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Old 11-15-2016, 10:09 PM   #201
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GO FOR IT! I have lost track of my projects especially those for Wifey.
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Old 11-18-2016, 12:49 PM   #202
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Foggy
Just got back to my laptop and could get a good look at your pictures.
Your panels indeed look nice and I appreciate your comments re: hemming vs binding.
You are lucky as all of your panels are straight edges - many folks have to contend w/ curves which make that approach tough.
I will try to keep your suggestion of close stitching the bottom of vinyl windows in mind the next time - great tip!

Kevin
If you find a table you can dedicate to the machine - a cut-out w/ a lowered section to place the portable machine on make make things a little easier...it doesn't have to be exact fit like the Sailrite tables - even a slightly larger hole w/ a lowered section w/ correct thickness spacers will be a big improvement. and if you make a "plug" to fill the hole when not sewing it becomes a useful craft / work table for many other uses.

Having a panel lie flat from infeed thru stitch & outfeed helps w/ alignment & neat stitching.
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Old 11-18-2016, 01:13 PM   #203
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Sewing replacement vinyl into existing window panels

One other tip I've been meaning to post is regarding replacing old worn / discolored vinyl windows in an existing canvas panel that is otherwise still usable.

Most commercial shops will only sew new vinyl inside the old and cut out the old leaving a rough edge on the old at the vinyl / canvas interface - not very attractive.

If you are doing these yourself and don't mind taking some extra time it is possible to eliminate the old completely and install new...if done correctly!

DO NOT CUT OUT THE OLD VINYL FROM A CANVAS PANEL - you will lose the shape and the panel will likely never fit properly again.

Vinyl windows are almost always sewn in w/ 2 rows of stitching - an inside (next to the folded canvas edge) and an outside (usually about 1/2" outboard from the first stitch.
  1. use the existing vinyl as a template to cut a new piece of vinyl the same size / shape as the existing (I usually cut mine slightly larger by maybe a 1/4" all around unless it will interfere w/ zippers, etc)
  2. using a seam ripper - remove only the outer stitching of the vinyl
  3. cut the vinyl as close as possible to the remaining inner stitch line - this retains the shape of the window / panel but allows stitching the new panel in place
  4. using seam tape (double sided tape) position the new vinyl over (inside) the existing window
  5. stitch the new vinyl window in approx where the outer stitch line was prior
  6. flip the panel over and work from the outside to remove the inner stitch line of the old window and remove the old window and the seam tape
  7. now sticth the inner stitch line through the new vinyl & canvas adjacent to the turned edge of the canvas (just outside the visible window area)
    I like Foggy's suggestion to use s closer stitch on the bottoms of windows to help prevent water intrusion!
  8. your old panel w/ new vinyl is done and should fit as well as the original or one w/ new vinyl sewn over the old and old cut out - and it will look a whole lot more professional.

I don't know of a pro shop that will take the time to do replacements this way but especially if your are DIY give this a try
I realize pics would help but I have none to do in the near future and figured winter may be the time for some to do this kind of repair / upgrade - I will try to remember next time I have one to replace to take & post some pics
Attached Files
File Type: pdf Vinyl Window Replacement Process.pdf (51.6 KB, 3 views)
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Old 11-18-2016, 01:23 PM   #204
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Alright. You guys are killing me. I have wanted to learn to sew. A little anyway. The Admiral and I have discussed several times the need to re-sew or replace the canvas on the Sea Note. She doesn't want me to stay tied up WORKING on the boat all the time. I do feel some sick requirement to do something most of the time. I am watching this with growing interest. NEW canvas all about sounds delicious. I am scared.
You'all please continue the enticement exercise!
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Old 11-18-2016, 04:13 PM   #205
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Tool...

Don't be intimidated - if you do most any DIT work you can learn to do canvas work...it is not rocket science.
Have you looked at the companion post DIY Canvas - Show Off Your Projects?

All of these are examples of projects completed by amateurs - I've sewed some stuff for others to earn a few$ that basically paid for my machine / accessories but I learned by looking at others work and duplicating it - I did pick up a couple of books and have viewed many of the Sailrite videos...the key as others have stated - start small to learn & practice and work up to larger / more difficult projects.
Learn how to pattern stuff it helps a lot - saves wasted material, & avoids unnecessary frustrations, etc
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Old 11-18-2016, 10:47 PM   #206
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Thanks Bacchus, yeah I know I can. Also looks like a useful hobby. Yes I have read quite a few of the projects posted. Thanks for the encouragement.
Dave
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Old 11-19-2016, 09:41 AM   #207
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Don--

Most of my panels covering the rear deck area are for the most part rectangular. But not over the helm. Notice the top and bottoms of the panel in one of my pictures, they each have curvature that requires two pieces of fabric which are cut to the pattern. Each of those two pieces are first sewn inside out at the outer edge. The other two edges were then folded 1/2" with seamstick. This assembly now resembles a U. That U sandwiches over the raw edge of teh larger part of that panel's section and sewn.

