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Old 07-18-2021, 11:12 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by JDCAVE View Post
There was an earlier thread on this so search around. Iím on limited 3G so really canít search. The Head Mistress has some good advice on this topic. I used 4 gallons of bleach to 350 gallons of tankage for 4 hours. Thatís on the strong side. You need to run it through all the taps but not the hot water tank. Remove the diffusers from the faucets. Then of course you need to fully drain the tanks and fill and run that water out. It takes me the better part of a day to complete the task.

If you do this once a year and have carbon filters on the system, you will find the water is as good or better than bottled.

But search for that thread. Lots of info.

Jim


How big is your boat if your fresh water tank is 350 gallons?
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Old 07-18-2021, 02:17 PM   #22
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Everyone has there own thoughts on this topic.
I just use fill my tanks with Adelaide tap water then use it for showers, washing and drinking. I try to use up each tank completely every month at least, before refilling.
No filters, bleaches or other treatment. If I want bottled water I fill a bottle from the tap and put it in the fridge. It tastes great. No reason to complicate it unless you a filling with bad tap water.
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Old 07-18-2021, 02:34 PM   #23
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Having an old uncleanable fiberglass tank

When I bought my 1981 Marine Trader in 2007 its main water tank was a fiberglass holding tank that was under the queen bed in the aft cabin of about 250 gallons. It was also insulated with foam insulation. There was no way to clean it. It is used only for washing and showering. We bring bottled water for drinking. Lately it has been very difficult to find fresh water in the Gulf Islands. Some marinas are shutting off their water taps or having one tap only and restricting water usage.

Now that I am fully retired I am thinking of installing a dedicated drinking water day tank directly under the kitchen sink of about 60 liters made of polypropylene. There would be a deck fill using a standard water fill plate, a pull out spray nozzle right by the sink and it could drain into the bilge during cold weather if I am away from the boat in the winter.

The expensive part would be buying a portable Rainmaker osmosis water maker so I would be fully independent.

Do any of you guys have a separate day tank for drinking water?
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Old 07-18-2021, 03:40 PM   #24
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Originally Posted by grahamdouglass View Post

Do any of you guys have a separate day tank for drinking water?

Yes, I do. 45 gallon with separate fill and filtration.
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Old 07-21-2021, 07:59 PM   #25
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Note: You can buy a Zero Water pitcher type filter for drinking water, coffee tea ect. Cost about $25. It really does produce 0 ppm water. No need to carry bottled water and no need to worry about "tank taste". It comes with a tester. When water gets to 5ppm replace filter.
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Old 08-09-2021, 06:46 PM   #26
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I can attest to much of what was said with a few caveots. First of all chlorine and alum tanks don't get along. Our water tank developed little pin hole leaks over time. we now have a custom fabricated poly tank by duraweld and boy is it nice. at our marina we use dock water to fill our tank with no additives. usually once a year I do the bleach shock treatment and a long flush. we also have a drinking water filter fro drinking water and a uv filter on the tank water and one on the discharge side of the watermaker. Our water never tastes funky and we run thru it fairly quickly.
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Old 08-10-2021, 06:20 AM   #27
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I don't understand the reluctance to drink from a boat's potable water system. This is the very definition of "potable water". Yes, if it's been neglected or filled with bad water, you might have to clean it up a bit. People mentioned Peggie Hall's book and that is a very good resource for how to clean a boat's potable water system and how to keep it clean.

We have been drinking, cooking ,showering and cleaning from our boat's potable water system since we bought it in 2008 with no issues. We make sure we put nothing but good, clean, treated water in and we add an once or two of chlorine bleach to each tank if we are unsure about the water. If a marina's water smells, we won't put it in our tanks, but even this would pass in time.

It's important to use only a "drinking water safe" hose to fill the tanks, to let the water run for a few minutes before beginning to fill the tanks and to never leave the hose out on the dock where a dock neighbor could use it to wash his boat or rinse out his holding tank.

It is expensive, inconvenient and wasteful to buy, transport and drink bottled water and once you have drunk it, you have to responsibly dispose of the plastic waste (empty bottles). Even if you think you are being "green" by putting them in a recycle container, you are contributing to pollution. There are many legitimate uses for plastic, but single use water bottles is not one of them.

