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Old 09-10-2016, 08:10 AM   #61
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You can leave the teak natural and years later decide to do something different.

If you varnish you are sentencing yourself to a life of varnish maintenance. Other coatings require maintenance too. Yes all those coatings can be removed to go back to natural but what a job!

My suggestion is leave the teak alone while you enjoy the boat and fix everything else. If it finally makes it to the top of your list to make it look yachty then go for it.
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Old 09-10-2016, 09:33 AM   #62
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For sure on the top of my list since I like pretty things! LOL!
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Old 09-10-2016, 09:39 AM   #63
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Originally Posted by yachtbrokerguy View Post
Often times in the subtropical sun of Florida, the oil on teak will oxidize below the surface leaving black spots. It looks great for a few months but then starts to blacken.
What he said. ^
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Old 09-10-2016, 09:55 AM   #64
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The birth of another varnish slave. []
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Old 09-10-2016, 10:01 AM   #65
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My suggestion is leave the teak alone while you enjoy the boat and fix everything else. If it finally makes it to the top of your list to make it look yachty then go for it.
That's what we did...four years later and I'm finally getting to it.
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Old 09-10-2016, 10:54 AM   #66
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We bought an Albin early this year that had not had bright work maintained for some time. Additionally a PO put several coats of paint and a coat of non-skid sandy stuff on the teak decks. We originally thought about tearing the teak off and glassing the deck, but on further inspection, the deck looked pretty good.

After sanding all of the decks down to teak (since I still have a day job, the invaluable Admiral was the one sanding), we're in the process of cleaning, sealing, and repairing, with an eye toward getting through this year and recaulking everything in spring. We must be a couple of those sick puppies that don't mind the work, and the finished product is worth the effort. Teak is easier on bare feet too.

To each their own. I understand the advantages of no teak too. One of the folks at our marina asked us when we were going to enjoy our boat (we do take it out often - maybe more than most at the marina), and our reply was that we are enjoying the boat now. The reason for buying a trawler in the first place is to enjoy the journey - even if some of the journey involves sanding and Cetol.
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Old 09-10-2016, 04:09 PM   #67
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Then there's hemp oil;

Hemp Shield - Best Wood Finish and Deck Stain Sealer Provider

Badger's Blog: Badger Wood Oil - Why Hemp?
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Old 09-10-2016, 05:28 PM   #68
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Well, well, well, look what I found under the Pilot House seat when I was having a clear-out today!
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Old 09-10-2016, 06:56 PM   #69
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Yes, the Cetol Marine Clear (or teak tinted) are both satin finish, Bruce, and fine for the duckboard/swim-step/boarding platform - whatever you want to call it. It appears each country seems to have its own name for it.
I`ve taken the line of least resistance and used the American term as the preponderance of readers are. Yes, it`s a duck board too,as the "evidence of duck visits" sometimes indicates.
If the Deks Olje #1 doesn`t work out, I`m tempted to use a "fence stain" finish I once used at home. The last bit of the application involves lying prone on the dock and stretching over the water to reach the (to be generic) "work surface" with the brush.
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Old 09-10-2016, 07:54 PM   #70
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Well, well, well, look what I found under the Pilot House seat when I was having a clear-out today!
That's it .... What many consider the bible of varnishing ect.
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Old 09-10-2016, 08:14 PM   #71
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Greetings,
Mr. PB. Granted, Cetol does make a satin finish product BUT I think it would still be too slippery for a swim step. Mr. BK has the correct idea IMO-leave it natural which, is the best non skid surface.
You might think so RTF but it's not too slippery. We use it all the time. I re-coat about every 3 years. The benefit being no need to sand, other than a light sand on the rails, then just a wipe down with a turps rag, and slap it on - the Cetol, that is...
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Old 09-10-2016, 11:26 PM   #72
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Yes, the Cetol Marine Clear (or teak tinted) are both satin finish, Bruce, and fine for the duckboard/swim-step/boarding platform - whatever you want to call it. It appears each country seems to have its own name for it.
I've adopted "duckboard", thanks to my brothers and sisters in Australia. Sounds very descriptive! Thank you.
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Old 09-11-2016, 12:40 AM   #73
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Hemp Shield is now off the list because they say about their product,
Quote:
"The reason we do not recommend a second coat of Hemp Shield for exterior is two-fold:

1) The formula for Hemp Shield contains some wax emulsions. While it is re-coatable when exposed to severe weather there may be a separation between coats.