Also the header that fits into an awning track is made from the pattern. I laid out three panel patterns and used the top of matched three to make the outline for the header. The width of the header is then subtracted from each of the three panel's length.

There is enough curvature where I could not get by with straight cuts except for the edges where the panels zip together.

Vinyl replacement! Yes, that is the way I do mine also. But I make it easier for myself and grossly over cut the vinyl's size. After the final sewing, just use your shears to trim the edges, makes it a little easier to do.

GEES---- IT IS GOOD TO SEE OTHERS GETTING INTO MAKING THEIR OWN CANVAS. KEEP IT UP GUYS, don't let sewing intimidate you!!
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Old 11-19-2016, 11:27 AM   #208
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Foggy...
Got it...interesting approach to curves... hadn't considered doing it that way but will keep it in mind.
Agree...glad to see the interest and appreciate all the contributions.
Maybe one of these days this will become a sticky!?
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Old 11-20-2016, 08:53 PM   #209
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A transient sailor was in the slip next to me last week and we shared with him our Rum one evening. The next day he wanted to return the favor but had no Rum. He said he had a sewing machine on board and did we need anything sewn. Well Heck yes. Our dinghy cover always came off due to lack of enough strapping locations. He marked the required areas and took our cover. 20 minutes later he's back with eyelets fimly attached and even brought us a couple ratched straps to tie down with. The dinghy cover has not moved since but the sailor has moved on. Moral of the story is the power of Rum and being a good neighbor and the value of a sewing machine.
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Old 11-21-2016, 07:02 AM   #210
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Deano...
Absolutely correct - I've done many sewing jobs for beer or bourbon
I much prefer to barter...especially with my local diesel & hydraulic mechanics
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Old 01-22-2017, 10:15 PM   #211
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WE did the jump and bought a Sailrite last month, we did all ready some project, but today was funny my wife finished on project cover for your sofa but at sea during navigation

Happy solid machine simple and strong but heavy ...

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Old 01-22-2017, 10:44 PM   #212
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It's an awesome little machine. Carry it anywhere. So far I have paid for the cost of the machine with the projects I've done. New flybridge cushions, cockpit bolsters, and a Phifertex front windshield cover. Starting on new sundeck encloser in a few weeks. Then the flybridge after that.
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Old 01-23-2017, 09:55 AM   #213
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Encouraging to see others venturing into fabricating their canvas! And practice does result in better outcomes. I suggest watching some Sailrite videos on pattern making!
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Old 01-24-2017, 10:29 AM   #214
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I got into canvas knowing nothing a few years ago. I have the Sailrite LSZ with all the goodies. Major projects so far have been two bimini tops and a winter cover for our previous 37 foot sailboat. Oh, and a sun top for a dune buggy.

If I were to buy another machine knowing what I do now, I would go online to ebay and pick up a walking foot Chinese machine. These machines are the same ones sold by Sailrite for a fraction of the cost. The difference is more attention is paid to the quality of the Sailrite machines and they are gone thru and checked out by Sailrite before you get them. Some of the Chinese parts are a little under par on quality and are replaced before you get them by Sailrite. Sailrite sells all the parts needed for these Chinese machines at their site as they are the same machines.

If you use your LS or LSZ machine long enough you'll sooner or later crash it but good. (they're very powerful and you won't stall them) So you'll be buying new parts. Fortunately the parts are reasonable at Sailrite. Their manuals on the machines are pretty much essential and available. They go to great lengths to show you how to repair your machine if it messes up or you crash it. (and you will)...

Its pretty amazing what you can do with these machines including huge projects like a winter cover. You have to be a bit patient and think things thru beforehand as it gets pretty tough to pass ten feet of canvas under the arm. You can do it though.

As stated by previous posters, if you are not going to sew sails, you really don't need a zig zag stitch so the LS machine would be cheaper, considerably simpler and easier to repair and maintain.

I buy most of my supplies from Sailrite as they are such a good company to do business with. Their videos and live support by knowledgeable people is well worth the minor extra cost. They have some good books that are essential reading if you are a do it yourselfer. If you call them they'll tell you what are their best books.