Flush out your system, "shock" it with bleach, being sure to get the bleach solution not only in the tank, but in all the water lines, rinse and then fill your tanks with clean treated water and use it like you would use water at your home or business. Have it tested by the county health department if you are still worried about it.

BTW: If I offer you a bottle of water from my boat, it will have been filled from the boat's potable water system. We keep a few water bottles and refill them a few dozen times before discarding them.
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Old 08-10-2021, 06:58 AM   #28
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A very small % of my water supply is actually used for drinking. For that I like to buy gallon jugs of spring water. Very inexpensive and a few gallons lasts quite a while. I do drink from the water tanks occasionally and don't worry about it. I also like to have the bottled water as emergency use if I run the tank dry. My capacity is only 40 gal, but if I have a few gallons of bottled water as backup, it can get me through until I can re-fill.
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Old 08-10-2021, 08:32 AM   #29
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Can I add some comments, as my company does AWWA (American Water Works Association) sterilization of water lines for schools, hospitals, nursing homes, etc.? Just trying to dispel some misconceptions....

1. The AWWA procedure calls for 100 ppm of chlorine for 3 hours. That equates to about 1 quart of Clorox per 100 gallons of water. Run to all fixtures, let sit 3 hours, then flush. We've done this procedure hundreds of times followed by multiple sampling for E. coli and have never once found a positive E. coli result.

2. I don't like the vinegar idea. Tap water usually contains very little organic material, so it doesn't support the growth of much bacteria. Bacteria need organic material to grow. Vinegar is an organic acid (acetic acid, CH3COOH). Vinegar will not kill bacteria at low doses, but it can add enough carbon to promote bacteria growth over time.

3. The ZeroWater system might remove dissolved solids (TDS) down to zero ppm, but that has nothing to do with bacteria, etc. It does not remove bacteria, just dissolved minerals. I personally think drinking water with zero minerals is not great, but do as you see fit.

4. Filtration (unless rated at less than 0.4 microns) will not remove bacteria. It makes people feel good that they filtered their water, but it doesn't remove heavy metals or bacteria. A 0.4 micron filter will not flow much water, nor will it kill any bacteria downstream. A carbon filter removes taste, but it also removes chlorine from the tap water, so I don't use carbon filters. I'm more concerned about nasty bugs (bacteria) than taste, quite frankly.

5. Chlorine contact with aluminum is potentially corrosive, so make sure not to overdo the 1 quart of chlorine per 100 gallons, and don't chlorinate too often. It's even corrosive to stainless steel, but not significant for short contact times like the 3 hour procedure.

If it were me, for non-drinking water tanks, I'd chlorinate once, then add small amounts of chlorine every few weeks if the water starts smelling a bit.
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Old 08-10-2021, 09:10 AM   #30
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Our previous boat had a UV fresh water sterilization system (12 VDC) installed by the previous owner just after the pump and charcoal filter. It worked very well and we always had good tasting water.

https://www.buyultraviolet.com/might...fiers-3-20-gpm

This would be an option for someone looking for additional comfort about bacteria in the water supply, but it shouldn't replace the other good advice mentioned here.
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Old 08-10-2021, 09:17 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by H2O_Doc View Post
Can I add some comments, as my company does AWWA (American Water Works Association) sterilization of water lines for schools, hospitals, nursing homes, etc.? Just trying to dispel some misconceptions....

1. The AWWA procedure calls for 100 ppm of chlorine for 3 hours. That equates to about 1 quart of Clorox per 100 gallons of water. Run to all fixtures, let sit 3 hours, then flush. We've done this procedure hundreds of times followed by multiple sampling for E. coli and have never once found a positive E. coli result.
That is pretty much the same procedure we used to use when we had a residential well with a submersible pump after the pump and pipe had been pulled for maintenance or replacement. Dump a gallon of bleach down the well, run each fixture until we could smell the bleach and then let it sit overnight. Flush each fixture the next day until the smell was gone or tolerable.

