the surface in preparation for the primer. Again, donít worry about gouging the teak because it will be covered.
It was now time for the application process to begin. The first step was masking. There is some overspray but not as much as with paint. An aside. I mentioned that I did not remove the deck fills therefore they must be dealt with at this point. I suggest that each cap be removed, a turn of masking tape be applied around the threads, screw it half way in and cover it with tape. This will give the SPEEDLINER a good leak proof seal with the fittings. Since the word "diesel", "water", or "waste" will be obliterated, have small plastic placards made and attach them next to each fill on the cabin side. Back to the samson post. I masked several inches up the post so that a seal would be achieved above deck level. This product does have some elasticity so I so not anticipate a problem when stress is applied to the post.
A primer was applied and then two coats of SPEEDLINER were sprayed. The tape along the edge of the product must be pulled up BEFORE the product dries inorder that there is a sharp line. I suggest several rows of tape so all of the masking need not be removed between coats. The second coat of the SPEEDLINER is the texture or non-skid coat.
The astute reader quickly recognizes several problem areas. First is the need to get around the deck to pull up tape while the product is not yet cured. Some thought must go into this but an agile person should have little problem negotiating the top of the gunnels and the edge of the bridge. Next is the need for a dry spell once the masking is done. Unfortunately we have no control here but painters work around that every day.
Go forth and investigate. That is it. You may walk on it the following day. The feel is slightly soft and the nonskid is apparent. When it is wet it is about as slippery as teak. To try it, find a pickup truck and walk around on it! I am satisfied with the product in its looks, performance underfoot, and leak sealing properties.

NAVIGATION INFORMATION
I now suggest that you consider a product by DANIELLO Corp. 888 370 4333 that may be applied by the consumer. This is not to say that the spray on bed liner does not work, it does.
I would love to see your pictures. But I cant.
Does it have a shiny gloss appearance?
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Old 07-21-2018, 04:27 AM   #32
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I just came across this...



https://sanitred.com/boat-deck-coati...ir-advantages/
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Old 07-21-2018, 05:05 AM   #33
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Here's the stuff you're looking for:
SeaDek Marine Products - Swim Platform Pads
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Old 07-21-2018, 08:25 AM   #34
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what is the best option of these 3 i wonder i would love to replace some teak on ours with it.




Quote:
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Old 07-21-2018, 05:26 PM   #35
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Rubberized decks

Sanitred.com. It is a three part product that lays down a rubberized waterproof seal. If you have leaking decks, it is a great option. The third part is ground cork that you spread over the wet application. The result is a slightly spongy nonskid surface. Not quite like the playground, but that requires a substrate of foam matting. I used to work rides maintenance for a theme park. We did several childrenís areas in the park with the recycled rubber, and it would not work well on a boat. It wears out after about five years.
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Old 07-22-2018, 08:40 AM   #36
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Here is a pic. of the deck, sorry about the edge only but it is the only one that I can find.
It is not a shiny finish but is dull like nonskid, it is no more slippery than teak and does not leak. NO ONE ever came on my boat and even noticed that it was not standard non skid.
I did this in 1998 and would do it again without hesitation.


As I said it is PERMANENT, non porous, durable and today relatively easy to apply.
CCC
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Old 07-23-2018, 04:05 PM   #37
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What I would be interested in is this:

https://www.treadmaster.co.uk/pages/...mation-glowtec

They have added glow in the dark powder to the mix and now it glows overnight with no power.

I am curious about rolling a light coat of epoxy with the glow powder over the molded tread pattern so sunlight would charge it up during the day and have a deck outline overnight.
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Old 07-23-2018, 06:38 PM   #38
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Wow glow in the dark decks? Now thats sounds awesome.
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Old 07-29-2018, 09:09 AM   #39
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Look in to PlasDeck ....recovered our trawler decks a fine product indeed ....pix if U want pm me. Definately kicked up the boat appearance significantly. A real upgrade.
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Old 10-21-2018, 08:12 PM   #40
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Look what I found... Soft sand

A ground up bits of rubber coating for decks!
SoftSand | SoftSand Rubber from SoftPoint Industries
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