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Old 07-14-2018, 12:45 PM   #21
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Iím working on a rent house. I wish I was doing boat work!

I have several rentals and I write into my expenses, someone else doing the work...........
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Old 07-14-2018, 01:12 PM   #22
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As someone who grew up in the South, including central and South FLA, doing manual labor outside ALL DAY long, I can offer some advice.

Start early helps and while the temp should be lower, the humidity can by higher. Many times working in S. FLA, it was "hotter" in the morning because of the humidity even though the temperature is lower. Around 11:00 the humidity would burn off and it was "cooler" until early afternoon.
This can be localized of course but be aware that it exists.

Stay out of the sun and in the shade when possible. If no shade, wear a hat AND a cover over your neck. The sun on the back of your neck will heat you up FAST. If I have to work out in the sun for any length of time, I wear a hat, soak a small towel in water and then fold that towel so it will be on my head, under the hat, and extended to cover the back of my neck. The water in the towel evaporates and keeps you cooler.

Wetting a shirt also works. Pouring water on your head/body before a work period and before taking a break helps cool down.

Take breaks. If I am running a chainsaw or other power equipment, a break is required after an hour or so. Maybe less.

Drinking water helps but drinking too much water without minerals and electrolytes is asking for big trouble. I can't stand sports drinks, literally, they make me sick, so I eat foods with lots of potassium. If you are having muscle cramps after working in the heat it is almost certainly from lack of potassium. Bananas, raisins, almonds, dried apricots, dried figs, dates, walnuts, etc, are high in potassium. During a break, I force myself to eat a little bit of food, not only for the potassium, but also for the calories. After cooling off, back to work.

Pay attention to your heart rate. If I start to overheat my heart rate goes up and it is time for a break.

Pace yourself.

Later,
Dan
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Old 07-14-2018, 01:19 PM   #23
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Florida doesn't even come close to the Texas hear, 100+ degree days. Now, one says "Florida" and there are several very distinct climates in Florida. There is the Tampa Bay area, the Panhandle, the East Coast, and then there is South Florida, West Palm to the Keys. Today, Fort Lauderdale is 90 degrees with a nice 14 mph breeze off the ocean. Never had a 100 degree day. Now, we're not there for such a beautiful day, but tomorrow in Montreal is 87 degrees and a 1 mph wind, but gusts up to 5 mph, so will feel hotter than Fort Lauderdale.

Our weather patterns aren't even the same as the other parts of Florida. Look at maps and you'll see most systems cut through about mid state. Love living in the tropics of South Florida.

Please, we beg you, keep selling how horribly hot it is down here. Help us avoid additional people and crowds. Thank you.
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Old 07-14-2018, 01:20 PM   #24
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I used to do all my own bottom work in s fl during thanksgiving holiday. Not quite as brutal. Bottom work is the worst. Wearing tyvek full suit and mask. Tyvek doesnt breathe. Drink lots of water. Open up the suit often or u will die.
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Old 07-14-2018, 01:21 PM   #25
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I know of one man who after a long run, drank a bottle of ice cold water, to cool down and replace the liquid lost but, promptly suffered a heart attack brought on by the cold water. He did recover.
The ingestion of liquid is recommended to replace the liquid lost but, ice cold doesn't seem like a good idea.
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Old 07-14-2018, 01:26 PM   #26
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whats rain?
Lol That's something mother nature uses to increase the level of missery.
I grew up and lived in central FL till I was 37. A short rain storm is the worst. Just enough water to steam off in 30 minutes and max out the humidity scale. Makes working out side miserable.
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Old 07-14-2018, 01:37 PM   #27
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I know of one man who after a long run, drank a bottle of ice cold water, to cool down, and promptly suffered a heart attack brought on by the cold water.
The ingestion of liquid is recommended to replace the liquid lost but, ice cold doesn't seem like a good idea.
That is a very good point.

Once upon a time, I had an outdoor, summer job working west of Ft. Lauderdale. At lunch one day, I chugged down a nice, icy cold root beer. I had convulsions and passed our for a short time. Scared the woo hoo out of my coworker. It was over quickly and the only thing I could figure out is that the ice cold soda cause my stomach to tense up. I was perfectly fine but it was not a fun experience. Never again chugged an ice cold drink after getting overheated.

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Old 07-14-2018, 02:13 PM   #28
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I feel for you folks trying to do work outside in the heat. I have to go to a wedding tomorrow afternoon in Snohomish. The forecast is to be in the upper 80s and Iím dreading it. Outside wedding. I donít do heat.

We get some warm weather in the summer on occasion, but not HHH weather. While very humid here in the winter, it isnít all that humid in the summer.

If it is cool, you can always put on another layer. Iíd hate to be trapped indoors due to hot weather.
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Old 07-14-2018, 02:23 PM   #29
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If it is cool, you can always put on another layer. Iíd hate to be trapped indoors due to hot weather.
Wifey B: If it is hot, you can always take off another layer. I'd hate to be trapped indoors due to cold weather.

