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Old 12-17-2021, 03:45 PM   #41
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Does a humidifier make sense with a wet bilge?

I don't know if this question is hijacking this thread. If it is the mods can move it.

I have a wet bilge so there is always water in the boat. I also have a full winter cover, (Lohman cover) from October to March/April. I leave the port holes open to enhance air flow.

Vancouver is pretty wet at the best of times in winter, so there is a lot of humidity. Would a humidifier in such a wet environment be worth it?
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Old 12-17-2021, 03:56 PM   #42
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If you can shut the boat up pretty tight, and keep the bilge covered, a dehumidifier may help. The boat is kept in the water? Where is it leaking so that the bilge stays wet?

If you leave the ports open, or the flooded bilge is open to the cabin, running a dehumidifier may be a waste of time. The dehumidifier will dry out the bilge over a week or two, but not if water continues to leak in.
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Old 12-17-2021, 04:34 PM   #43
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If I was to get a humidifier I could crank up my stuffing box. I used to do that in the winter but Iíve gotten lazy on a few things.
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Old 12-17-2021, 05:39 PM   #44
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Having lived in Southern California, 6 miles inland without a/c in the house Iíve had issues with electrical outlets corroding, fixtures corroding and electrical panel CB corrosion.. same thing in So Florida, though in south FL I had A/C. All the boats Iíve had required regularly maintenance to stay ahead of the salt, both inside and out.
Yes, thanks, that was the concern. Now we've found out there are about 3, or even 4 different air handler systems, some better than others at taking out the salt. Ill find out which is the best.
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Old 12-17-2021, 05:48 PM   #45
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Air handlers are designed to move air around. That's all that they do. They don't heat up or cool down, they move air. Air conditioners, on the other hand, exist only to cool air by removing heat from the outdoor air.


https://www.goodmanmfg.com/resources...an-air-handler
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Old 12-17-2021, 06:01 PM   #46
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Air handlers are designed to move air around. That's all that they do. They don't heat up or cool down, they move air. Air conditioners, on the other hand, exist only to cool air by removing heat from the outdoor air.


https://www.goodmanmfg.com/resources...an-air-handler
Modern, marine, HVAC....does it all...even removes mold, bacteria, etc. They've got it down.
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Old 12-17-2021, 06:56 PM   #47
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Modern, marine, HVAC....does it all...even removes mold, bacteria, etc. They've got it down.

Please provide a link to what you are talking about.


I recently researched the market and installed 3 air conditioners on my boat.


I seem to have missed all the great things in marine "air handlers" you are referring to.


The term air handler only refers to a component, not a system.
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Old 12-17-2021, 07:11 PM   #48
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Please provide a link to what you are talking about.


I recently researched the market and installed 3 air conditioners on my boat.


I seem to have missed all the great things in marine "air handlers" you are referring to.


The term air handler only refers to a component, not a system.
Here are a few you missed in your research.....there are many more that supply any sort of marine HVAC you could need. https://heinenhopman.com/en/markets/...dition-yachts/. https://www.teknotherm.no/.........https://www.bronswerkgroup.com/hvacr...vac-r-systems/
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Old 12-17-2021, 07:44 PM   #49
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Water vapor

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How does it work with marine dehumidifiers/air handlers? They take out moisture, but what about all the salt in the air? Our new boat will be tightly closed most of the time.
Dehumidifiers remove water vapor, which is essentially distilled water. There is no salt in water vapor. Very fine spray particles may contain salt but I don't believe any Dehumidifier would remove salt spray. That would need to be filtered. 🤔⛵⛵🛳😊
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Old 12-17-2021, 07:50 PM   #50
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Dehumidifiers remove water vapor, which is essentially distilled water. There is no salt in water vapor. Very fine spray particles may contain salt but I don't believe any Dehumidifier would remove salt spray. That would need to be filtered. ��⛵⛵����
'may contain salt'? everybody that lives near , or on the sea knows the air contains lots of salt. And modern marine hvac systems can extract it/filter it out.
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Old 12-17-2021, 08:01 PM   #51
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Originally Posted by grahamdouglass View Post
I don't know if this question is hijacking this thread. If it is the mods can move it.



