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Old 12-06-2019, 09:49 PM   #21
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Old 12-06-2019, 10:06 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by Sn0wb0ard24 View Post
Is a Fellows and Stewart a well built boat?
My marine surveyor's answer would be, "It doesn't matter. Beyond a certain number of years, how a boat was cared for and maintained matters more than how it was built." That's especially true for a wooden boat.

My first boat was a twenty-foot wooden sailing catamaran. I sailed the hell out of her for three years, and then worked on her for another three years. After selling her to another dreamer, I foreswore any more wooden boats. For the past thirty-five-plus years, I have remained faithful to my vow.

But, I am an ordinary mortal. There are supermen, like our TF colleague "Swampu," who have fearlessly tackled old wooden boat restoration projects and lived to not only tell the tale but to show off the magnificent results. See:

http://www.trawlerforum.com/forums/s...fire-5451.html
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Old 12-06-2019, 10:23 PM   #23
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Old 12-06-2019, 11:05 PM   #24
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If you have not worked on a wood boat before, buy a small wood boat that needs restoration. Not a plywood bost but a traditionally built one.

If you are able to complete the restoration, go on to the 65.

I restored a few wood sailboats in the 16' to 25' range. Cured me of wanting to purchase and restore a wood trawler.
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Old 12-07-2019, 03:24 AM   #25
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That's better !! More gifs from you Mr RT Firefly plz.
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Old 12-07-2019, 07:19 AM   #26
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cost estimates?

Use the hull as a plug to create a female mold , then get help and build a new GRP hull.

Move every thing from the old boat into the new hull, but upgrade plumbing ,wiring etc.

At least after years of work , the finished boat will have value.

Plan B is ignore everything that wont sink you, patch as you can and enjoy the trip as long as it lasts.
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Old 12-07-2019, 08:02 AM   #27
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Sn0wb0ard24 I'm gunna give you my best answer, assuming that your heart is set on a wood boat, and not just because that boat is cheap or free.

Buy a ticket to India or Vietnam or Indonesia or Pakistan. You can have built a brand new 40'+ heavy fishing trawler out of a good wood (like jackfruit), with engine and a clean interior (but not yacht level) for about $125k. Brand new and no crap inside like that 80 year old monstrosity.

I lived overseas in Asia/Middle East for more than a decade and visited so many shipyards I can't count them. It's doable, but you have to get out of your armchair and dust off your passport.
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Old 12-07-2019, 08:51 AM   #28
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Thank you all for your valuable, experienced, and sage advice. Very, very much appreciated.
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Old 12-07-2019, 09:36 AM   #29
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Originally Posted by Sn0wb0ard24 View Post
Thank you all for your valuable, experienced, and sage advice. Very, very much appreciated.
YW - From us all - I'm sure!

So, please do tell...

What is your decision looking like; re to own or not to own said old wooden boat??
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Old 12-07-2019, 09:40 AM   #30
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wow, you guys really know how to stomp on a dream But I tend to agree that an old wood boat could be a nightmare.
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Old 12-07-2019, 09:45 AM   #31
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The only good way to restore a wooden hull is to repair the existing hull with new wood. All I can say is go over every inch of the boat inside and out to assess its condition. ALL soft/rotted wood you find will have to be replaced. Planking stock should ideally be clear vertical grain wood. Depending on what wood was used for the original construction, that sort of planking stock can range from expensive to outrageously expensive. If you have reasonable wood working skills you can do the repairs yourself IF you have a place to do them. However, a 65 footer will be built from relatively large bits of wood (minimum 2" thick planking stock, etc.) which can be a bit of a chore to work with.


Beyond the wood, you need to find out how the planks are fastened. In other words (iron boat nails, galvanized boat nails, galvanized screws, bronze screws, copper rivets, etc.) and if the hull was ever refastened. If it has been refastened, you need to find out if the same material as the original fastenings was used. In the worst case you will need to completely refasten the hull below the waterline while removing ALL old fastenings so that the hull below the waterline has only one type of fastening. I suggest bronze wood screws. They will only cost you a couple of bucks each and you will only need 10,000 or so.


