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Old 04-24-2017, 09:22 AM   #21
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If wax brings on a good shine, then do not buff. That is abrasive and should only be done if finish is oxidized or chalky. Buff too many times and you will find the thin spots in the paint or gelcoat and then you have bigger problems.

Just had a finish guy on my rig while it was on the hard. Topside had not been buffed in 9yrs and was chalky. Buffing brought it right back to life. Awlcraft paint. Did find some thin spots.

I use the "ten foot rule" regarding finish on my rig. If you see a flaw, back up ten feet. If you can't see it from ten feet, it is NOT THERE.

You have to figure out how many feet apply to your boat. Some are ten, some twenty, some are two feet. Once you settle on your "rule", it makes fussing over finish much simpler.
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Old 04-24-2017, 09:35 AM   #22
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My only comment on this is that it is far, far easier to take care of any finish than it is to re-finish!
If you think getting a boat waxed is expensive, price an Awlgrip job...or better yet, grab the longboards and fair a hull. I've faired one hull in prep for Awlgrip and let me tell you...I wax our boats!
With proper care a well cared for gelcoat can last many, many years. One of the tricks is to clean and wax before any buffing is necessary. Buffing removes gelcoat.
I've seen great looking 30 year old gelcoat and I have seen bad looking 10 year old Awlgrip. As to those who say they like the dull unwaxed look, I am reminded of the fable of the fox with no tail...
The choice is yours.
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Old 04-24-2017, 09:55 AM   #23
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Bruce is right

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bruce B View Post
My only comment on this is that it is far, far easier to take care of any finish than it is to re-finish!
If you think getting a boat waxed is expensive, price an Awlgrip job...or better yet, grab the longboards and fair a hull. I've faired one hull in prep for Awlgrip and let me tell you...I wax our boats!
With proper care a well cared for gelcoat can last many, many years. One of the tricks is to clean and wax before any buffing is necessary. Buffing removes gelcoat.
I've seen great looking 30 year old gelcoat and I have seen bad looking 10 year old Awlgrip. As to those who say they like the dull unwaxed look, I am reminded of the fable of the fox with no tail...
The choice is yours.
Bruce
Almost any thing is better than painting. I have been working with a painter on our OA 456. Every surface to include underside of flybridge hardtop gets painted. We finished priming and sanding on Saturday. We have combined about 450 man-hours into the project thus far. We will tent the boat tomorrow and hope to start awl-gripping (new word) on Wednesday.

The gelcoat was among the poorest quality I have seen. The boat is a 2003, but had thousands upon thousands of cracks. We sanding the entire boat with 80 grit and applied five coats of thinned Interprotect 2000e primer. We then sanded it to a glass smooth finish. Not a single crack is to be seen. I am hoping to have her back in the water in a week. I think we have about 40 man-hours of work remaining.

I am hoping that I have paid forward all the time required to buff. With regular waxing, I should never have to buff the boat. My last boat had Imron paint and after 11 years, looked new, except for a couple of rubs here and there.

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Old 04-24-2017, 10:13 AM   #24
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"I am hoping that I have paid forward all the time required to buff. With regular waxing, I should never have to buff the boat."


Gordon - have had great results with Awlgrip but you never wax Awlgrip surfaces.
maybe every second season you can put a coat of awl[polish on it but its nothing like wax and you want to avoid typical polishing pads and wax.
The surface resists stains, salts and most any degradation with a quick rinse and some soap when necessary - just don't use a brush only a soft pad is required.
We got to 12 seasons on one boat we Awgripped before we sold it with no sign of any problems and it still shined like near new.
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Old 04-24-2017, 11:25 AM   #25
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With regular waxing, I should never have to buff the boat. My last boat had Imron paint and after 11 years, looked new, except for a couple of rubs here and there.

Gordon
A huge NO. Don't wax Awlgrip and if it ever seems to need it, use their polish and their instructions. Do what they say.

