Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 09-07-2020, 11:24 PM   #1
Newbie
 
City: Los Angeles
Country: US
Vessel Name: Mahalo
Vessel Model: CT-35 Trawler
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 1
windlass slipping lost anchor

Dropped anchor in what my depth gauge told me it was 60 ft. Only the second time I've dropped anchor on the trawler that I have owned for a little over two years. No marking on the chain so I really have no idea how much was let out.
Decided to weigh in the anchor and the chain started slipping over the gypsy wheel and ran away. Lost it all. What did I do wrong?
__________________
Advertisement

Herb Ault is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2020, 11:40 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Slowmo's Avatar
 
City: Lafayette, CA
Country: United States
Vessel Name: Esprit
Vessel Model: 40' Tollycraft tricabin diesel
Join Date: Oct 2018
Posts: 175
Was it jumping over the gypsy or was the clutch loose? I like to have the tail end of the rode secured in the anchor locker.
__________________

Slowmo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2020, 11:57 PM   #3
Guru
 
motion30's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 1,010
First thing that was done wrong is the end of the chain was not secured to the boat
motion30 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2020, 12:08 AM   #4
Guru
 
bligh's Avatar
 
City: Santa Cruz, CA
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Frisky
Vessel Model: 99 Nordic Tug
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 1,385
Yes the chain should be secured to the boat with a piece of appropriate sized line so it can be cut away with a knife in an emergency.
Quote:
Originally Posted by motion30 View Post
First thing that was done wrong is the end of the chain was not secured to the boat
bligh is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2020, 01:09 AM   #5
Guru
 
BruceK's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 11,363
Apart from the end of the rode not being attached to the boat, the rest is unclear. You anchored, the rode presumably did not keep running out while anchored, so was held in place somehow. If the gypsy clutch was loose I`d expect running out while at anchor,barring a calm millpond. Was the chain set into the gypsy, does/did the chain fit the gypsy,chain lost we may never know. Did someone loosen the gypsy clutch?
Now, you`ll need to replace the chain, and the anchor. May I suggest.....
__________________
BruceK
2005 Integrity 386 "Sojourn"
Sydney Australia
BruceK is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2020, 01:12 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
City: Long Beach
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Checkmate
Vessel Model: GB 42
Join Date: Dec 2018
Posts: 115
I hadnít anchored since purchasing my GB 42 but was told about 200 ft of chain on board. Not wanting to have a similar situation I recently pulled out all of the chain and nylon rode on board and laid it on the dock. I discovered three things,

1. I really do have 200 ft of chain in reasonably good condition.

2. I have 150 ft of nylon rode attached to the chain.

3. Most importantly all of the above is secured to the boat.

Iím happy to be sure that all is good when I decide to anchor.
__________________
Jim Nance
T210DRVR is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2020, 04:22 AM   #7
Guru
 
High Wire's Avatar
 
City: Cape May, NJ and Englewood, FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Irish Lady
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 3,422
Welcome aboard.
We still don’t know what windlass model or chain size that you have.
If the chain slips then it’s mismatched to the windlass, doesn’t have a full 270 degrees of contact, or maybe something is blocking the chain from going down into the chain locker. Could be worn teeth but doubt it. Anchoring in 50 feet does not happen much here on the East Coast.
__________________
Archie
Irish Lady
1984 Monk 36 Hull #46
Currently in New Jersey.
High Wire is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2020, 04:27 AM   #8
Guru
 
City: Hughesville, MD
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Branwen
Vessel Model: Hatteras 48 LRC
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 641
Welcome to the forum, and I'm sorry this happened to you!

There are many of these 'gotchas' in boating that seem so obvious after they've gotten you. In addition to the wise advice found throughout this forum, I had boating mentors who warned me about this specific gotcha and others that they often helped me check or made sure were on my To Do List. Make a friend or friends nearby and talk boating with them.

May your next outing be more pleasant!

Greg.
GregBrannon is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2020, 07:17 AM   #9
Guru
 
City: gulf coast
Country: pinellas
Join Date: Jun 2014
Posts: 3,141
Call a diver to recover the equipment.
bayview is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2020, 07:26 AM   #10
Guru
 
menzies's Avatar
 
City: Jacksonville
Country: USA
Vessel Name: SONAS
Vessel Model: Grand Alaskan 53
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 6,629
If you took a mark on your chartplotter or know pretty much where you were the less costly way would be to get a diver as suggested above.

It sounds like you haven't touched the windlass since this happened. so you should be able to go to the boat and check if you had the clutch tightened. (Find an online manual on your windlass if you haven't got one showing you how to do this).