I have a wet bilge so there is always water in the boat. I also have a full winter cover, (Lohman cover) from October to March/April. I leave the port holes open to enhance air flow.



Vancouver is pretty wet at the best of times in winter, so there is a lot of humidity. Would a humidifier in such a wet environment be worth it?

Graham, my over 40 years experience has been with boats sitting in the water year round in Puget Sound. Just because I have years of experience, doesnít necessarily mean I have been doing it correctly all this time, however.

I have found that using a dehumidifier makes a huge difference in reducing the moister, mold, and mildew and increasing the comfort in the boat during the 3 wet seasons. What Iíve found to be the most effective is a compressor type of dehumidifier in the main cabin that drains into a galley sink and then something to cause the air to be circulated into the other parts of the boat. However, even the small compressor types of dehumidifiers are relatively heavy and not always easy to store.

I have also used multiple small peltier dehumidifiers. They are quieter and easier to move and store. I have found that they are not nearly as effective as they compressor type but they have been ďgood enoughĒ. I also have found them to be less reliable. Iíve never had a compressor dehumidify fail on me, so far Iím 2 for 3 with the small peltier dehumidifiers. Only one is still functional.

I just ordered a desiccant dehumidifier yesterday. It is the type have uses a bit of heat to remove the moisture from rotating panels that are coated with a desiccant. It should be lighter in weight, and quieter than the compressor types. Iíll see how it works out.

Anyway, in your situation when you keep your boat covered, Ií would just use a small compressor dehumidifier and have it drain into a galley sink. I would also see what you can do to remove more water from your bilge. If you canít stop the leaking, consider using a micro bilge pump such as ďdry bilgeĒ to remove most of the water from the bilge and keep it out.

Just my opinion base on my experience. Your experience may vary.
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Old 12-18-2021, 07:03 AM   #52
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"If I was to get a humidifier I could crank up my stuffing box."

A simple" Plan B " might be a copper tube to the stuffing box and a cup or other grease fitting.

Very little effort to stop the dripping, till next boat use.
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Old 12-18-2021, 07:47 AM   #53
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In any case on boats with modern air handlets the humitity can be set to whatever one likes best.
This really piqued my interest. Just like the A/C display, I could set the % humidity? What model units do this? I got rid of my dehumidifier lacking space to store it but, wishing I hadnít.

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Here are a few you missed in your research.....there are many more that supply any sort of marine HVAC you could need. https://heinenhopman.com/en/markets/...dition-yachts/. https://www.teknotherm.no/.........https://www.bronswerkgroup.com/hvacr...vac-r-systems/
I scoured both those sites and there was a dearth of specs. Everything was obviously oriented and marketed to commercial and super/mega yacht size boats. What few things I did see like a self contained unit- a minimum of 188 kg. A few other pieces of equipment operating at 460 VAC. Iíll go out on limb and suggest that no oneís boat here operates at 460 volts.

While the tech may exist, it appears little is aimed toward smaller recreational boats, the focus of this forum. Like psneeld, I have a 40í boat with 3 self-contained A/C units. That configuration probably represents most of the boats discussed on this forum with a few split systems thrown in. Fresh air ventilation, air purification, humidity control all bundled up into one? Sign me up if such a thing exists for us and can fit in available space.

It sounds like youíre looking a larger boat that may avail itself of commercial equipment and thatís interesting but not exactly practical for some of us. I nonetheless look forward to hearing about the specific products you have chosen and specíd and opportunities for downsizing to the smaller boat segment.
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Old 12-18-2021, 08:17 AM   #54
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This really piqued my interest. Just like the A/C display, I could set the % humidity? What model units do this? I got rid of my dehumidifier lacking space to store it but, wishing I hadn’t.



I scoured both those sites and there was a dearth of specs. Everything was obviously oriented and marketed to commercial and super/mega yacht size boats. What few things I did see like a self contained unit- a minimum of 188 kg. A few other pieces of equipment operating at 460 VAC. I’ll go out on limb and suggest that no one’s boat here operates at 460 volts.

