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Old 12-13-2019, 03:36 PM   #81
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I don’t know much about wood boats. What i’ve learned from my boat neighbors in my marina is that they are labors of love. Most have hundreds if not thousands of hours of labor and the projects are far from complete. It seems that the deeper you get the more problems that you find. If you have years of labor available, a reasonable pocket full of money, and the desire to take on a project that may span years then certainly go for it. Just don’t delude yourself into believing it will be an investment that will yield a positive financial outcome at the end.
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Old 12-13-2019, 04:23 PM   #82
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Unless one is absurdly wealthy, the very idea of attempting to preserve a 65 foot wood boat without EXTENSIVE knowledge and direct experience is utter folly.

It's "this old house" to the nth degree.
What Sabre says. Unless you have really deep pockets, walk away. This will run 6 figures in the blink of an eye
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Old 12-13-2019, 05:40 PM   #83
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I would start with a good stiff out of the water survey and then start figuring costs. You could easily get into 6 figures, maybe even high 6 figures! She is probably carvel planked I would stick to that. Hopefully she has been refastened a time or two below the water line.
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Old 12-13-2019, 05:57 PM   #84
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The only advice I could add is perhaps look for a smaller wood boat to gain some experience. Big Boat =Big Problem. I frogged around on an old Chris Craft Connie and learned a bunch and ended up with a decent "user" boat.
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Old 12-13-2019, 08:34 PM   #85
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It can be done...

I bought a 40' wood trawler a year ago. I highly recommend a book by Jim Trefethen: Wooden boat renovation. His book was the inspiration for my adventure. I had very little woodworking experience, but plenty of mechanical. I was able to enjoy this boat all summer with my family. It's an enormous amount of work, but we got a pretty good size boat on the water for a reasonable price. Yes, I used 5200, West, Tar. Whatever it took! I'll never see any return on this boat... but who cares! My kids are on the water and won't ever forget the experience!!

65' would be a little intimidating to me... but if you know what you are getting into... go for it!
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Old 12-13-2019, 08:34 PM   #86
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The reason why you cannot use “modern techniques “ on wooden blanked (and it most certainly is due to its vintage” is that wood planks move. They swell up and shrink whereas the new epoxies. Etc do not resulting in eventual separation of the planks and fiberglass. They then rot from the inside out. You might be better off preserving pieces of it like the helm in memory of your grand parent.
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Old 12-13-2019, 09:39 PM   #87
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As others have mentioned...refastening.
While, for certain, it has been done once before, maybe even twice, there is the possibility it needs to be done again.
Just to buy the screws could be anywhere from $5-10,000. And the labor? Let's just say, a whole lot more.
Like I said earlier, fixing up this boat will quickly hit 6 figures and like the Ever-Ready bunny, just keeps going and going and.....
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Old 12-13-2019, 10:11 PM   #88
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A few comments: I used to hang out at Fellows and Stuart--when my dad's 26' wooden boat was docked fairly close to F &.S. (A friend surveyed this boat built in 1935, and told me it was in excellent condition) She was Port Orford Cedar on Oak frames--most of which were massive for a boat that size. My dad refastened her with Silicone Bronze screws. Most of the yachts that Fellows and Stuart built were strong and had good reputations, if cared for.

A close friend did glass his 30 foot sailboat (Built in 1928) and sailed it from Calif. to the Med and back. As soon as he got back, he started a 4 year full time restoration of the boat. He has owned wooden boats all of his life, and this one over 50 years...He replaced plank by plank sistered some frames, but most were built new.

I owned a 62 foot fiberglass ketch. There were two schooners: Rose of Sharon and Land Fall. on each side. The owners were replacing planks every year.

We stayed at the German Kiel Yacht Club, which was run by the British Royal engineers and there were 10 eight meter sloops built for and used in the 1936 Olympics. These were taken as war prizes by the Brits. The boats had been hidden during WWII and survived pretty much intact, but a bit worse for the wear/war. These 8 meters were being used for R & R by the Royal Engineers, in Kiel (1984). Only one was going to be scrapped. It was the only one which had been sheathed in glass and epoxy. Dry rot had attacked enough of the interior frames, and planks, they felt it was not restorable. The rest were being sailed on a seasonal basis. Above the water, the wood planks had to "breath" swell and contract. Putting on glass does not allow this to occur.