Restoring an old wooden boat can be a big job. If you do it yourself you can probably do a good job for under $100,000 exclusive of any work on the drive train. If you hire a restoration done the sky is the limit with a floor in the $500K range. After a complete restoration including rebuilding the engines the boat will be worth maybe $150K.


Just the thoughts of a guy who owns and maintains a 1936 wooden boat (see avatar pic).
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Old 12-07-2019, 09:52 AM   #32
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I will proceed cautiously with surveys from experts with experience in repairing or rebuilding this type of boat from this boat builder; in order to prepare a realistic budget. I was hoping that someone might have experience with a simple modern method of repairing an old wooden boat hull to last another 20 years. I would be open to anything. Marine plywood, coating of 5200? pressure treated wood? I have a certain obligation to consider all options for this boat. It was originally built for my great grandfather. I am not able to simply walk away without considering all options.
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Old 12-07-2019, 09:58 AM   #33
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All of the work would be done by experienced professionals. At this point I do not care about "authentic" restoration; but rather utilizing the most modern options available. Stainless screws, modern epoxies, chemically treated wood components, etc. I want the boat to have a solid chance to survive. I understand that there would never be a return on any money spent.
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Old 12-07-2019, 10:41 AM   #34
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Greetings,
Mr. S. Ah. A family history. THAT changes things considerably but NOT the costs involved, unfortunately. Keep Mr. TD's post (#31) strongly in mind if and when you embark on, at least, a stabilization of her current state.


Do you have a link or any reference where TF members might get a better idea of her current condition and what may be involved? Pictures would help immensely.
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Old 12-07-2019, 11:01 AM   #35
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This "Family" boat is wet at the moment; is it not?

Does it run? How long since its last outing?

If it were me... I'd do careful inspection of the hull - see post # 16 [maybe even hire a "knowledgeable in wood" older boat yard worker for assistance].

If it seems worthy - I might get the engine[s] fired up and take a gentle cruise... to feel her bones.

From that point I'd make my decision.

Please realize... there is no correct, fast, inexpensive way to repair/refurbish/restabilize an old wooden hull to get it into good enough condition for seaworthy trips. That said... if it pleases you and if you can get it hauled, you could simply do patch work that makes her sound enough [non leaking enough] as a "Dock Queen" who never leaves the slip. She might last for a couple decades or more that way.
Good Luck!
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Old 12-07-2019, 11:12 AM   #36
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This is a fun thread. We NEED pictures and what you intend to pay for the boat. Don't be afraid of anyone sneaking in and taking it from under you, it's pretty obvious any person on this forum is not interested.

If you are young and rich, go for it. If you are old and broke you should know better, or have already attempted an old wooden boat restoration.

Of course everyone is right. There is only one way to properly restore an old plank boat, that is one plank and one rib at a time. When and if you finish it will last one hell of a lot longer than another 20 years.

IMHO the only way to attempt a job like this is to get the boat in your own garage/barn/backyard. It will never be completed if you have to travel to a yard, not to mention the additional expense.

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Old 12-07-2019, 12:21 PM   #37
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"The difference between ordeal and adventure is ATTITUDE!"

"Experience is what you get only after you needed it."

- Bob Bitchin

Two great quotes that on the surface may seem somewhat contradictory, both apply in this case. If one keeps the right attitude the entire process can be quite the unparalleled, satisfying adventure.

But experience (other people's wood boat specific, professional experience!) is something you will need to heavily rely on in order to keep your attitude from spiraling into potentially suicidal depression...
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Old 12-07-2019, 12:25 PM   #38
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I still say some one is pulling your leg here. Stainless steel screws in a wood boat? Treated lumber?
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Old 12-07-2019, 12:33 PM   #39
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I am serious. What is wrong with stainless? Thank you all for your patience.
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Old 12-07-2019, 12:38 PM   #40
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From your questions it seems that you may be inexperienced in dealing with wood boat repair. This is a very big project to learn on. All education is expensive but this more than most.
Reread the post above that tells you that most yards will not haul wood boats these days.
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