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Old 09-21-2020, 10:14 AM   #21
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I see the situation now, thanks for the larger photo.

Is that raised area (painted black) not already metal? It kind of looks like part of the shaft long in the photo. Wouldn't that be bronze or similar?

If so, what about filling any "extra" hole that goes into the fiberglass (as outlined in prior post), and then tapping the bronze for a stud. Then put the zinc over the stud and tighten a nut/lockwasher.

Or.... how are these usually done? I can't imagine just screwing into fiberglass each time (even though I have had good luck tapping structurally thickened epoxy, I wouldn't do it for something that needed to be taken in and out on a regular basis).

I guess I don't know how these are done normally, but I can't see "screwing" into fiberglass every time you change an anode.
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Old 09-21-2020, 10:33 AM   #22
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I don't believe there's much weight or tension on this hole that is made for keeping a zinc in place. So the JB will have the strength you need. Just pack in moderate size pieces and compress into place with a dowel or similar tool. Once hardened, you can drill it and install the bolt. Be sure that there is a wire going from the zinc to the cutter device for proper protection.

You might try installing the bolt with a washer, headfirst into the hole and pack the JB around it. The bolt will likely be more permanent this way. Cheers.
Your last idea is a good one. Just use a release agent on the bolt. Like mineral spirits.

Molded threads may be easier than tapped threads in this case.
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Old 09-21-2020, 10:56 AM   #23
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Lag bolt in skeg.

I am looking to fill he FRP material on which the bracket is held. I would rather leave the bracket in place rather than take it off. The bracket is stainless steel. No corrosion is evident on the stainless.

I intend to drill and tap the stainless and fill the FRP material behind it. As I mentioned I tried the thickened epoxy route and was not successful. Perhaps too thick.
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Old 09-21-2020, 12:11 PM   #24
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I am looking to fill he FRP material on which the bracket is held. I would rather leave the bracket in place rather than take it off. The bracket is stainless steel. No corrosion is evident on the stainless.

I intend to drill and tap the stainless and fill the FRP material behind it. As I mentioned I tried the thickened epoxy route and was not successful. Perhaps too thick.
Ah. Carry on then. Interlux Watertite would be my choice. Only because I already have some. JB Weld would be fine.

I have used JB weld in a turbulent, abrasive, hot, contaminated water application in industry (in a pinch, not by specification) and it was still fine after several years.

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Old 09-21-2020, 05:11 PM   #25
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Is tapping the next tap size out of the question?
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Old 09-21-2020, 05:34 PM   #26
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Is tapping the next tap size out of the question?



This is the route I would go.


Most keels are a slurry of resin and other material for strength.


I would just go up one size, retap at least a couple inches deep if possible, and use a threaded rod smeared with epoxy.


That's how my cutlass carrier is installed for the shaft....this isn't resisting much pull.
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Old 09-21-2020, 07:20 PM   #27
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Read post 23.

He IS going to drill and tap the SS.

He needs a solution for the hole in the fiberglass behind the hole in the SS created by the PO sticking a lag bolt in there.

Silly PO.
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Old 09-21-2020, 07:30 PM   #28
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You might try a piece of all thread and epoxy it into the hole and then put a nut on the all thread to hold the bracket on. If the hole is 5/16” you could use a 5/16” all thread and slather it with thickened epoxy and then insert into hole and let it harden. That way you would be glueing the all thread in and not using a tap to thread the epoxy. I think that the all thread will glue in pretty securely. Clean the all thread with some acetone or similar before glueing it in.
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Old 09-21-2020, 07:52 PM   #29
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Yes, I “attempted” to tap the stainless after drilling with 3/8” bit and 7/16” tap. Broke the tap off in the material GRRRR! The happy ending (for today) is I was able to back the broken tap out with a hammer and screw driver. Still have to finish tapping.

Be kind! It was my first attempt every at using a tap.

I got a cylinder of epoxy putty from Industrial Plastics and will use that to fill the FRP behind the plate.
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Old 09-21-2020, 08:16 PM   #30
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JD you mention it was your first attempt to use a tap. I broke one the first time also. I learned you have to stop and turn the tap backward when ever you feel resistance. This can be quite often, like every 1/4 or 1/2 turn of the tap. You will feel the chip break off when you reverse the turn. When the chip breaks you can go forward again. Oil helps too.
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Old 09-21-2020, 08:17 PM   #31
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Stainless Steel work hardens. Use lots of lube and go slow. If you drilled it without lube it probably hardened right up.

You are not the first one to break a tap off in SS.

Bugger.

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Old 09-21-2020, 09:14 PM   #32
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I have filled holes with thickened epoxy succesfully.
As already described by Frosty. Raw epoxy into the hole from a syringe through a piece of tape. I poke a small hole in the tape at the top of the hole for air release, then filled the cavity from the bottom with a syringe. That pushed the air out. The needle was pushed in as far as the needle length would allow.