2) The solids in a single coat are more than sufficient to protect the wood long term. A second coat is usually a waste of money."
Still looking at hemp though, as it's new to me...(see signature below)
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Old 09-11-2016, 08:04 AM   #74
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Just saw the same year boat as mine with all the brightwork painted. What an update and it looks beautiful. Something to think about in the future.
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Old 09-11-2016, 08:18 AM   #75
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Just saw the same year boat as mine with all the brightwork painted. What an update and it looks beautiful. Something to think about in the future.
Ms. D - Since teak is has natural oils in it, the maintenance will be no less than other finishes.
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Old 09-11-2016, 09:29 AM   #76
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Ms. D - Since teak is has natural oils in it, the maintenance will be no less than other finishes.
Incorrect, properly painted teak is far less maintenance than varnished or oiled teak.
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Old 09-11-2016, 09:42 AM   #77
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dreamer,
That's what makes teak so difficult .. and different ..oil.
That oil causes big problems with adhesion. Where teak was traditionally used in the east Pacific they didn't attempt to paint it. They used oil and oil being the nature of teak worked well.

So getting rid of the oil takes away the very nature of teak and what makes it wonderful. But w the oil adhesion is a problem. I wonder what the situation on our boats would be if they had used White Oak instead of teak. How close to White Oak is teak w the oil removed? However the chemicals that are said to remove the oil probably only removes the oil right on the surface and soon (since 99% of the oil may be still there) the remaining oil may migrate to the surface and cause the usual adhesion problems. I think one should dance w teak and not fight it. If you bleach the oils off teak you may be better off just replacing it w Fir or Oak.

But re finnishing Teak probably the best way is to use oil. But who wants an oily sticky boat? Or some other finish that lets the wood breath. Sealing it up may be good but not ideal and on a boat water is everywhere and gets everywhere ... eventially.
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Old 09-11-2016, 09:52 AM   #78
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Help me on the paint and teak. I've been looking at the possibility of painting my window frames for appearance sake on my Albin. Saw a few that were painted, and it updates the boat a little appearance-wise. Also read here on TF that you should never paint teak because of the inherent oil in the wood, so Capt. Bill - you bring an interesting question to me when you say "properly painted teak".

If there is a way to do this maximizing adhesion of paint that doesn't require stripping, Cetol, then paint over Cetol, help me out here. The Admiral is interested in white window frames. Paint type? Manufacturer? Process of doing this without having the paint flake or peel? Anyone with pictures that did this?
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Old 09-11-2016, 10:00 AM   #79
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dreamer,
That's what makes teak so difficult .. and different ..oil.
That oil causes big problems with adhesion. Where teak was traditionally used in the east Pacific they didn't attempt to paint it. They used oil and oil being the nature of teak worked well.

So getting rid of the oil takes away the very nature of teak and what makes it wonderful. But w the oil adhesion is a problem. I wonder what the situation on our boats would be if they had used White Oak instead of teak. How close to White Oak is teak w the oil removed? However the chemicals that are said to remove the oil probably only removes the oil right on the surface and soon (since 99% of the oil may be still there) the remaining oil may migrate to the surface and cause the usual adhesion problems. I think one should dance w teak and not fight it. If you bleach the oils off teak you may be better off just replacing it w Fir or Oak.

But re finnishing Teak probably the best way is to use oil. But who wants an oily sticky boat? Or some other finish that lets the wood breath. Sealing it up may be good but not ideal and on a boat water is everywhere and gets everywhere ... eventially.
Never bought teak oil, do it really get sticky?
I have used plain old Minwax oil based stains on teak,
Seems to last as long as other people's use of teak oil
I never seen Minwax get sticky.

Something I have been using is ZEP high traffic floor polish.
ZEP 128 oz. High-Traffic Floor Polish-ZUHTFF128 - The Home Depot
This puts a nice gloss shine on interior wood on top of wood stains. Takes a lot of coats to build layers like a varnish. Typically 4 coats will give a nice shine.

I had read about this on RV forums.

And I bought some Aerospace 303 UV protectant spray 32 oz off Amazon.
https://www.amazon.com/303-30313-CSR...pace+303&psc=1

I plan to put that on top of the Acrylic floor polish, doing a test on using the ZEP outside on teak and mahogany wood.
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Old 09-11-2016, 10:08 AM   #80
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Help me on the paint and teak. I've been looking at the possibility of painting my window frames for appearance sake on my Albin. Saw a few that were painted, and it updates the boat a little appearance-wise. Also read here on TF that you should never paint teak because of the inherent oil in the wood, so Capt. Bill - you bring an interesting question to me when you say "properly painted teak".

If there is a way to do this maximizing adhesion of paint that doesn't require stripping, Cetol, then paint over Cetol, help me out here. The Admiral is interested in white window frames. Paint type? Manufacturer? Process of doing this without having the paint flake or peel? Anyone with pictures that did this?
Grand Banks boats (at least mine now and 3 my previous ones) have teak window frames, white painted.
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