While the tech may exist, it appears little is aimed toward smaller recreational boats, the focus of this forum. Like psneeld, I have a 40’ boat with 3 self-contained A/C units. That configuration probably represents most of the boats discussed on this forum with a few split systems thrown in. Fresh air ventilation, air purification, humidity control all bundled up into one? Sign me up if such a thing exists for us and can fit in available space.

It sounds like you’re looking a larger boat that may avail itself of commercial equipment and that’s interesting but not exactly practical for some of us. I nonetheless look forward to hearing about the specific products you have chosen and spec’d and opportunities for downsizing to the smaller boat segment.

Like many people who know boating through the internet...there is a big disconnect into their dreams and realities.


I too looked over those sites...can't believe the one on expedition yachts didn't grab my attention, after all I own a '88 Taiwan beast, I must be one of the very few here with such a tiny archaic boat.


For the unlimited budget....sure anything can be done. Even watermakers are neanderthal compared to NASAs ability to recycle your own wastes for the right price.
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Old 12-18-2021, 09:18 AM   #55
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Porgy, you looked at 'both' citations? There were three. Here is a forth one, https://premaberg.com/, another one that says they will cater to the specific needs of you and your boat. That some people cant afford modern hvac systems is a seperate issue. I too often feel like I deserve more in life.
But the issue is resolved, the salt content of of onboard air can be treated, just as moisture level, and other air concerns.
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Old 12-18-2021, 09:23 AM   #56
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Psneeld, thanks for conceding that my research found what yours didnt. From one of the 4 requested citations, they even mention their technique, "How moisture separators work



"At the heart of a Premaberg separation and filtration product is a bank of inertial vertical vanes. Their design causes the incoming air to take a tortuous path setting up inertial forces resulting in impingement of the moisture droplets on the vane bodies.

Each vane has multiple changes in direction and multiple catchment pockets to trap the moisture droplets separated by impingement.

These droplets drain vertically downwards to a catchment trough underneath the vane section.

Additional stages of separation and/or filtration may be added depending on individual requirements."
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Old 12-18-2021, 09:47 AM   #57
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I may have conceded something, but your guess is way off.


Happy fantasies!
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Old 12-18-2021, 09:47 AM   #58
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Having lived in Southern California, 6 miles inland without a/c in the house Iíve had issues with electrical outlets corroding, fixtures corroding and electrical panel CB corrosion.. same thing in So Florida, though in south FL I had A/C. All the boats Iíve had required regularly maintenance to stay ahead of the salt, both inside and out.
Exactly , its a big concern for many, in various ways.
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Old 12-18-2021, 09:51 AM   #59
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In addition to the corrosivness of salty/humid air on materials, there are also various adverse effects on certain peoples bodies, it makes some people feel slimy, and as mentioned above, affects hair, a major contributor of the ill-temperament of some of our admirals. Here is a citation for that too: "Salt can create some volume and remove oil, but on the flip side, it can be very harmful,” says Mia Emilio, senior stylist at Devachan Salon. “We have to think about the adverse effects of our styling agents ... You have to decide if achieving volume is worth the price of dry, dull, and matted hair.”

Turns out whether you’re spritzing a salt spray or taking an actual dip in the ocean, salt works the same way: It pulls oils and natural moisture out. But if too much moisture is lost, the result is parched, brittle locks.

"In its worst form, salt water damage causes the ends of the hair to split, and breakage can begin,” says Elizabeth Cunnane Phillips, trichologist at Philip Kingsley"
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Old 12-18-2021, 09:53 AM   #60
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And......... ""Your hair's water content is what makes it stretchy, elastic and moisturized -- kind of like your skin. And, similar to your skin and the rest of your body, your hair can become 'dehydrated' and dry if too much moisture is lost through evaporation. And even more so if that moisture is not replenished," said Elizabeth Cunnane Phillips, trichologist at Philip Kingsley. "As the sea has high salt content, it is osmotic, meaning that it leaches water out of your hair. The result? Dry, parched and brittle locks."
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