The 65 foot boat may be viable. If the boat is on the West Coast, you live in Miami, shipping (probably best is on its own bottom, but one of the yacht transport vessels, might undertake it--if a very special cradle were built. I doubt it would survive, with the normal supports of steel which are welded to the transport ship's deck, which would not give enough support to an older hull.

The key is finding a surveyor who is really knowledgeable on wooden boats. Not a lot of them left....Good luck if you do forward.
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Old 12-13-2019, 10:35 PM   #89
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I'm guessing since the OP hasn't responded in 4-5 days, he got the message that everyone was trying to get thru to him and is passing on this project
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Old 12-13-2019, 10:45 PM   #90
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Either that or he's not impressed with T.F. due to content of some postings.
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Old 12-14-2019, 12:43 AM   #91
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Seeing it's a family boat he sure seems to want to save, I bet he's weighing all options.

Maybe licking wounds of finding the boat's restoration sounds not as simple as hoped.
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Old 12-14-2019, 01:08 AM   #92
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I watched as someone spent 400,000 restoring The hull of a 65 foot wood Cruiser. Neglected for years, it had some rotten frames, dozens of planks replaced as well as 15 feet of the bow.

It made sense to the owner as the topsides were good and a similar new boat would cost roughly 2 million. It didn’t make any sense to me, nor anyone else in the boatyard.
So he spent about $400k vs $2mill so saved $1.5 mill and that makes no sense?
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Old 12-14-2019, 03:49 AM   #93
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The may be a bit off the wall, but what about using the existing hull as a plug, layup over it to create a mold, the n layup a new FRP hull. Then move the innards over, abandoning the old hull?

Or just layup a new hull over the existing one, and leave the old one in place.
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Old 12-14-2019, 09:38 AM   #94
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Anyone who loves wooden boats should read this thread on the wooden boat forum. First, and perhaps foremost, the boat owner is a very gifted writer. (I’ve read it 3 different times) It chronicles an attempt to restore a classic Huckins in a remarkable way that captures the thrill of the dream and the sobering reality that both accompany such an ambitious project.

Perihelion - a story of hubris, failure... and redemption?
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Old 12-14-2019, 03:36 PM   #95
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Anyone who loves wooden boats should read this thread on the wooden boat forum. First, and perhaps foremost, the boat owner is a very gifted writer. (I’ve read it 3 different times) It chronicles an attempt to restore a classic Huckins in a remarkable way that captures the thrill of the dream and the sobering reality that both accompany such an ambitious project.

Perihelion - a story of hubris, failure... and redemption?
OMG - I read that entire Perihelion story.

Having been around, worked on, and owned wood boats for decades of years ago... I have deep, deep empathy. Anyone who purchases an old wood boat with intent to "Bring Her Back To Her Original Glory" should read this story! Be careful what you buy and be careful what you plan to accomplish. Restoring an old wood boat can EAT YOU ALIVE - In More Ways Than One!!
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Old 12-14-2019, 05:12 PM   #96
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True, we have not heard back from the OP. He admitted in the first post it needed hull restoration. He also said it's floating and it runs. We have no idea of his financial capacity. But if it had been my grandfathers boat, I sure would want to give it a shot. I wish him good luck. Pictures please.
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Old 12-15-2019, 01:21 PM   #97
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But if it had been my grandfathers boat, I sure would want to give it a shot.
Don't think I agree. Sentiment aside, thinking about my GF's boat, The Troublemaker, it was a big old wood piece of junk. Right now it is fully decomposed and raising a new generation of trees and shrubs in someone's backyard
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Old 12-15-2019, 01:52 PM   #98
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Don't think I agree. Sentiment aside, thinking about my GF's boat, The Troublemaker, it was a big old wood piece of junk. Right now it is fully decomposed and raising a new generation of trees and shrubs in someone's backyard


If it in that shape I would agree. But his sounded in better shape, ie “floating and running”.
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Old 12-15-2019, 06:23 PM   #99
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If it in that shape I would agree. But his sounded in better shape, ie “floating and running”.


But that’s setting a pretty low bar.
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