The clutch is loosened when you want to free fall your anchor. If you had understood what was happening you could probably have tightened it enough to stop the fall there and then. The clutch would usually have been tight since the chain was on board, but it could have been loosened somehow since last use.

Also look to see where your pawl(s) is. If it was safe enough to engage while the chain was running out that could have been another option - especially if it is a riding pawl.

Good luck
menzies is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2020, 08:13 AM   #11
Guru
 
City: Canaveral
Country: USA
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 1,803
I agree, most likely the clutch was partially-tightened so it held fine with just a small amount of chain out, but at some point the heavy weight resulted in free fall. You could have tightened the wheel or brake at that time when it was running out.

However it is possible that the clutch is worn and needs to be rebuilt.

Regarding to fastening the bitter end, don't do like what the PO did on my boat and weld the last link to the stem bar! Assuming your boat is fiberglass, just make sure the nylon trailer is long enough to reach the deck plus a few feet, and that you have a knife handy somewhere (on flybridge, inside the deckhouse, etc.) because in a crazy, stressful emergency it is tough to think clearly, yet it is vital to act fast.
makobuilders is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2020, 09:53 AM   #12
Guru
 
hollywood8118's Avatar
 
City: Port Townsend Washington
Country: USA
Vessel Name: " OTTER "
Vessel Model: Ocean Alexander Europa 40
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 1,970
Quote:
Originally Posted by Herb Ault View Post
Dropped anchor in what my depth gauge told me it was 60 ft. Only the second time I've dropped anchor on the trawler that I have owned for a little over two years. No marking on the chain so I really have no idea how much was let out.
Decided to weigh in the anchor and the chain started slipping over the gypsy wheel and ran away. Lost it all. What did I do wrong?



Herb,
First of all welcome to the forum.
You will get some pretty scathing comments from the group here for the anchoring incident.. try to learn from all the comments and don't feel too bad for what happened... ALL OF US HERE have done something along those lines in our years of boating.
The big lesson learned here is about being prepared, knowing how much chain you have, having it secured on the bitter end, having it well marked, using it in shallow water first to practice etc.

60' you must of been out at Catalina?. You may get lucky to retrieve it if you had a really good position where it went over.. but it may be gone by the time you have someone there to get it. My suggestion is to purchase a new anchor setup, mark it all out prior to taking it and installing it aboard and connect it to the boat with 20' of rope that can be cut away in a emergency. Move past it and move forward.


HOLLYWOOD
hollywood8118 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2020, 10:02 AM   #13
Guru
 
City: Carefree, Arizona
Country: usa
Vessel Name: sunchaser V
Vessel Model: DeFever 48
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 8,834
On our Maxwell vertical windlass the chain has on several occasions jumped off the chain section and ridden up to the rope section. Then all 300 feet raced to the bottom, stopped by the stout bitter end. A well placed chain stopper will prevent this over ride.

For us, the problem is too little distance between the windlass and the anchor shank resulting in the chain rising too much when the anchor breaks over the bow roller. Each vessel is different and many lessons get learned when anchoring. For many years now I clip a short line onto the chain and affix it to the boat prior to the last 3' of anchor retrieval.

A few years ago when we installed the Vulcan it was quickly found that a long shank and 50 pounds of mud add to the anchor rising potential when retrieving. Live and learn - boating 101.
sunchaser is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2020, 10:26 AM   #14
Guru
 
rgano's Avatar
 
City: Southport, Florida
Country: USA
Vessel Name: FROLIC
Vessel Model: Mainship 30 Pilot II since 2015. GB-42 1986-2015. Former Unlimited Tonnage Master
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 2,161
Send a message via Skype™ to rgano
The exact sequence leading to your loss is still vague. Had you rested at anchor for a period of time with the anchor successfully holding you in place before you decided to weigh anchor? If so, how was the anchor chain secured on deck to hold you?
__________________
Rich Gano
FROLIC (2005 MainShip 30 Pilot II)
Panama City area
rgano is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2020, 11:19 AM   #15
Dauntless Award
 
Wxx3's Avatar
 
City: Wrangell, Alaska
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Dauntless
Vessel Model: Kadey Krogen 42 - 148
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 2,796
Quote:
Originally Posted by hollywood8118 View Post
Herb,
First of all welcome to the forum.
You will get some pretty scathing comments from the group here for the anchoring incident.. try to learn from all the comments and don't feel too bad for what happened... ALL OF US HERE have done something along those lines in our years of boating.
The big lesson learned here is about being prepared, knowing how much chain you have, having it secured on the bitter end, having it well marked, using it in shallow water first to practice etc.

