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Old 02-21-2021, 04:54 PM   #1
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Reattach these?

My vee berth walls have laminated pieces of teak spaced about 1" apart. In between there are white stripes, I am stripping the white due to severe cracking. Problem is a lot of the teak is pulled away and a few pieces came off. My question is how can I hold the teak pieces in place while the epoxy dries? Click image for larger version

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Old 02-21-2021, 04:57 PM   #2
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I use hot glue for those instances - leave gaps in the lineal application of thickened epoxy, then use hot glue "dots" in those voids for a quick set/hold until the epoxy cures.
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Old 02-21-2021, 05:03 PM   #3
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How are they attached now? You have looked closely for screws / bungs? Most of the time there will be screws. That is actually called the ceiling on a boat by the way. I would just add a screw or two.
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Old 02-21-2021, 05:49 PM   #4
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The hull there might be too thin for mechanical fastening.

Might have to get scrap lumber and make a frame for a set of pressure points.
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Old 02-21-2021, 05:56 PM   #5
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Have you thought about just removing all the teak and just putting a nice headliner on the hull. It might be easier to keep clean without all the spaces between the teak strips. Certainly easier to do than try glueing all the teak on.
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Old 02-21-2021, 08:22 PM   #6
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The repairs I am doing are on the sides not the ceiling and I like the original look so want them on. I don't want to look at screws on a nice refinished surface so that's out. I thought of making the frame but not using hot glue that sounds promising.
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Old 02-21-2021, 08:33 PM   #7
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Greetings,
Mr. M. Ceiling IS the correct nautical term.


From Wiki:

ceilingPlanking attached to the inside of the frames or floors of a wooden hull, usually to separate the cargo from the hull planking itself. The ceiling has different names in different places: limber boards, spirketting, quickwork. The lower part of the ceiling is, confusingly to a landsman, what you are standing on at the bottom of the hold of a wooden ship.


From Nautical Dictionary (Young, Arthur)

CEILING- (Fr. Vaigre). The inside planking of a vessel. It has also received the name of footwaling, but this term seems more applicable to the thicker planks, viz. those inside the bilge, which are termed bilge-planks, and the limber-strake or futtock-plank. (Plate II. fig. 6.)




Nautical Dictionary: https://archive.org/details/ldpd_7518586_000/mode/2up
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Old 02-21-2021, 09:15 PM   #8
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I did not know that. Learned something new today.
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Old 02-23-2021, 08:01 AM   #9
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There are current construction glues at the big box store that feature " instant" grab .

Might be strong enough to glue the ceiling easily and rapidly?
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Old 02-23-2021, 11:30 AM   #10
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VHB tape might work too.
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Old 02-23-2021, 01:42 PM   #11
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Yeah, why not just use simple painters tape. Won't peel anything and should hold well enough for the epoxy to set...
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Old 02-23-2021, 03:22 PM   #12
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Some of them have been unglued for long enough to have lost some of there shape. Tape just wont hold it tight enough. I think I will try the hot glue idea first. I am using Total Boat Thickso as the epoxy I find it to be easy to use, it stays in place and holds very well.
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Old 02-23-2021, 03:37 PM   #13
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If the teak strips have lost their curve I doubt that hot glue will hole them in place. You will probably have to make a fixture of some sort to clamp them in place until the epoxy sets.
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Old 02-23-2021, 05:00 PM   #14
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Construction adhesive
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Old 02-23-2021, 05:31 PM   #15
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If you could put some temporary 2x4's a few inches off the surface you could use these air shims to temporarily hold the strips in place. I've used them for squaring windows and lifting refridgerators to adjust the legs......they are pretty amazing.

https://www.amazon.com/Calculated-In.../dp/B015CJEHZM
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Old 02-23-2021, 07:10 PM   #16
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I have used Jorgensen clamps with the jaws reversed to clamp things similar to this. You would need to make some braces for the clamps to push against and use the clamp to hold the teak to the side until the epoxy dries.
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Old 02-23-2021, 07:48 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RT Firefly View Post
Greetings,
Mr. M. Ceiling IS the correct nautical term.


From Wiki:

ceilingPlanking attached to the inside of the frames or floors of a wooden hull, usually to separate the cargo from the hull planking itself. The ceiling has different names in different places: limber boards, spirketting, quickwork. The lower part of the ceiling is, confusingly to a landsman, what you are standing on at the bottom of the hold of a wooden ship.


From Nautical Dictionary (Young, Arthur)

CEILING- (Fr. Vaigre). The inside planking of a vessel. It has also received the name of footwaling, but this term seems more applicable to the thicker planks, viz. those inside the bilge, which are termed bilge-planks, and the limber-strake or futtock-plank. (Plate II. fig. 6.)




Nautical Dictionary: https://archive.org/details/ldpd_7518586_000/mode/2up
Well this explains the recent term 'roof' used by a French origin person to describe the ceiling.
It seems ceiling was already allocated.
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Old 02-23-2021, 08:06 PM   #18
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What is the reddish material under the white cracked one?
Looking at how it looks it may be some plywood on which the teak plank are glued.

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Old 02-23-2021, 11:27 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Unclematt View Post
My vee berth walls have laminated pieces of teak spaced about 1" apart. In between there are white stripes, I am stripping the white due to severe cracking. Problem is a lot of the teak is pulled away and a few pieces came off. My question is how can I hold the teak pieces in place while the epoxy dries? Attachment 114733

Attachment 114734
Frankly, I think the striped effect looks a bit odd. I mean the white areas between the nice teak doesn't do it for me.

Have you considered taking off all those teak strips and moving them together so as to form a planked sheet effect with no gaps in between, and just adding in more teak strips of same thickness to cover the whole area above bunk level..? What it looks like below bunk level is almost irrelevant as not seen. Any imperfections at the ends where the strips butt the teak covered walls can be finished off easily with teak stained quarter round.

I lined the whole front cabin with teak veneer because the original had been stripped out as a result of water ingress staining and damage, and the end result was great, and I'm no great shakes at DIY either. Just a thought..?
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Old 02-24-2021, 07:35 AM   #20
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The backing is a teak veneer and it looks like it was gel coated white and the teak strips were held on using the gel coat. I do like the striped look so for now I am keeping it. I am also trying to keep it simple, the mission creep on everything I touch never ceases to amaze me. This started as a strip and paint and has turned into a repair some water damage, re glue teak, prime, paint and just for good measure fresh varnish. Next up is redoing the Head then start on the outside.
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