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Old 05-06-2021, 07:27 PM   #21
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Look at the specs on the back of the container. If the both meet the same manufacturer specs your good. Ya mar doesnít make oil
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Old 05-06-2021, 10:02 PM   #22
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Lubricants are blended to specific requirements. As long as the oil meets the OEM requirements, it is fine.

Crude oil is organic and varies greatly as it enters the refining and distillation processes. The blending and additive process compensates to build qualities that adhere to the specific standard (there are hundreds if not thousands of different lubricant standards),. The goal is to make a homogenous and fungible product that adheres to lubricant specifications specified by the OEM.

Bottom line is it simply is not possible for two batches of lubricants from different refineries or producers that meet the same standard to be incompatible. One may have slightly different additives, but they must both meet the same standards.

Let's face it. That's the goal of a standard. To suggest that two products that meet the same standard are incompatible is just incorrect.

Peter
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Old 05-08-2021, 06:25 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by mvweebles View Post
Lubricants are blended to specific requirements. As long as the oil meets the OEM requirements, it is fine.

Crude oil is organic and varies greatly as it enters the refining and distillation processes. The blending and additive process compensates to build qualities that adhere to the specific standard (there are hundreds if not thousands of different lubricant standards),. The goal is to make a homogenous and fungible product that adheres to lubricant specifications specified by the OEM.

Bottom line is it simply is not possible for two batches of lubricants from different refineries or producers that meet the same standard to be incompatible. One may have slightly different additives, but they must both meet the same standards.

Let's face it. That's the goal of a standard. To suggest that two products that meet the same standard are incompatible is just incorrect.

Peter
This! Oil is a religion for so many people. I see it on car and truck forums, heavy equipment forums and, of course, boat forums. Oil company marketing is working well or people are afraid of all things mechanical so particularly in when it comes to engine oil, they go with more dollars must be better. Yet, no one is ever able to produce evidence of an oil failure that is purely related to running a "cheaper" oil.

As you state, their cannot be major differences in the additive packages or the oils would stray from the standard.
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Old 05-08-2021, 08:13 AM   #24
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lube oil as a "religion".... and cheap oil
As a teen many years ago, when I was more 'into' cars, working on them, friends with hotrods, etc.... I developed a theory about 'cheap' oil....particularly Quaker State Oil. (is that stuff still sold?)

Theory - people that 'add a quart' will tend to buy cheap
and it's the adding a quart that becomes the problem...not the cheap oil


So I figured that folks that go cheap on their oil are more likely to just generally not care so much about babying their cars...and by extension are much less likely to do regular oil changes, etc....
or a parallel could be folks that have cars that were not in the best condition...burned oil....
and so adding a quart becomes routine.

Extended time between changes leads to greater evaporation of the short polymer chains leaving more long ones....sludge...dirt build up...etc....


I developed the theory, I think after working on my mom's Olds Cutlas Salon..changing the lifters and cleaning up the 350.... that had many times had a quart of Quaker State added to top it up.....
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Old 05-08-2021, 10:09 AM   #25
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Had to post after reading about Quaker State

As a youngster I remember having a conversation with a petroleum engineer as he filled his car at a discount gas station. He said if it burns, buy the cheapest thing available. If it lubricates, buy any name brand lubricate and never change brands. Crude from different parts of the world are in fact not particularly compatible, and when combined with different cracking methods and additives, may not play well with each other to the point that one may have to be completely worn from a bearing surface before the second will move in to lubricate.
So for years I used Quaker State 10w-30 in a '68 mustang, even after later hearing disparaging remarks about Quaker State. At around 150,000 miles I was involved in a accident on I-95. The insurance company decreed the car to be totaled, and I bought it back from them to drive until my new vehicle shipped. Bottom line, my neighbor, jet engine mechanic for Eastern Airlines, wanted the engine for a race car. His plan was to rebuild the lower unit and add some racing components. He told me after dropping the pan that it looked brand new, and there was no reason to do anything.
Just my experience, your mileage may vary.
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Old 05-08-2021, 12:09 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skyhawk View Post
lube oil as a "religion".... and cheap oil
As a teen many years ago, when I was more 'into' cars, working on them, friends with hotrods, etc.... I developed a theory about 'cheap' oil....particularly Quaker State Oil. (is that stuff still sold?)

Theory - people that 'add a quart' will tend to buy cheap
and it's the adding a quart that becomes the problem...not the cheap oil


So I figured that folks that go cheap on their oil are more likely to just generally not care so much about babying their cars...and by extension are much less likely to do regular oil changes, etc....
or a parallel could be folks that have cars that were not in the best condition...burned oil....
and so adding a quart becomes routine.

Extended time between changes leads to greater evaporation of the short polymer chains leaving more long ones....sludge...dirt build up...etc....


I developed the theory, I think after working on my mom's Olds Cutlas Salon..changing the lifters and cleaning up the 350.... that had many times had a quart of Quaker State added to top it up.....
Quaker State used to have a bad reputation because it had a lot of paraffin in it and people would get waxy build-up and clog oil passages. That is long since in the past.

Quite frankly, I'd rather buy an engine from someone who bought cheap oil and changed it and filters frequently than someone who bought the most expensive stuff and thought they could go 20,000 miles on. Different versions of cheapskates, so you can't be too sure either way.
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Old 05-09-2021, 05:34 PM   #27
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Read the labels, if they say both are "Mil Spec" followed by numbers and/or letters it means they are both authorized as being interchangeable for military vehicles. It is nonsense that one or the other will wreck you engine is just that, nonsense.
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