If the hole is opening downwards then the top hole may need a helper with a second syringe to vacuum the air out as you push the epoxy in. Allow the raw epoxy to soak into the substrate for a couple minutes and then suck the excess out.

Follow the same procedure with thickened epoxy. Once filled then cover the holes with tape to hold the mix in untill it sets up.
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Old 09-22-2020, 06:26 AM   #33
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Read post 23.

He IS going to drill and tap the SS.

He needs a solution for the hole in the fiberglass behind the hole in the SS created by the PO sticking a lag bolt in there.

Silly PO.
I am suggesting drilling (if need be) and tapping the glass (resin mixture) behind the stainless , along with epoxy for good measure to glue in threaded rod.

No need to tap the stainless, just drill it out to fit over whatever sized rod used.
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Old 09-22-2020, 10:00 AM   #34
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I know what I did wrong with the taping process. My machinist friend mentioned he often used a crescent wrench. I was having trouble accessing the tap handle so I switched to a suitable wrench. I thought by being careful I would be okay. But it snapped. The welder in the yard said that taps most often break from uneven “side” forces, ie, with only using one side of the tap handle. He said he’d broken many taps over the years. It happens. Fortunately, in my case there was enough of the tap exposed above the material to back it out.

So I’ll get another 7/16” tap and continue the job.

I was just a poor office boy in my former life. Shop teachers scared me in high school. Now with the boat and limited funds to go the full service route, I find that I’m routinely doing metal work, wood work and “trickles”.

Jim.
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Old 09-22-2020, 10:32 AM   #35
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I know what I did wrong with the taping process. My machinist friend mentioned he often used a crescent wrench. I was having trouble accessing the tap handle so I switched to a suitable wrench. I thought by being careful I would be okay. But it snapped. The welder in the yard said that taps most often break from uneven “side” forces, ie, with only using one side of the tap handle. He said he’d broken many taps over the years. It happens. Fortunately, in my case there was enough of the tap exposed above the material to back it out.

So I’ll get another 7/16” tap and continue the job.

I was just a poor office boy in my former life. Shop teachers scared me in high school. Now with the boat and limited funds to go the full service route, I find that I’m routinely doing metal work, wood work and “trickles”.

Jim.
Sounds like you’re doing a fine job. I’ve broken plenty of taps over the years. Keep up the good work. Nice boat by the way.
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Old 09-22-2020, 10:53 AM   #36
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if you want the hole filled completely I would try filling the bottom as much as possible with thickened epoxy. then push a g10 or other grp rod about an 1/8 smaller than the hole in it should push any air out back up the sides of the rod. you could cut the rod off flush after it that.
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Old 09-22-2020, 12:00 PM   #37
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... fill... the bottom as much as possible with thickened epoxy. then push a g10 or other grp rod about an 1/8 smaller than the hole in it should push any air out back up the sides of the rod
That's an idea I'm going to add to my epoxy playbook -- thanks
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Old 09-22-2020, 12:45 PM   #38
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I know what I did wrong with the taping process. My machinist friend mentioned he often used a crescent wrench. I was having trouble accessing the tap handle so I switched to a suitable wrench. I thought by being careful I would be okay. But it snapped. The welder in the yard said that taps most often break from uneven “side” forces, ie, with only using one side of the tap handle. He said he’d broken many taps over the years. It happens. Fortunately, in my case there was enough of the tap exposed above the material to back it out.

So I’ll get another 7/16” tap and continue the job.

I was just a poor office boy in my former life. Shop teachers scared me in high school. Now with the boat and limited funds to go the full service route, I find that I’m routinely doing metal work, wood work and “trickles”.

Jim.
In stainless steel I would use a made in the US, TiN coated tap and SS-spec tapping lube.
It will cost more but maybe less than buying 2 cheaper ones.
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Old 09-22-2020, 12:58 PM   #39
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Necessity has made many of us push our comfort zone regarding boat work. Two things I will pass along to you. 1) stainless steel is very difficult to drill and cut because it's very hard, but when saltwater is involved, it holds up well 2) saltwater corrodes any metal with iron in it. Things don't come apart easily and benefit from penetrating fluid soak before attempted disassembly. Things will still break, sometimes creating huge issues. Slow and easy does it. You're doing well. Cheers.
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Old 09-22-2020, 01:39 PM   #40
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Success with the tap! I took more care this time. Jim the machinist believed it was a low quality tap. He provided a higher quality one this time. I was lucky I think that I was able extract the broken tap yesterday. I will clean out the hole in the FRP material behind it with acetone to remove any cutting oil.

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