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Old 06-18-2021, 03:43 PM   #1
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Latex paint for interior?

I'm getting ready to do some painting in the master stateroom of my Chris Craft 410.

Historically, there have been leaks at the windows (typical), and also at the toe rail (appears that the toe rail covers the deck to hull joint) - resulting in water penetrating to the interior cabin wall.

I've removed the old covering, installed beadboard (hopefully not something I regret!), and will be diligent with the leaks. However - leaks happen...

I was planning to use oil based paint on the beadboard - but then started thinking about latex interior paint. The painting and brush cleanup would be MUCH easier with latex.

Is it a BAD idea to use latex where I will likely at some point have leaks from time to time? Do they make special latex paints for bathrooms, where a lot of moisture would be common?

I'm on an inland, fresh-water lake. At least for now, there is no salt air exposure (though there is a tiny chance I may move to the coast some day... and don't want to do anything that would be bad there...). The interior of the boat is generally well protected - aside from potential leaks. For now, I'm also under a covered slip - which helps a LOT with maint. - but can't be guaranteed.

John
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Old 06-18-2021, 05:23 PM   #2
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You can add mould additives to paint.
I bought this recently to add to 15 litres of white gloss acrylic/latex

https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Protite-...edirect=mobile
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Old 06-18-2021, 05:29 PM   #3
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Interesting. I wasn't thinking so much about mold, as worrying that the latex paint might break down and start running on the cabinetry or flooring under the wall surfaces.
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Old 06-18-2021, 05:36 PM   #4
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Zinnzer Permawhite MildewProof house paint. A great paint it does not rely on mildewcides, sticks like glue, 3 glosses, very washable, tintable, water borne, no fumes.


Their mildew proof bathroom paint is the same except no UV protection.


BTW, most, if not all, mildewcide additives caution against using them in confined spaces or sleeping quarters
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Old 06-18-2021, 05:39 PM   #5
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I have used CabinetCoat a water based urethane that meant for cabinets that I was very pleased with at home. Have not used it aboard but ease of application and durability is great. I started painting natural cabinet but liked it so much all interior trim is now that system.
Available from Home Depot ship to store.
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Old 06-18-2021, 05:42 PM   #6
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So, home depot does "ship to store", but will they do "ship to *ship*" (or, "ship to boat").... <grin>!!

Thanks for the leads guy!!!
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Old 06-18-2021, 06:10 PM   #7
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In the boat the paint will live a much tougher life than in a house. I use a quality marine paint inside the boat, something like Interlux Brightside. Yes it is more work but it wears like iron.
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Old 06-18-2021, 06:32 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Comodave View Post
In the boat the paint will live a much tougher life than in a house. .
Seems you haven't had to deal with tenants before.
I have things that last decades that tenants manage to kill off in a year.

Aside from that, the beauty of acrylic is ease of repair and repaint vs enamel or others.
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Old 06-18-2021, 08:08 PM   #9
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Pettit Cabincoat is latex paint. A 'marine" type meant for boat interiors. It doesn't say latex on the can or advertising, but it sure looks, acts, and smells like regular latex house paint. Water clean up too. I started the interior paint job on my sailboat with it, and when I ran out I went to Home Depot and had them match the color in their best latex "bathroom & kitchen" paint. At about half the cost. It's been about ten years now and both are holding up really well. No peeling or visible degradation at all.
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Old 06-18-2021, 08:25 PM   #10
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I`m no paint technologist, but I was advised,after dampworks on the walls of a building, to use plastic paints,not oil pants, on walls with fresh render. Reason given was the walls and render were still giving off moisture which oil paint would trap and plastic would allow to escape.
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Old 06-19-2021, 07:26 AM   #11
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We used Behr acrylic latex paint over Kilz primer. Our 2 cabins, pilot house, salon, and head were all painted from the factory over plywood. We never had any problems with paint adhering on a 34 year old boat.
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Old 06-19-2021, 07:37 AM   #12
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I repeat myself..

Do not use ANYTHING you can buy at Home Depot or Lowes, etc on your boat!

If it is not marine quality, don't use it.

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Old 06-19-2021, 09:15 AM   #13
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I forgot to mention, for application, I use a 4 or 6” foam varnish roller. Probably the smoothest finish you’re going to get other than spraying. Works well with the acrylic latex enamels. I cut the corners and edges in first. You can easily do two coats in a day.
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Old 06-19-2021, 10:40 AM   #14
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Paint technology continues to evolve.
Several years ago, so perhaps the technology has improved, I did a comparative recoat of my saloon with one side in oil based varnish and the other in the water based Varathane "Diamond coat". Within a year the water based stuff had acquired water marks wherever any condensation accumulated, while the oil based varnish shed all condensation without pause.
It took considerable effort to remove that hard coating, but I persevered and re-did those areas with the oil based varnish, to restore a durable, good looking finish that matches the other side of the saloon.
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Old 06-19-2021, 11:22 AM   #15
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I used oil-based and latex paint on my trawler, both tinted Grand Banks beige. In the end, I preferred the flexibility of the latex as well as its ease of use. Mold, even here in Florida, was never an issue because I kept the boat properly aired out and/or dehumidified, but you can get the base white latex in anti-mold formulations and tint to your desire.
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Old 06-19-2021, 12:21 PM   #16
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We use a latex semi-gloss paint from ACE hardware to match whatever latex semi-gloss the PO used and don't have any complaints about it's durability. Some of the paint on the walls (& even in the shower) is at least 10 years old and it still looks fine.
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Old 06-19-2021, 02:43 PM   #17
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I have used brown self priming gloss latex on exterior timber rails on ours
It's seen 5 years of sub tropical sun and rain and is holding up fine

Based on that ease of application and longevity I am about to paint the cabin sides and eaves with a foam roller in a gloss white version of same with anti mould additive added.

All non marine and purchased from the Australian version of Home Depot/Lowes
The paint doesn't care who sells it and it can't distinguish between a rail on a boat and a rail on a house - they both see the same sun and rain.
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Old 06-26-2021, 12:28 AM   #18
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$0.02 Worth

Oil based (alkyd resin) paints are tried and true. This is actually a polyester based chemistry that crosslinks to a very tight film and thus good resistance to water penetration. With that said, it is also a very hard film which isn't as forgiving to a substrate's expansion/contraction due to temperature and humidity changes.

As mentioned earlier, the latex resin technologies are rapidly evolving. The newer "high scrub resistance" interior and exterior paints are typically using these newer resins which use smaller latex particle sizes and lower surfactant content. The smaller latex size allows a "tighter" and more uniform film to form and the lower surfactant significantly increases the water resistance.

The algicide/fungicide chemistries typically used in paint are designed to leach out of the paint surface at a controlled rate. The same mechanism by which our bottom paints are effective. There are some water based paints that utilize zinc oxide in their formulation. The zinc oxide has multiple purposes, it can act as a latex crosslinker providing a tougher/tighter film and it acts as a fungicide (mildew killer) that doesn't leach out.

Just some ramblings from the local village idiot
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