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Old 09-14-2020, 03:12 PM   #41
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Originally Posted by BonesD View Post
Reading this post letting the Anchor Free Fall is mentioned.
Why and under what circumstance would this be done?
Not all windlass motors are designed to operate in reverse - deploying the anchor - for an extended period of time. I think my manual says, "only (operate in reverse) for minor adjustments," whatever that means. It takes practice, but appropriate use of the clutch can control release of the chain so that it doesn't end up as a large pile beneath the bow when anchoring.

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Old 09-14-2020, 03:16 PM   #42
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I guess not everyone anchors often or pays a lot of attention to their ground tackle. I bought a used bought a used bought last year and removed and inspected what I had and upgraded as needed. I never would have thought to drop anchor without doing that first.
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Old 09-14-2020, 03:39 PM   #43
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Wonder if insurance would cover it?
Yes and No. It would depend on the deductible.

44Lb Rocna: $500
275 ft 5/15 HT Chain: $880.
Total: $1,380.00

If the deductible is $1,000, would it be worth it to submit a claim for $380 dollars??
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Old 09-15-2020, 06:59 AM   #44
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Dropped anchor in what my depth gauge told me it was 60 ft. Only the second time I've dropped anchor on the trawler that I have owned for a little over two years. No marking on the chain so I really have no idea how much was let out.
Decided to weigh in the anchor and the chain started slipping over the gypsy wheel and ran away. Lost it all. What did I do wrong?

Bought a boat.
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Old 09-15-2020, 07:47 AM   #45
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Originally Posted by GregBrannon View Post
Not all windlass motors are designed to operate in reverse - deploying the anchor - for an extended period of time. I think my manual says, "only (operate in reverse) for minor adjustments," whatever that means. It takes practice.

Greg.
I'm surprised, what model is it?
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Old 09-15-2020, 11:54 AM   #46
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I'm surprised, what model is it?
It's a Galley Maid vertical roughly as old as the boat. I read at Sam's that their original design included full capability for both forward and reverse, but they lost a challenge by a competitor that accused them of copying their design. The solution was to remove the full reverse capability. The motor is capable of running in reverse and the install often has the switches to run it in reverse, but it doesn't have the mechanical parts (reverse thrust bearing?) to enable it to endure continuous heavy reverse operation. A mod is possible to restore full reverse, but I haven't pursued it.

Free falling to deploy the anchor seems a common approach. My USN carrier did it that way. My boating mentors (sailors) recommended the free-fall approach even before I was aware the windlass was limited, because that's the way they'd always done it.

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Old 09-15-2020, 12:52 PM   #47
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I pulled out all my chain. I determined it was attached to the boat with a hasp (brain fart) I had to grind that loose, got about 30 feet of yellow poly, a couple thimbles too. So now if all 275ft of 5/16inch chain runs, it will slow down as it rips the poly line apart. LOL In an emergency, I can let the chain run and cut the poly line. In either case, the floating poly line will float making it easier to locate.

Somewhere on YouTube they is a video of a navy ship's anchor chain running and could not be stopped. They discovered, the chain was not secured to the ship. LOL That chain was running so fast, it was smoking. I suspect there was the chief of the deck crew, standing before the captain 'splaying what happened. They retrieved the chain and anchor within a couple of days.
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Old 09-15-2020, 01:15 PM   #48
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Somewhere on YouTube they is a video of a navy ship's anchor chain running and could not be stopped. They discovered, the chain was not secured to the ship. LOL That chain was running so fast, it was smoking. I suspect there was the chief of the deck crew, standing before the captain 'splaying what happened. They retrieved the chain and anchor within a couple of days.
I've seen a few of those clips. Do they even secure the chain in the ship? I'd wonder if it'd be a bigger problem having a run-away chain suddenly be SLAMMED to a halt. Seems like it'd tear a bulkhead loose with all that kinetic energy.
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Old 09-15-2020, 02:42 PM   #49
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Guess we chased him off.

One thing that I try to do as a habit is to mark a waypoint where the anchor hits bottom. Worse case I can return to the exact spot I dropped the anchor should the anchor be lost. It also lets me see if I'm dragging. I usually delete the waypoint when the anchor is back on the pulpit.
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Old 09-15-2020, 02:46 PM   #50
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High wire, great hint/habit to share. Newbie behavior is often unexplainable. We do our best to help them but we also help each other like your post just did!!
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Old 09-15-2020, 03:27 PM   #51
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I've seen a few of those clips. Do they even secure the chain in the ship? I'd wonder if it'd be a bigger problem having a run-away chain suddenly be SLAMMED to a halt. Seems like it'd tear a bulkhead loose with all that kinetic energy.
Best guess, you are correct. I doubt if large ships have facilities to lower the anchor in an order fashion.
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Old 09-15-2020, 05:02 PM   #52
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Guess we chased him off.

