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Old 10-28-2018, 02:27 PM   #21
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There is a 48 Hatteras MY for sale in Portsmouth, VA. You can see some info and pics on or thru samsmarine.com. 1981 completely refurbished interior and exterior. 6-92 DD engines, it will sleep 6 with 3 heads. Bad news, about 2x your indicated budget. There will be comments about the engines, and probably the anchor, but this is a glass boat built about as strong as a steel boat. Lots of possible concerns, is it still a 32 volt system should be one. Still might be worth a look.
I have no interest or affiliation with the owner, don't even know who he is, just happened to stumble across the boat.
bill
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Old 10-28-2018, 03:56 PM   #22
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Greeting. New to the forum and looking for advice on my first Trawler purchase. There are a lot of really nice boats for sale and I wanted some perspectives on whether to look at fiberglass or steel hulls. I donít know anything about steel hulls and currently I have a 34 ft Wellcraft 3200 Martinique. Also looking at having a twin diesels with 2 staterooms at least 40ft long. Looking at purchasing possibly next summer and my budget would be $60,000 or less. I am not afraid of an older boat and I also do like the classiness of older boats in general. The Hatteras, ChrisCraft, Grand Banks and older Trawlers I think are some of the nicest boats out there. Also, can I get roominess from a Trawler less than 40ft in length. Donít want to be crowded with 4-6 adults if cruising the Great Lakes.

Any comments are much appreciated.

Jim

Hello Jim,
Given that your goals may be very hard to attain which ones of these are you most likely willing to compromise on? Which are most important?
- Twin diesel
- twin stateroom
- not crowded sleeping 4/6 adults
- at least 40'
- less than $60K
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Old 10-28-2018, 04:05 PM   #23
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Jimmy V
There is a 48 Hatteras MY for sale in Portsmouth, VA. You can see some info and pics on or thru samsmarine.com. 1981 completely refurbished interior and exterior. 6-92 DD engines, it will sleep 6 with 3 heads. Bad news, about 2x your indicated budget. There will be comments about the engines, and probably the anchor, but this is a glass boat built about as strong as a steel boat. Lots of possible concerns, is it still a 32 volt system should be one. Still might be worth a look.
I have no interest or affiliation with the owner, don't even know who he is, just happened to stumble across the boat.
bill
32v should not be a deal breaker if you like the boat. Nearly everything is still available in 32v and 24v items can be used instead for those that aren’t. For instance 32v starters haven’t been available for years, but I and many others have been starting our engines for years with 24v starters. Ditto for the wall fans in the staterooms. Most 32v bulbs can be replaced with 12 to 80 volt LEDs and the rest are available online albeit at a price. 32v pumps are available and no more expensive than 24v. Etc.

BTW, here’s a 41’ double cabin, it looks pretty good, and has non-turbo motors, but it’s priced $20k under your budget so you may not be interested.

http://www.bayport.biz/boat/1966/hat...or-yacht/1568/
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Old 10-28-2018, 04:30 PM   #24
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Guys I just jumped on the computer and have read through all the posts and want to thank all of you. I see in most comments I will need to rethink the type of boat and will have to most likely increase my budget. I was talking with the wife and we are going to up our budget to $100,000 but hopefully will be less than that. Also, I want to thank the guys that mentioned boating on the Great Lakes. Rufus thank you for reminding me of the chop and quick changes on the Lake Michigan. I realize that having my Wellcraft and being able to get up and do 30-40 knots and get off the water quick is handy. Comodave thanks for insight in looking at the boat condition itself. I thought about looking at Carver, SeaRay and some others but have heard different points of view from many. I realize that opinions are like, well you know, but that being said I was told Carver is nice interior but doesn't perform well during rough water. I know that a lot depends on the hull design and also the skipper. I have been in 6-8 foot waves and have to say that the Wellcraft handles really nice compared to the Sea Ray I had before. As some of the replies have said I need to look at the boat condition and then the other qualities I want. Hopefully I will find a good mix to get what we want.

Again, thanks to all for your knowledge and recommendations, we really appreciate it.

JV
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Old 10-28-2018, 04:50 PM   #25
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Now that I have a direction on the type of boat. What opinions are there on whether to look at diesel or gas for a boat longer than 40ft. I have read different opinions and I know that fuel economy will be worse with gas however, if I keep the rpm down when not needed it may not be as bad.

Thanks JV
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Old 10-28-2018, 04:56 PM   #26
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What a nice response to the various posts. I wager that you will come very close to what works for you. Don't forget the St Louis, Ohio R, and Kentucky Lakes areas. Lots of older but under cover fresh water vessels in those locations.

As a suggestion, within reason ignore costs. Look at several boats that otherwise fit your desires as best can be done. Then you'll have a base point for what you'd really like. Then walk the docks looking for similar "for sale" vessels. A low price offer on an out of reach vessel may well work.
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Old 10-28-2018, 06:49 PM   #27
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Now that I have a direction on the type of boat. What opinions are there on whether to look at diesel or gas for a boat longer than 40ft. I have read different opinions and I know that fuel economy will be worse with gas however, if I keep the rpm down when not needed it may not be as bad.

Thanks JV


Over 40 feet? Diesel.
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Old 10-28-2018, 07:37 PM   #28
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Over 40 feet? