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Old 10-23-2016, 10:53 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by 78puget-trawler View Post
Polish and varnish not really the same thing though.
Googlr French Polish for a good explaination of the technique.

Rob
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Old 10-25-2016, 01:55 PM   #22
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To all,
The reason for cracking is I have two mountings for thetable. One top side and one down below. I leave it top side more than below dueto the space and the V berth bed that unfolds. I’ll take a couple pictures whenI go down to pull the boat this week. Thanks for everyone’s input.


Capt.Bill11
I think after seeing responsesI will strip it down to bare wood.

Nomad Willy
The pictures show a beautifulfinish on your table.

Koliver
It’s a 2006 Main Ship Rumrunner.

Steve
Polyurethane seems to be what I need to use.

Scott2640
I’m a novice but I have finished many pieces over the years.I think the only problem is having an environment that does not have dustfloating around in the air during the application process. I’m going to tryyour process and see how it turns out. It’s just a table after all.

Dheckrotte
The table looks nice. I’m not a high gloss guy but wasthinking of making it look like it was originally.

BruceK
I will post a couple good pictures later this week.


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Old 10-25-2016, 02:56 PM   #23
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While you might find good information on refinishing a table on a boating forum, you can find far more information by doing a web search on "refinishing furniture".


One of they keys to getting information is knowing the best places to look for it.
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Old 10-25-2016, 05:21 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 78puget-trawler View Post
Polish and varnish not really the same thing though.
That`s true, French Polish is not "polish" in the usual sense, it is a gloss finish of shellac dissolved in alcohol, usually applied in multiple hand rubbed coats, using a fast circular technique with a cloth pad. It can be sprayed ,and is often brushed on small non flat areas, like legs of furniture. It was around before varnish, imo gives a more attractive softer looking finish,but is harder to apply and more susceptible to damage.
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Old 10-25-2016, 08:51 PM   #25
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Wipe on poly is available at the the big box stores usually in the paint department near the other oil based stain products.

Unless you have access to a clean room there is always dust, it'll never be perfect. Just make it your last job of the day, put on the finish and leave. If no one is around stirring up the air you'll be in good shape.

Good luck.
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Old 11-01-2016, 08:50 PM   #26
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Good advise all around. However if the final finish is to be high gloss, as per the original pic, then a high gloss finish needs to be reapplied.
This is best done by stripping and starting by scratch. However this doesn't sound like the process your looking to do.
To add finish to a previously finished piece without stripping you need to be sure no wax or surface oils remain. A wipe down with naphtha, changing the rag frequently will remove the wax. Sanding with 220 sandpaper until a uniform sanded surface is apparent will give you the "grip" the finish will require. Your challenge is filling in the cracked areas. To do this a few coats, sanded between until they don't show, will suffice. Be warned it might take 4. Note the entire table does not need this treatment, consider this spot priming.
Once the cracked surfaces are filled, two or three coats, sanded with 320 will suffice.

The original was most likely a two part poly. The two part is harder and it allows a somewhat thicker coat to be applied as it cures, as well as dries via the solvents evaporating. You certainly can use a single part poly.

Key points are; clean surface, clean drying area. Do not be afraid to use a bit more thinner in order to alleviate brush marks (this may result in extra coats) Note that excess humidity will affect the final gloss.

I have been refinishing furniture, boat finishes, and cabinetry professionally for 35 years, both in a shop in in the field.
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Old 11-01-2016, 09:21 PM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BruceK View Post
That`s true, French Polish is not "polish" in the usual sense, it is a gloss finish of shellac dissolved in alcohol, usually applied in multiple hand rubbed coats, using a fast circular technique with a cloth pad. It can be sprayed ,and is often brushed on small non flat areas, like legs of furniture. It was around before varnish, imo gives a more attractive softer looking finish,but is harder to apply and more susceptible to damage.
I would not recommend to use shellac if you are not used to it or practice a lot before. It is drying very fast, which is good so dust won't have time to deposit but at the same time if you are not used to it, it is difficult to get a nice smooth finish. Anyway I would not use shellac on a table as it is not the best finish to resist to water and even less to alcohol.

One advise if you tint/varnish bare wood. Depending on the wood grain, use a wet rag to lightly wet the bare wood, let it dry, than sand it again. Depending on the wood grain type, the grain may "inflate" a bit when applying the finish which result in raw aspect. By wetting it a bit and sand you avoid it to do so. This technic has a name but don't remember it.
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Old 11-02-2016, 09:38 AM   #28
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This thread is very interesting to me as the table on our 2005 mainship is getting close to needing a refinish as well. It's not cracking yet, but the finish is getting cloudy and is pretty scratched up.

Most of the Mainships we looked at during the purchase search (about 6 or 8) had the same problem with the finish on the tables. Most of them were cracked and peeling. I don't know what the finish is that MS put on, but it seems pretty thick.

As I said, no cracks in ours and I'd like to not strip it if possible, but I'm concerned that if I lay new finish over the old it will crack and/or peel.
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Old 11-06-2016, 10:22 AM   #29
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Doug,
As long as the boat didn't become extreemely damp cracking and peeling shouldn't happen. Only after a very long time.

Bill,
If it truly has a mirrored finish, the finish was most likely sprayed on and/or polished out after it was applied.
I agree.
And for a table top I also agree Polyurethane would probably be better than "old school" oil base varnish. If the wood is dimensionally stable cracking should not be an issue. But high oil varnish would minimize cracking because it's more flexible.

Sometimes posts are worth repeating ..
Keith wrote on post # 7,
"How old is your boat? Unless the finish hasn't stopped curing, ie less than a couple of years old, it will be inert, so once you have sanded enough to give it some tooth for the next layer to hang onto, you can use whatever you like for the new finish. For interior tables, my go to is a polyurethane "varnish". It is tougher than a pure varnish, doesn't stain with water or alcohol spills, and a gloss finish will give a decent shine. You can buff it for a better shine.

So sand around the cracking, fill with a clear or appropriately coloured filler, wait for it to cure, then prep the whole surface and finish it."

Very well said and fit the OP well. I would add that waiting for the filler to cure is important.
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Old 11-06-2016, 10:44 AM   #30
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Doug Cole, I'll second Eric's post re: little danger of cracking.

I'd add that good prep of the existing finish is important. If the Mainship owners say that their finishes crack out in the field of the table, as opposed to at corners or where edges of veneers are exposed, then I think you can/should wetsand (220 grit wet-or-dry paper with a sanding block) your current finish to remove the scratches, dulling and clouding, as well as to remove soaps, skin and food oils and polishes, taking care to not sand through the finish, and recoat.

If you are suffering cracking at the corners and edges, like the original poster was, then clean the table with solvent - lacquer thinner would be my choice - dry sand and recoat with care taken to remove lifted finishes and to adequately coat the cracked areas.
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