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Old 08-21-2017, 09:27 AM   #81
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Personally, I wish that on board waste processing systems were accepted by environmentalists instead of their taking radical positions. If such systems were approved I would install one but not until such treated waste can be legally discharged.

I agree with you. Unfortunately, Puget Sound was recently made a no discharge area. It that had not occurred, I would have seriously considered installing a treatment system. It would have been very convenient and likely more environmentally friendly than having my waste tank pumped into a muni sewage system that may, or may not, treat the waste equally well.
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Old 08-21-2017, 10:02 AM   #82
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Now back to septic holding tanks. They contain septic effluent, not anti-septic matter that here in the States eventually finds its way back to a municipal sewage system.

You're starting from from two false premises: 1. That holding tanks are necessarily septic tanks...and 2. that the waste on land that finds its way into municipal sewage treatment systems is anti-septic. Neither is true.

But...it's your boat. If you'd rather treat the symptoms instead of preventing the disease, it's fine with me.

I wish that on board waste processing systems were accepted by environmentalists instead of their taking radical positions.

I agree with you on that 100%.

If such systems were approved I would install one but not until such treated waste can be legally discharged.


There are actually more coastal waters where the discharge of treated waste from a USCG certified Type I or II is legal than there are where it's not. Your New England waters happen to be one of the "hotbeds" of NDZ zealotry. If you check the EPA list of NDZs by state EPA NDZ list you'll see that except for some small enclosed harbors and a few well-meaning but misguided marinas, North Carolina and a small area in VA a the mouth of the Chesapeake are the only ones on the East coast between RI and the FL Keys....the Keys and Desting Harbor are the only two on the whole Gulf of Mexico. SoCal is also an NDZ "hotbed," but until the WA states zealots finally succeeded in making Puget Sound an NDZ, Huntington Harbor (a small enclosed harbor off SF Bay in Sausalito) was the only one on the whole West coast north of Santa Barbara.
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Old 08-21-2017, 12:09 PM   #83
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Now back to septic holding tanks. They contain septic effluent, not anti-septic matter that here in the States eventually finds its way back to a municipal sewage system.

You're starting from from two false premises: 1. That holding tanks are necessarily septic tanks...and 2. that the waste on land that finds its way into municipal sewage treatment systems is anti-septic. Neither is true.

But...it's your boat. If you'd rather treat the symptoms instead of preventing the disease, it's fine with me.

I wish that on board waste processing systems were accepted by environmentalists instead of their taking radical positions.

I agree with you on that 100%.

If such systems were approved I would install one but not until such treated waste can be legally discharged.


There are actually more coastal waters where the discharge of treated waste from a USCG certified Type I or II is legal than there are where it's not. Your New England waters happen to be one of the "hotbeds" of NDZ zealotry. If you check the EPA list of NDZs by state EPA NDZ list you'll see that except for some small enclosed harbors and a few well-meaning but misguided marinas, North Carolina and a small area in VA a the mouth of the Chesapeake are the only ones on the East coast between RI and the FL Keys....the Keys and Desting Harbor are the only two on the whole Gulf of Mexico. SoCal is also an NDZ "hotbed," but until the WA states zealots finally succeeded in making Puget Sound an NDZ, Huntington Harbor (a small enclosed harbor off SF Bay in Sausalito) was the only one on the whole West coast north of Santa Barbara.


I just want to focus on the first part of your reply. I am using my IPad and still in the learning stage on how to cut and paste.

As to the similarity to holding tanks and a ceptic tank, they both hold toilet waste. Yes, there is some processing in a home's ceptic tank which eventually gets pumped out. Gees, that is exactly what goes on in my boat's holding tank including use of fresh water.

Next the same zealots who insist on pump outs have yet to complain about where the treasured pumped effluent ultimately ends up. I am sure where a lot of it ends up especially after a heavy rain.

I do believe that most everybody who participates in the numerous boating forums try to do the right things pertaining to the environment. With that stated, I am lost to see how my anti stink air filter stuck into my tanks vent does any harm to anything but does a lot of good by preventing stink.
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Old 08-21-2017, 12:50 PM   #84
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I just want to focus on the first part of your reply. I am using my IPad and still in the learning stage on how to cut and paste.

As to the similarity to holding tanks and a ceptic tank, they both hold toilet waste. Yes, there is some processing in a home's ceptic tank which eventually gets pumped out. Gees, that is exactly what goes on in my boat's holding tank including use of fresh water.

Next the same zealots who insist on pump outs have yet to complain about where the treasured pumped effluent ultimately ends up. I am sure where a lot of it ends up especially after a heavy rain.

I do believe that most everybody who participates in the numerous boating forums try to do the right things pertaining to the environment. With that stated, I am lost to see how my anti stink air filter stuck into my tanks vent does any harm to anything but does a lot of good by preventing stink.
You are misinterpreting (accidentally or on purpose) other people's posts. Nobody said or implied that by using a vent filter you are harming anyone or anything.

What several people did say is that you are inhibiting the flow of oxygen to your holding tank and by doing that, you are keeping bacteria from decomposing the sewage. You are treating the symptom, not the cause.

Get rid of the filter, use the proper treatment in your holding tank and you will have little or no odor.

