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Old 04-04-2019, 02:30 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by HopCar View Post
Real men use 5200 and only need to do the job once. You are all a bunch of sissies! Butyl and Dolphinite pitiful. ��
Please tell me you are kidding Spent the last few days replacing sink faucets in our boat - 4 of them including the wet bar. Only way to get to the bottom of two of them was to remove the stainless sink - PO, or someone, had sealed the basins in with 5200 (I found a small plastic tub with several half used tubes of 5200) Just lots of fun
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Old 04-04-2019, 02:47 PM   #22
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Old 04-04-2019, 02:48 PM   #23
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You only do the job once with 5200 because it is almost impossible to get off...
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Old 04-04-2019, 03:19 PM   #24
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Actually I was just kidding a little. In this application where you are mounting metal to fiberglass I would use 5200. It is very easy to break the bond between metal and 5300 by warming the metal. You are then dealing with the exposed 5200 which can be attacked with a razor blade and a solvent like DeBond.

All of my deck hardware and thru-hulls were bedded with 5200 and never leaked in almost thirty years.
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Old 04-08-2019, 02:44 PM   #25
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You make me laugh! And I love 5200.

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Originally Posted by HopCar View Post
Actually I was just kidding a little. In this application where you are mounting metal to fiberglass I would use 5200. It is very easy to break the bond between metal and 5300 by warming the metal. You are then dealing with the exposed 5200 which can be attacked with a razor blade and a solvent like DeBond.

All of my deck hardware and thru-hulls were bedded with 5200 and never leaked in almost thirty years.
I inject epoxy into holes and it works pretty good.

I use 5200 for things I don't want to take apart - thruhulls, stanchion bases, cleats, winch bases and all sorts of stuff. BUT, I'm really careful about how to do it.

I dry fit what i am mounting / installing. I tape off around what I'm putting in, lets say a stanchion base. Usually I also tape off the edges of the base. Then I remove the base and drill a small countersink for each mounting hole then squirt some epoxy in the holes. The last prep step is to put down a layer of 5200 over all of it.

After all this I install the stanchion base. I tighten the screws as much as I safely can and most of the 5200 gets squeezed out. When tightening the screws in I add a little 5200 just under the head of the screw. Once it is all tightened down I wipe off everything as much as I can. Once it is all clean the last thing I do is pull up the tape while everything is still wet.

All of that leaves a nice, tight, usually waterproof install. The countersink in effect makes a small washer / gasket of 5200 under the stanchion base.

I forgot a step! I clean everything with acetone before the epoxy and 5200.



... you only wanted to know how to stop the leaks and all the screws still feel tight...

Back out the screws 1/3 to 1/2 way. Force 5200 around the the screws and fill the threads. Tighten it in back in and make sure there is enough 5200 to squeeze out around the top of the screw head. Then wipe it all off and forget it till the next rainy season.

I also use new driver bits and sockets / extensions and either a ratchet or a shoulder brace to drive in big screws.

As I've gone this far on my rant I'll add that I have a handheld impact driver and a propane torch to get tough ones loose.

But yeah, 'to do the job right' you should put in a backing plate and use bolts and still tape it all off etc. But if everything still feels tight just back out those screws and screw them back in with the 5200.
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Old 04-08-2019, 03:53 PM   #26
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Greetings,
Mr. 55. IF the current screws are holding tight but simply leaking (deterioration or lack of original bedding), you might do just what you suggest: "... inject some thin epoxy resin into the holes so that it absorbs into the wood and then screw back down before epoxy hardens." OR as Mr. RC suggests (post #2).


I would probably use Dolphinite as bedding material rather than butyl tape for the reasons of potential lack of compressible tension provided by screws alone. (post #3). I would be very hesitant to go to the extent of access panels for through bolting.


Some "Rocket Scientist" DPO of our boat had the bright idea of using a marine caulking to fill loose woodscrew holes. Not much bite at all and as a result we have several screws loose in some of our stanchions.


My approach has and will be to remove the stanchion, and insert these things: https://www.grainger.com/category/fa...thread-inserts
Then use dome head machine screws to tighten down. I'm going into the teak cap rail. 4 per stanchion base. 5/16-18 I think in brass. Brass were about $2 per. SS were about $6 per. IF I do all my stanchions, I'll need about 130 pieces so going with brass "saves" me about $500. I will use butyl tape because the machine thread enables a good tightening AND the brass insert should be sealed from water.
RT....are you sure brass will be strong enough for that application ?
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Old 04-08-2019, 04:09 PM   #27
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Okay I for one thought the 5200 thing was pretty fun. On a more serious note, this forum has helped me to reduce my disdain for 5200 and I use it more again than I used to. Specifically the whole softening with heat trick.

I still prefer a simple sealant over adhesive where a mechanical clamping is reliable.

Iíve been reading those that use inserts. Maybe I should rethink that. Iíve just considered inserts to simply be the next size up screw that will pull out for the same reason the original screw did, just slightly later. I do whatever I can to get a nut on the backside.

Anyway, I appreciate everyone here making us all think objectively.
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Old 04-08-2019, 04:23 PM   #28
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One of the first jobs I had in a yard was fixing stanchions in wood and cored boats. Any repairs done at that yard were designed to last the life of the boat. The wood/core was dried, the screw holes were drilled oversize/over depth, and filled with epoxy of that time - 1960s. Later a pilot hole gets drilled in the epoxy, additional epoxy is put down the hole when the screw is driven so the screw sits in epoxy. There is no break in the resin, the screw sits in epoxy, so the bedding compound used on a cored boat isn't important. Later, if the screw needed to be removed, a small impact wrench was needed. Otherwise the repair lasted the life of the boat and never leaked again.
Using an insert only works if the insert is enclosed in epoxy.
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Old 04-08-2019, 04:51 PM   #29
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Greetings,
Mr. A. "...are you sure brass will be strong enough..." I hope so. I suspect any failure would be at the insert/wood interface (coarse thread) rather than the insert/ bolt interface (fine thread). The only scenario might be the insert tearing out of the wood and both the brass and the SS inserts have the same exterior profile (coarse thread).

At this point I'm willing to bet the $500 saved.
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