I think many of us are comfy in what we're most use to. Now, can one change and adapt? Sometimes but sometimes not. I don't know why.
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Old 07-14-2018, 02:26 PM   #30
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Wifey B: If it is hot, you can always take off another layer. I'd hate to be trapped indoors due to cold weather.
Cant remove anything else, legally, once one is down to their underwear.
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Old 07-14-2018, 02:28 PM   #31
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Spent one year in New Jersey. On many summer days, I'd break out in a sweat merely tying my shoes in the morning. Nearly died in the heat and humidity in Colombia while outdoors and not exerting. Hate humidity!
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Old 07-14-2018, 02:37 PM   #32
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Spent one year in New Jersey. On many summer days, I'd break out in a sweat merely tying my shoes in the morning. Nearly died in the heat and humidity in Colombia while outdoors and not exerting. Hate humidity!
Wifey B: Just curious at what ages you had the NJ and Colombia times?
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Old 07-14-2018, 02:46 PM   #33
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"Sissies........Try south Texas in August. We have been having a mild summer here till the last week. The apparent temp is over 105F quite often. And yet we work in it.....for about an hour ......and then we spend half an hour in the AC at 79F cooling off. I remember my first summer in Texas was in Dallas (NorthTexas) and I arrived in mid September to a radio announcement that there had just been 90 consecutive days with the actual temp being 100F or more. Back in those days, the 50s, the apparent temp was not measured. But as the Arizonans say, "its just Dry heat"

You must be speaking of the summer of 1980 - my wife and I had graduated as freshly minted MBA's from SMU and started our new jobs Sep of '79. That following summer was deadly - you know, when the TV weathermen were frying eggs on car hoods - it will be forever seared in my memory
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Old 07-14-2018, 03:04 PM   #34
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The OP is in central FL, in coastal areas it doesn't get as hot and there is usually some breeze
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Old 07-14-2018, 03:05 PM   #35
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I do all my own work here in Sarasota. Between neck coolers, shade and Gatorade, I get about 2-3 hours per day outside before I have to cool down. Direct sun will cut that by a third. If there’s an afternoon shower, maybe an hour afterward. It still leaves time for projects inside with A/C.
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Old 07-14-2018, 03:23 PM   #36
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If it is cool, you can always put on another layer. I’d hate to be trapped indoors due to hot weather.

Well, I feel the opposite. If you drop me neked in the coldest temp on earth I will die within minutes. But if you drop me neked in the hottest place on earth, if I work fast, I may be able to survive till night then reassess my position.


I worked one summer in the Mojave desert, OUTSIDE. It was a survey crew. My father was the boss, about 200 miles away in an air conditioned office in San Diego. We went to work at 6AM and quit at noon when it was too hot to pick up the brass plum bob if you dropped it in the sand. On the first day the crew chief called my father and whined, "Mr Isbell, its 130 degrees in the shade.". My father replied, "Well then, stay the hell out of the shade!"
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Old 07-14-2018, 03:29 PM   #37
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I've been practicing. I work in the garage, no sun but not much air. I can take about 2 hours. Then it's Gatorade and A/C.

The humidity is brutal. I am determined. I will drink water and pay attention to my heart rate. I'll get it done, I'm sure. Two hours at a time, the bottom should take me a couple of weeks. Wax should be another week. At least, while sitting in the A/C and reading stuff on TF.

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Old 07-14-2018, 03:34 PM   #38
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Jimisbell, you and I learned a very worthwhile lesson. Never work for your father if there are other men on the crew. He will work you twice as hard and pay you half as much just to show the other men how lucky they had it. LOL
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Old 07-14-2018, 03:36 PM   #39
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You must be speaking of the summer of 1980 - my wife and I had graduated as freshly minted MBA's from SMU and started our new jobs Sep of '79. That following summer was deadly - you know, when the TV weathermen were frying eggs on car hoods - it will be forever seared in my memory

No, it was the summer of 1956. My first year (Sophomore) at SMU. The only buildings on campus that were air conditioned in those days were the Frat houses, so I joined, and the engineering school, so I enrolled in engineering. The basement of the Rotunda was where they held English classes and the only windows were little ones at the tops of the walls that exited barely above ground. Any paper on your desk was soaking wet from sweat.
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Old 07-14-2018, 03:54 PM   #40
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Jimisbell, you and I learned a very worthwhile lesson. Never work for your father if there are other men on the crew. He will work you twice as hard and pay you half as much just to show the other men how lucky they had it. LOL

I just corrected an error on that post, it was 130 degrees not 103 degrees. As to working me harder, yes. And it is now very much appreciated though he is gone now so I cant thank him as I should have when he was alive. But because it was a County job he had to pay me the county scale.


I spent a year in Alaska. January 1961(?) in Fairbanks was below 40 below (doesnt matter C or F, the curves cross at 40 below) for the entire month. We had to do any outside work because the military was forbidden to go outside below -40. Never got above that temp all month even at noon. When I got home (Dallas) I told my wife that I had had all the "winter" that any man should endure in a whole lifetime and we moved south. She never got to Alaska and now wants to go on a cruise to Alaska and does not understand my refusal to return to that hell. My favorite poem is "The Cremation of Sam McGee" by Robert Service I understand Sam very well.
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