60' you must of been out at Catalina?. You may get lucky to retrieve it if you had a really good position where it went over.. but it may be gone by the time you have someone there to get it. My suggestion is to purchase a new anchor setup, mark it all out prior to taking it and installing it aboard and connect it to the boat with 20' of rope that can be cut away in a emergency. Move past it and move forward.


HOLLYWOOD


And add a chain lock to your system. It will go between the windlass and the end of the bow pulpit. You do not want to have your chain tugging on the windlass while at anchor.

I'd probably get a grapnel hook and try to snag the chain sitting on the bottom.
__________________
Richard on Dauntless,
New York

a Kadey Krogen 42 currently: https://share.garmin.com/dauntless
Blog:
https://dauntlessatsea.com
Wxx3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2020, 02:06 PM   #16
Guru
 
Group9's Avatar
 
City: Bay Saint Louis, Mississippi, (or where the anchor drops)
Country: USA
Vessel Model: 1973 42 Bertram MY
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 1,069
I watched a Rocna 44 and 40 feet of chain that I thought was hooked to a line rode go off the roller on the Bahama Banks one night. My own Captain Ron moment. .
__________________
"It's the tides. They can work for you, and they can work against you. And, confidentially, I've had this problem with the tides before." Captain Ron
Group9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2020, 02:23 PM   #17
Guru
 
CaptTom's Avatar
 
City: Southern Maine
Country: USA
Vessel Model: Prairie 36 Coastal Cruiser
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 2,090
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wxx3 View Post
I'd probably get a grapnel hook and try to snag the chain sitting on the bottom.
This bears repeating. It shouldn't be too hard to snag an anchor and chain if you have any clue where it is.
CaptTom is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2020, 02:35 PM   #18
Guru
 
menzies's Avatar
 
City: Jacksonville
Country: USA
Vessel Name: SONAS
Vessel Model: Grand Alaskan 53
Join Date: May 2014
Posts: 6,629
Quote:
Originally Posted by Group9 View Post
I watched a Rocna 44 and 40 feet of chain that I thought was hooked to a line rode go off the roller on the Bahama Banks one night. My own Captain Ron moment. .
Should have been able to see it on the bottom next morning?
menzies is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2020, 04:51 PM   #19
Guru
 
Group9's Avatar
 
City: Bay Saint Louis, Mississippi, (or where the anchor drops)
Country: USA
Vessel Model: 1973 42 Bertram MY
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 1,069
Quote:
Originally Posted by menzies View Post
Should have been able to see it on the bottom next morning?
Yeah, I thought so, too. But, after motoring back and forth where I thought I dropped it without seeing it for about an hour, I realized I was wrong.
__________________
"It's the tides. They can work for you, and they can work against you. And, confidentially, I've had this problem with the tides before." Captain Ron
Group9 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-08-2020, 05:22 PM   #20
Guru
 
wkearney99's Avatar
 
City: Bethesda, MD
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Solstice
Vessel Model: Grand Banks 47 Eastbay FB
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 1,388
Quote:
Originally Posted by Herb Ault View Post
Dropped anchor in what my depth gauge told me it was 60 ft. Only the second time I've dropped anchor on the trawler that I have owned for a little over two years. No marking on the chain so I really have no idea how much was let out.
Decided to weigh in the anchor and the chain started slipping over the gypsy wheel and ran away. Lost it all. What did I do wrong?
First was not knowing how much chain was going out. Second was not having previously confirmed there was anything in the chain locker securing the chain to the boat. Third was (likely) not knowing what periodic maintenance is needed for your windlass.

And now you're here, and making the mistake of not telling us what kind of windlass you have installed. What's the make/model?

Many have some sort of clutch on them that can control the tension. If yours has that then it's likely it wasn't adjusted properly.

Meanwhile, 60' would indicate need for a 3:1 scope for a short-term anchoring. Did you have 180' aboard? (well, I guess you can't answer than now). If you planned on a longer say you'd want to use a 5:1 or greater scope.

It's not uncommon to have a combination of chain and rope for an anchor rode. As much chain as you can carry is always a good plan, as the weight of it will help keep the rode angle more parallel to the bottom, to help it keep a good bite, and to re-set when you move due to wind/current. But having a combination requires having a windlass designed to handle them.

So we circle back to the question, what brand and model windlass do you have on the boat now?
__________________

__________________
-- Bill Kearney
2005 Eastbay 47 FB - Solstice
wkearney99 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:18 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012
×