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Old 12-23-2016, 07:24 PM   #21
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About drilling a metal, younstart small and increase the size of your bit all the way till your desired sized. A good way for drilling metal plates are staged bits don't exactly know the name in English but these are conical bits that increase hole diameter with depth.
Fot extracting a stuck or broken bolt, you first drill a hole in your bolt that you stuck your LH bits in it with one or two hammer stoke then use ur drill.
I never ckecked for any documentation about it just learned that from elders that knew what they were doing. As an example when my father was at school, at that time they were learning things ranging from electricity to forging and working with metals. This was a time when working experience was more valuable than reading books.
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Old 12-23-2016, 07:27 PM   #22
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Titanium nitride coated drills work well, even the cheap ones from Harbor Freight.
Start small.
Stainless needs lubrication, they make lubes specifically for stainless.
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Old 12-23-2016, 07:58 PM   #23
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Saw an interesting post...guy used a tiny diamond tipped hole saw.....

May have to see just how small they come....can't imagine they come small enough for most jobs...but on big bolts, I wonder how much faster or precise they might be.

Well so far...I have heard that sharp bits are the ticket, which means lots of them and because inexpensive ones might work just as well, especially sharp ones, may just buy a drawer full of reasonably priced ones.

Some of the larger highly recommended ones were $200 to $700 a bit...that IS out of my range.
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Old 12-23-2016, 08:17 PM   #24
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Question, as my English is far from perfect, when you talk about LH bits is it this kind of things:

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Old 12-23-2016, 08:26 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
Is carbide harder than colbalt?

Is there a good sharpener that will do different cutting angles and all metal bits?
I think carbide is harder but so hard that it's brittle .If carbide gets in a bind it will snap . I ran a drill press for a few years and then advanced to a machinist for about 20 years . I had to learn how to sharpen my own bits by hand . You can do it with a little practice . The way I learned was a kept a new drill bit in my box and looked at it while grinding the dull one . Now I can take a bit that's been busted in half and put new grind in just a few minutes .It just takes some trial and error.
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Old 12-23-2016, 08:35 PM   #26
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Greetings,
Mr. L_t. Post#24. No. They are known as Easy-Outs or screw extractors. A LH drill bit looks exactly like a regular HSS drill bit but the flutes spiral in the opposite direction. Meaning you have to run your drill in reverse to use them. The advantage is that while drilling, you are, in theory, unscrewing your broken stud. Sometimes just the reverse drilling is enough "grab" to actually remove the stud.

The Easy-Outs are used in a hole you have already drilled and turned to the left, hopefully grabbing the broken stud/bolt and unscrewing it.

Mr. ps. Diamond is a very different animal again. The bit MUST be kept as cool as possible which usually means copious amounts or water or coolant. If the bit heats up at all you run the risk of burning the diamonds which are only carbon, after all. Diamond is best on hard materials like glass or ceramic. Even hardened steel may be too soft for diamond and the diamond may clog up too readily.
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Old 12-23-2016, 08:51 PM   #27
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Good you tube.... http://r.search.yahoo.com/_ylt=A2KLq...QRQcRJMMsaUZQ-

Looks like all carbide bits win for ultimate hardness, along with locksmith bits....

But if just drilling out even grade 8 bolts, plain old Dewalt colbalt drills should do the trick along with any other colbalt brethern.

Once you break an easy out or drill bit in a hole...looks like a solid carbide might be your only chance of drilling in cleanly.
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Old 12-23-2016, 08:54 PM   #28
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Mr RTF thank you very much for the clarification!
So what I was saying in my previous post is related to these easy-out, that is why I was saying that it is going in a predrilled hole Sorry for the confusion.
But about ur LH bits, how can it remove a broken bolt if drilling through? is it also conical so it will stuck at a point? If not it will just drill through no?
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Old 12-23-2016, 09:00 PM   #29
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Sheer torque reversing the bolt...

Many posts from machinists are not favorable to easy outs....they are saying if a left handed drill doesn't do it, chances are it's not coming out with an easy out either.
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Old 12-23-2016, 09:11 PM   #30
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Home Despot, or anybody's cobalt bits are pretty good. LH twist is dandy for backing screws. You can ruin any bit with too much force, dull, lack of lubrication - anything is far better than nothing, stainless steel is noted for 'work hardening' - that is too slow or too fast cutting makes the metal harder. Consumer grade carbide is usually not sharp since they're sold for masonry or concrete.
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Old 12-23-2016, 10:02 PM   #31
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Greetings,
Mr. ps. I tend to agree with the view of the "machinists" as I've never had much, if any success with Easy-Outs. Haven't used them that much so I guess that's why I can't recall ever breaking one. Just the fear of such a breakage keeps me shy of them.

There are a bunch of different techniques to remove a broken stud/bolt but the usual awkward location in an ER usually limits what one is able to employ. Given the sometimes limited space to swing a hammer to center punch, limited visibility (NOT helped at all by failing eyesight) and small selection of the "best" tools makes a simple repair turn into an OMG! crapshoot. BIG difference between working on a well lit bench and hanging upside down while trying to prevent oneself from falling into the bilge while wielding a hammer/punch/drill AND holding a light in your teeth.