Or, have a stinky tank and try to cover it up with a filter.

Your choice.
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Old 08-21-2017, 12:56 PM   #85
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As to the similarity to holding tanks and a ceptic tank, they both hold toilet waste. Yes, there is some processing in a home's ceptic tank which eventually gets pumped out. Gees, that is exactly what goes on in my boat's holding tank including use of fresh water.

Nope. Septic tanks are designed to function anaerobically (without oxygen). It's only when organic matter breaks down anaerobically that it can generate stinky gasses--hydrogen sulfide and sulfur dioxide--which are highly toxic, even lethal in concentration--and methane, which is also lethal, but actually odorless. But when organic matter breaks down aerobically (oxygenated), it converts to CO2, which is odorless. Stagnant swamps stink because the water in 'em doesn't flow causing pond scum to form on the surface "suffocating" it. Running rivers and streams don't because they're naturally aerated Compost piles have to be tossed to aerate them...if they're allowed to sit and compact, they rot...and stink. You'll never see a still pond in an office building or mall...they all have fountains and waterfalls--not just for decoration, those are necessary to keep the water from stagnating...and stinking.
So the key to odor PREVENTION is oxygen. The goal onboard is to create an AEROBIC environment in the tank. In most tanks, that can be accomplished by simply increasing ventilation above the surface. When that's not possible, an aeration system is usually the answer.

This is all in my book in greater detail (reviewed and approved by the bio-chemist at the local sewage treatment plant, btw) if you're interested learning more.Available as hard copy or a kindle (see link in my signature).

I am lost to see how my anti stink air filter stuck into my tanks vent does any harm to anything but does a lot of good by preventing stink.

It doesn't do any harm to anything but your wallet, but it doesn't prevent odor, it only BLOCKS odor--and by doing that it impedes the exchange of air needed to prevent it. If it ever gets wet, it can block the vent completely, pressurizing the system and preventing the tank from being pumped out.

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Old 08-21-2017, 02:44 PM   #86
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Wesk---

I will keep my carbon filter, you do as YOU wish. Thank you very much
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Old 08-21-2017, 04:39 PM   #87
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Gee, that saved me from making any suggestions about what you should do with your carbon filter...then I wouldn't have to type anything...wait...
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Old 08-22-2017, 06:00 AM   #88
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"Their biggest problem is the sludge build up."

One would think by now they have trained the Na's and boat assemblers to install a bottom pump out point , (as RV use) in the black tank.
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Old 08-22-2017, 06:05 AM   #89
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Wesk---

I will keep my carbon filter, you do as YOU wish. Thank you very much
You're welcome!
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Old 08-22-2017, 06:07 AM   #90
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"Their biggest problem is the sludge build up."

One would think by now they have trained the Na's and boat assemblers to install a bottom pump out point , (as RV use) in the black tank.
The outlet in a holding tank is at the bottom. You couldn't pump it out from the top, you would be sucking air.
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Old 08-22-2017, 02:42 PM   #91
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"The outlet in a holding tank is at the bottom. You couldn't pump it out from the top, you would be sucking air."

Depends on how deep the suction pipe is.
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Old 08-22-2017, 03:37 PM   #92
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The outlet in a holding tank is at the bottom. You couldn't pump it out from the top, you would be sucking air.
Discharge fittings in the top of a tank, with a pickup tube inside the tank that goes to the bottom, are actually quite common because they eliminate standing sewage in the line from a fitting at the bottom of a tank. It requires at least 5" clearance above the tank, though, so it's not always possible.

However, what FF referred to, and what RV tanks have, is a discharge outlet IN the bottom of a tank. RV tanks aren't pumped out, they're dumped into inground storage tanks at "dump stations" in RV parks. Owners can install a system that washes down the inside of the tank walls...and in so doing, that also washes out the sludge in the bottom.

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Old 08-23-2017, 05:57 AM   #93
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" RV tanks aren't pumped out, they're dumped into inground storage tanks at "dump stations" in RV parks."

Yes that is what most folks do.

Others attach a macerator pump , have a 1 inch hose and can empty their tanks at home or visiting friends.

The delight of the RV setup is if a good shut off valve is chosen the either a simple hose for gravity discharge or a macerator pump can be installed with zero mess ,and almost no effort.

The RV folks frequently will chose a 120V pump (run from their inverter) which seems to have a far longer life than the 12v DC stuff..

The bottom , wet discharge is far easier to keep operating than a lift setup where dried gunk and paper can easily stop the suction .

While there are $10.valves at the RV store , sending off for good ones is worth the effort.

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Old 08-23-2017, 10:14 AM   #94
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Discharge fittings in the top of a tank, with a pickup tube inside the tank that goes to the bottom, are actually quite common because they eliminate standing sewage in the line from a fitting at the bottom of a tank. It requires at.........
That is still at the bottom of the tank. The difference is, the tube is inside the tank so you can't see it, you have to imagine it.

Mine is on the outside on the side but at the bottom. I understand the point about standing sewage in the hose. I've thought of installing a piece of PVC tubing on the outside to the top level of the tank and connecting the hose to that but there are issues with that and I haven't really had a problem so it's just a thought for "someday".
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