Anyone who has used water from a residential well for some time will smell chlorine when using treated city water but will soon get used to it and not notice the smell.
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Old 08-15-2021, 10:54 PM   #32
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We drink the water from our tanks. Once in a while I will add a tablespoon of bleach as needed.
I found years ago, after having to clean my tanks, that filtering the water helps a lot. If junk is not allowed into the tank[s] you are far less likely to have trouble. Almost all city systems, good as they are, have dirt in them from repairs or other problems.

Keep the junk out of your tanks for fewer problems.
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Old 08-16-2021, 03:46 AM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rwidman View Post
I don't understand the reluctance to drink from a boat's potable water system. This is the very definition of "potable water". Yes, if it's been neglected or filled with bad water, you might have to clean it up a bit. People mentioned Peggie Hall's book and that is a very good resource for how to clean a boat's potable water system and how to keep it clean.

We have been drinking, cooking ,showering and cleaning from our boat's potable water system since we bought it in 2008 with no issues. We make sure we put nothing but good, clean, treated water in and we add an once or two of chlorine bleach to each tank if we are unsure about the water. If a marina's water smells, we won't put it in our tanks, but even this would pass in time.

It's important to use only a "drinking water safe" hose to fill the tanks, to let the water run for a few minutes before beginning to fill the tanks and to never leave the hose out on the dock where a dock neighbor could use it to wash his boat or rinse out his holding tank.

It is expensive, inconvenient and wasteful to buy, transport and drink bottled water and once you have drunk it, you have to responsibly dispose of the plastic waste (empty bottles). Even if you think you are being "green" by putting them in a recycle container, you are contributing to pollution. There are many legitimate uses for plastic, but single use water bottles is not one of them.

Flush out your system, "shock" it with bleach, being sure to get the bleach solution not only in the tank, but in all the water lines, rinse and then fill your tanks with clean treated water and use it like you would use water at your home or business. Have it tested by the county health department if you are still worried about it.

BTW: If I offer you a bottle of water from my boat, it will have been filled from the boat's potable water system. We keep a few water bottles and refill them a few dozen times before discarding them.
What Ron said. Bottled water is a collosal, paranoic waste.
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Old 08-16-2021, 03:52 AM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by H2O_Doc View Post
Can I add some comments, as my company does AWWA (American Water Works Association) sterilization of water lines for schools, hospitals, nursing homes, etc.? Just trying to dispel some misconceptions....

1. The AWWA procedure calls for 100 ppm of chlorine for 3 hours. That equates to about 1 quart of Clorox per 100 gallons of water. Run to all fixtures, let sit 3 hours, then flush. We've done this procedure hundreds of times followed by multiple sampling for E. coli and have never once found a positive E. coli result.

2. I don't like the vinegar idea. Tap water usually contains very little organic material, so it doesn't support the growth of much bacteria. Bacteria need organic material to grow. Vinegar is an organic acid (acetic acid, CH3COOH). Vinegar will not kill bacteria at low doses, but it can add enough carbon to promote bacteria growth over time.

3. The ZeroWater system might remove dissolved solids (TDS) down to zero ppm, but that has nothing to do with bacteria, etc. It does not remove bacteria, just dissolved minerals. I personally think drinking water with zero minerals is not great, but do as you see fit.

4. Filtration (unless rated at less than 0.4 microns) will not remove bacteria. It makes people feel good that they filtered their water, but it doesn't remove heavy metals or bacteria. A 0.4 micron filter will not flow much water, nor will it kill any bacteria downstream. A carbon filter removes taste, but it also removes chlorine from the tap water, so I don't use carbon filters. I'm more concerned about nasty bugs (bacteria) than taste, quite frankly.

5. Chlorine contact with aluminum is potentially corrosive, so make sure not to overdo the 1 quart of chlorine per 100 gallons, and don't chlorinate too often. It's even corrosive to stainless steel, but not significant for short contact times like the 3 hour procedure.

If it were me, for non-drinking water tanks, I'd chlorinate once, then add small amounts of chlorine every few weeks if the water starts smelling a bit.
A carbon filter AFTER the tank removes any residual chlorine whether it be from a municipal water supply or added when filling tanks from well water.
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