The BEST, by far, technique for extraction of broken/seized bits is heat via a torch but again, if you're working with a casting (block/pump housing) you are limited by the damage that excessive heat can do to above mentioned block/pump housing etc.

I feel for ya brother...

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Old 12-23-2016, 10:40 PM   #32
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Sheer torque reversing the bolt...

Many posts from machinists are not favorable to easy outs....they are saying if a left handed drill doesn't do it, chances are it's not coming out with an easy out either.


They are correct. Have never used an easy out for your application. Drill 50% of the center out and then switch to a left hand twist at 75% size. If that don't do it either retap or helicoil as needed. Each job is a bit different.
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Old 12-23-2016, 10:42 PM   #33
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I mostly use "triumph" brand HSS drill bits, even on Stainless. If I have to drill something that I know has been hardened, I will use a solid carbide drill bit. When drilling Stainless Steel it is most important to use lower speed and HIGH pressure as high speed will work harden the Stainless. Another option to a broken bolt that is proud or flush, is to plug weld a nut onto the broken bolt, let cool and back out with a wrench.
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Old 12-23-2016, 10:52 PM   #34
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Greetings,
Mr. ps. I tend to agree with the view of the "machinists" as I've never had much, if any success with Easy-Outs. Haven't used them that much so I guess that's why I can't recall ever breaking one. Just the fear of such a breakage keeps me shy of them.

There are a bunch of different techniques to remove a broken stud/bolt but the usual awkward location in an ER usually limits what one is able to employ. Given the sometimes limited space to swing a hammer to center punch, limited visibility (NOT helped at all by failing eyesight) and small selection of the "best" tools makes a simple repair turn into an OMG! crapshoot. BIG difference between working on a well lit bench and hanging upside down while trying to prevent oneself from falling into the bilge while wielding a hammer/punch/drill AND holding a light in your teeth.

The BEST, by far, technique for extraction of broken/seized bits is heat via a torch but again, if you're working with a casting (block/pump housing) you are limited by the damage that excessive heat can do to above mentioned block/pump housing etc.

I feel for ya brother...

Mr RTF one day I knew a women who... No ok just forget about that this is not the right place
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Old 12-23-2016, 11:11 PM   #35
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Parks...got any left handed sets too?

Maybe when I stop long enough say at Ft Pierce I may be interested.....or when passing through your area in early march.
They make left hand bits but I don't stock them. Maybe I should. They also make an interesting screw extractor that I recently put in stock but haven't tried yet.
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Old 12-23-2016, 11:14 PM   #36
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Rufus T, I like that one.
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Old 12-23-2016, 11:23 PM   #37
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Greetings,
Mr. ps. I tend to agree with the view of the "machinists" as I've never had much, if any success with Easy-Outs. Haven't used them that much so I guess that's why I can't recall ever breaking one. Just the fear of such a breakage keeps me shy of them.

There are a bunch of different techniques to remove a broken stud/bolt but the usual awkward location in an ER usually limits what one is able to employ. Given the sometimes limited space to swing a hammer to center punch, limited visibility (NOT helped at all by failing eyesight) and small selection of the "best" tools makes a simple repair turn into an OMG! crapshoot. BIG difference between working on a well lit bench and hanging upside down while trying to prevent oneself from falling into the bilge while wielding a hammer/punch/drill AND holding a light in your teeth.

The BEST, by far, technique for extraction of broken/seized bits is heat via a torch but again, if you're working with a casting (block/pump housing) you are limited by the damage that excessive heat can do to above mentioned block/pump housing etc.

I feel for ya brother...



https://m.lowes.com/pd/BernzOmatic-T...6-25b4351585dc

A friend of mine has had good luck with this torch at under $30
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Old 12-23-2016, 11:46 PM   #38
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Part of the good advice in the thread has been to keep your bits sharp. A few years ago I bought a Drill Doctor. They are really good, and use a diamond abrasive wheel so it will sharpen any type of bit.
https://www.drilldoctor.com/compare-...bit-sharpeners
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Old 12-24-2016, 03:35 AM   #39
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Lubrication Lubrication Lubrication Lubrication

The right Lubrication when drilling SS or any other metal is critical for both cooling and friction reduction. Dont just use any oil sitting around the workshop and expect it to cool and Lubricate the drill bit .
As RT would say the correct Lubrication is good for both man and machine

I added a stiffening base to my davits. I tried all different bits, but when I added a good quality lube, the hardness of the bit no longer made a lot of difference. With proper lube, the task went from impossible to cutting like through butter. This was through 1/4" SS plate.
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Old 12-24-2016, 04:43 AM   #40
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Funny timing on this thread, having just broken off a 5/16" tap on a piece of 1/2" 316 stainless plate I was tapping for my down riggers. The u-tube videos I could find recommended tungsten bits, I tried cobalt and it wouldn't touch the core of the tap. The video had a guy drilling holes right through a HSS hardened drill bit all up and down the bit length.

I got mine out by having a welder TIG a stud onto the broken tap and then rocked it out with a pair of needle nosed vise grips. The welder cost me $20, a tungsten bit was estimated at $30 and not available locally. My other option was to punch it out and help coil it back down to 5/16" after re-tapping, not my first choice.

I lubed with LPS Tricut, which was recommended by my fabricator, neither HSS or cobalt moved any metal on the tap.
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