One last thing. Go slow and be patient. Sewing takes practice. All my projects have turned out decent, but practice is needed to turn out professional results on bigger jobs. Start with some simple small items to get a feel for sewing. Port covers and ditty bags are great projects to get started. A decent sewing machine is one of the few things in boating that will pay for itself if you use it. You'll make a lot of friends at the dock with it too...lol...
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Old 01-24-2017, 02:24 PM   #215
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tedted View Post



I buy most of my supplies from Sailrite as they are such a good company to do business with. Their videos and live support by knowledgeable people is well worth the minor extra cost. They have some good books that are essential reading if you are a do it yourselfer. If you call them they'll tell you what are their best books.

One last thing. Go slow and be patient. Sewing takes practice. All my projects have turned out decent, but practice is needed to turn out professional results on bigger jobs. Start with some simple small items to get a feel for sewing. Port covers and ditty bags are great projects to get started. A decent sewing machine is one of the few things in boating that will pay for itself if you use it. You'll make a lot of friends at the dock with it too...lol...
Yeah, I sometimes purchase from Sailrite

Recently I purchased 5 yards of a material and 40 yards of another material. The clowns wrapped the 40 yards on top of the the 5 yards. So to get at the 5 yards I had to unroll 40 yards--- 120 feet! I bitched, demanded to speak to a manager......told I was speaking to the manager. They did offer to accept a return...I pay for it. Because I needed the material then, not later I unrolled and re-rolled the stuff. SOMETIMES THEY ARE NOT VERY PROFESSIONAL!

YKK zippers! Try Rochfords, at least the give a good discount when purchasing larger quantities. So yes, Sailrite is the place to shop....sometimes! My suggestion is to shop around.

Sewing machines... I purchased a Juki 1541S new on Ebay later a servo motor. The junk servo motor went west after about a year. I use the clutch motor that came with the machine. Trully exciting to go from 0 to FULL SPEED AHEAD, DAMN THE STICHES .

I did find though that connecting the motor wiring for 220vac and running it on 120vac plus changing the motor pulley to the smallest size possible that I can now get by with a clutch motor.

And expensive Juki's have their issues also. I have gotten to be an expert timing that %^&*$. If I were to purchase another machine.....maybe Juki, maybe not.... I would search out something with a 17" minimum throat. In any case, I do agree with TEDTED to look elsewhere besides Sailrite for a machine. And Ebay is not the only "other" place to look. Consider Google. There are thousands of great deals out there for used machines.

Sooooo......happy sewing
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Old 01-25-2017, 06:50 PM   #216
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yeah, everyone that's sewn bigger items dreams of a machine with a deep throat. All you need to do is get off a couple grand or so because the people with those machines ain't letting them go...
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Old 01-25-2017, 10:35 PM   #217
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yeah, everyone that's sewn bigger items dreams of a machine with a deep throat. All you need to do is get off a couple grand or so because the people with those machines ain't letting them go...

Right on. That is why I have an old boat and an old car but a new sewing machine
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Old 01-25-2017, 11:46 PM   #218
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Step up from LSZ

I made a step up from the Sailrite LSZ that I had and sold. I made up what I call a luggable. It consists of a true industrial Juki LU562 compound feed that has a DC motor attached directly to the machine head. Like many people, I donít have room for a permanent sewing table. The sewing head has an oversized flywheel and a 5:1 cog belt reduction. Motor drive is variable speed foot control, make a single stitch through anything I have sewn or zip along at 15 feet per minute. I have since made a fitted sewing board to go around the machine head to support material. See photos.

Sewing is not my profession, but I included 2 photos of my projects completed with the luggable. 1) fitted helm cover 2) chair covers, rear drop curtain, aft deck sun shade Sailrite supplied the materials (on sale) Ė vinyl coated Sunbrella Plus sewn with PTFE thread (I watched Sailrite video on patterning many times!!
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DSCN0156.jpg   DSCN0157.jpg   DSCN0158.jpg   DSCN0394.jpg   DSCN0396.jpg  

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Old 01-26-2017, 09:27 AM   #219
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Alabama--- GOOD FOR YOU! I believe your boat could even look nicer with new curtains around your rear deck's hardtop.....of course only if summers are not too hot where you are.
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Old 01-26-2017, 09:40 AM   #220
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Greetings,
Mr. SB. You're the kinda guy I'd want as my dock neighbor. Nice job.
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