The other thing I haven't seen mentioned in this is the importance of regular washing with a mild detergent as recommended, a non abrasive product. If you let dirt and grime accumulate and then have to scrub hard, each time you'll be removing wax and often requiring waxing and buffing. Washing is the first step of the maintenance process.
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Old 04-24-2017, 05:22 PM   #26
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...This year I bought a Shurflow pro buffer and used their pads and compounding paste Buff Magic. Awesome stuff. I then used Starbright polish with a red pad to apply it...
Do you and hotrod mean Shurhold?

Can't find any Shurflow.
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Old 04-24-2017, 05:38 PM   #27
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Opps yes that is what I meant. Fat fingers....
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Old 04-24-2017, 05:39 PM   #28
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Opps yes that is what I meant. Fat fingers....
Thanks!

I've looked at these and the ones vended by Chemical Bros before, but haven't heard any first hand reviews.
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Old 04-24-2017, 05:58 PM   #29
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My boat is Awlgripped and gets waxed at least once a year. It's so much easier to clean with a coat of wax between the dirt and the paint. My charter boat is Awlgripped. The top side paint is 13 years old and still looks good because it's waxed every spring. Just finished having it waxed for the big trip this year. Bill should be around $1,200 (3 to 4 days).

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Old 04-24-2017, 06:04 PM   #30
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Best old Awkgrip finish I've ever seen on a boat is waxed several times a year. The finish is now 15 or 16 years old and it looks like new!
I understand the argument against waxing it but I've never seen such old awlgrip look so good so...
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Old 04-24-2017, 06:07 PM   #31
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Glass. I clean the outside glass with Invisable Glass, then I put a light coat of Meguiar's Cleaner Wax. Really buffs out the glass a seems to remove small scratches. Water beads real nicely.
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Old 04-24-2017, 06:19 PM   #32
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Topcoat Maintenance
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Old 04-24-2017, 07:32 PM   #33
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Wow, what a response! I guess we all have had to get through this job to keep her Bristol. Great ideas. In addition, the PO had the teak decks removed, repaired decks and painted them. I'll have to check with him to see what paint he used before I wax. Thanks guys!
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Old 04-24-2017, 08:00 PM   #34
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I have an Awlgrip painted cap rail. Polish it with a rotary buffer (lambs wool pad and 3M Finesse It) and wax it (Collonite 845 Insulator Wax) and it glistens.

It is a hard surface. The smoother you make it the shinier it will be.
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Old 04-24-2017, 08:00 PM   #35
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Twice per year in Vallejo, California (warmer inland part of San Francisco Bay Area). I'll wax a VW Beetle, not a 42-foot boat!
I can attest to the fact that Ray's boat SHINES! A dark hulled boat nearby has succumbed to the effects of direct sunlight without buff or wax. It shows.

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My boat gets buffed every 5 years whether it needs it or not. I settle for the flat white look.
That's the attitude I've adopted! I keep my boat at the same marina as Giggitoni, but mine is a covered berth across the fairway from USCG Station Vallejo. The covered berth makes a huge difference in the need for buff and wax. In fact, I just got a TF compliment for the hull shine in photos here during a post accident repair 18 months ago. I think Ray used Photoshop to make my boat look better that it really looks up close and personal.

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The process is: floor stripper, 800... 1200... 2000 grit sanding, rubbing compound, polishing compound, colonite wax. It is a huge undertaking, but the results are amazing and, hopefully, I will never have to do it again.

I am watching this thread so I will have an idea on what the follow-up will be. Thanks for asking.
Tom, I have used Buff Magic on the interior hull sides (just the part I can see when aboard!) and followed up with a Colinite Wax in lieu of Poly-whatever Shurflo sells. I was VERY impressed with the dramatic change from the Buff Magic. So was a blowboater friend of mine with a similar aged Tartan SB. He had tried everything with crappy results up to that summer. It might be worth trying it in a small area before committing to the multi-stage approach.