One thing that I try to do as a habit is to mark a waypoint where the anchor hits bottom. Worse case I can return to the exact spot I dropped the anchor should the anchor be lost. It also lets me see if I'm dragging. I usually delete the waypoint when the anchor is back on the pulpit.
I have a small-ish grapnel hook anchor, and a fairly strong 'fishing magnet'. I should probably take a stab at checking whether either one of them could actually assist in retrieving my chain.
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Old 09-15-2020, 05:10 PM   #53
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Originally Posted by motion30 View Post
First thing that was done wrong is the end of the chain was not secured to the boat
This one! I shackle a large ring to the end of the chain so this can't happen. I have a mixed rode so I can always cut the nylon anchor line if need be.
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Old 09-15-2020, 09:54 PM   #54
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Originally Posted by wkearney99 View Post
I've seen a few of those clips. Do they even secure the chain in the ship? I'd wonder if it'd be a bigger problem having a run-away chain suddenly be SLAMMED to a halt. Seems like it'd tear a bulkhead loose with all that kinetic energy.

I have the same question for a trawler.

On my Tollycraft, the PO has secured the bitter end to a ring mounted to the center of the marine plywood bulkhead at the back of the chain locker. If I have a runaway chain, I'm sure it will rip out. Might take a big enough chunk of wood that it gets hung up as it runs out the hawse pipe.

I'm starting to think a long section of floating line to mark the spot and let it fly might be the better option. Unless it slows down and causes no harm before it pulls on whatever it's secured to. Probably depends on the scenario as to what you wish you'd done before whatever you wish hadn't happened happened... (follow that?)

My secure point is probably a bulkhead hole waiting to happen.

Anyway, what are you all shackleing your rode to that you don't worry about yanking on?
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Old 09-16-2020, 05:38 AM   #55
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Sonas has a large ring embedded into the fiberglass at the bottom of the chain locker.
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Old 09-16-2020, 06:06 AM   #56
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Originally Posted by ORIF View Post
I have the same question for a trawler.

On my Tollycraft, the PO has secured the bitter end to a ring mounted to the center of the marine plywood bulkhead at the back of the chain locker. If I have a runaway chain, I'm sure it will rip out. Might take a big enough chunk of wood that it gets hung up as it runs out the hawse pipe.

I'm starting to think a long section of floating line to mark the spot and let it fly might be the better option. Unless it slows down and causes no harm before it pulls on whatever it's secured to. Probably depends on the scenario as to what you wish you'd done before whatever you wish hadn't happened happened... (follow that?)

My secure point is probably a bulkhead hole waiting to happen.

Anyway, what are you all shackleing your rode to that you don't worry about yanking on?
If you are going to use a floating line, you would want it to be at least as long as the deepest water you are likely to anchor in. For most of us, that might be something like 50 ft. If that's the case, you might as well secure it because by the time you reach the end, all or most of the chain will already be sitting on the bottom so the pull should not be great.
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Old 09-16-2020, 09:25 AM   #57
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Sonas has a large ring embedded into the fiberglass at the bottom of the chain locker.
For the unenlightened, can you describe the dimensions of the ring and the structural strength of the attachment point? Would hate to see someone drill a hole in 1/4" marine plywood and attach 300lb of anchor and chain to it on their 27' Bayliner.
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Old 09-16-2020, 09:32 AM   #58
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Libra has a little different set up than a typical modern frp boat in terms of windlass and securing the chain. My main concern has been how to cut loose of the anchor and chain should the need arise. I have a large set of bolt cutters handy to the foredeck but currently no way to mark the abandoned ground tackle should it be cut loose. I should add a store of line and float for this.

The first pic is of the windlass which is free fall down controlled by the clutch brake with the T handle, then power up by the two speed gear coupled to a 380 volt electric motor by two belts.
The second pic shows how the chain is secured to the boat at the bitter end. It is shackled to a large link that is welded to the steel bulkhead on the port side and to the heavy steel hawse pipe on the starboard side. With max anchor depth of around 80 feet, this will need to restrain that length of 1/2 chain which will weigh around 200# moving at a controlled speed. I see no reasonable way for the manual brake to fail.
The two speed manual retrieve backup on this windlass gives me some comfort.
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Boy Boat Deck Gear.jpg   Libra chain locker.jpg  
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