I was less enthused about the longevity of the Colinite, although I understand that they have several different 'recipes' for their various waxes so some may last longer than others.
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Old 04-24-2017, 09:10 PM   #36
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My current boat is gel coat and gets waxed twice a year (if I see it needing it it gets an extra wax). Boat is in south Florida, my guy charges me $1100.00 (43 foot boat).
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Old 04-25-2017, 02:46 AM   #37
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Glass. I clean the outside glass with Invisable Glass, then I put a light coat of Meguiar's Cleaner Wax. Really buffs out the glass a seems to remove small scratches. Water beads real nicely.
GLASS CLEANING
I have found , with hard water spots, that are tough to remove, I use wink, then if still there, buff magic, (pink),. If still there, I put the buffer on the windows, with buff majic.
Also , I have seen here on the forum, people mentioning buffers. I must have buffed , a thousand cars in my life, ( car business), all I found all you need is the cheap buffer, (harbor freight), with trigger controlled speed, on sale 30.00, and a wool pad from them also, (11), it is of upmost IMPORTANCE, that someone show you how to apply the product, and how to work the buffer, and how to clean the pad, ( what to use for spur), and how often to change the pad.Like everything else in this life, something that seems so simple, is not, always the case .Buy at least 6 or 8 pads, when dirty, or shiny with compound, replace.on the buffer. Wash the dirty ones in the washer, but only with COLD, water, let air dry.
Trust me, 3 or 4 hours, you will ready for beer.
I have also found, in the water, not bad on a floater dock, when buffing,.
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Old 04-25-2017, 03:05 AM   #38
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Hotrod, in my first novice buffing attempt, which went quite well, I used foam pads which came in a range of colors indicating the aggression of the pad. I had lambswool ones, but chose foam (except for final polishing off of the final wax),because someone said foam was better, they sure need regular cleaning as you say.
Do you favor foam, or lambswool,or does it vary with the job surface. And, what is "spur"? When you say to use the washer, is that as in washing machine? Forgive the silly questions, I`m new to it, interested to learn.
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Old 04-25-2017, 03:27 AM   #39
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Hotrod, in my first novice buffing attempt, which went quite well, I used foam pads which came in a range of colors indicating the aggression of the pad. I had lambswool ones, but chose foam (except for final polishing off of the final wax),because someone said foam was better, they sure need regular cleaning as you say.
Do you favor foam, or lambswool,or does it vary with the job surface. And, what is "spur"? When you say to use the washer, is that as in washing machine? Forgive the silly questions, I`m new to it, interested to learn.
As long as the boat is gel coat, I would only use wool pads. I personally do not like the foam pads. You are correct, in my opinion, in regard to it varys in regard to surface condition. Like I mentioned earlier, I use the pink buff majic, due to jewelr Rouge, added to the product. The spur, is the tool to clean the pad with. It looks like the spur , from used on horses, but has a handle. You run it against the pad , while spinning the buffer in your hand. It raises the hairs on the wool and takes off excess compound. BUT, you cannot use a metal spur, with pink buff majic, it will make the pad turn black, due to the compound cleaning, and buffing the metal spur.Instead, I take a paint stick, break it in half, and use the coarse side against the pad.Yes, you are correct the washing machine, but make sure you clean the machine after, with another cycle of soap only. I have a separate washing machine in my shop for just rags and pads cleaning.I have been this for a long time, and wished someone had guided me, in my early years, feel free to ask anything, NO questions , are silly, in my opinion
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Old 04-25-2017, 06:22 AM   #40
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I have an Awlgrip painted cap rail. Polish it with a rotary buffer (lambs wool pad and 3M Finesse It) and wax it (Collonite 845 Insulator Wax) and it glistens.

It is a hard surface. The smoother you make it the shinier it will be.
Goes against everything mfg recommends for Awlgrip. If thats what you prefer...have at it but I caution recommending it to others as a good practice.
Awlgrip recommends no machine...no abrasive cleaners. ..no wax
Hand apply their polymer finish and it shines also
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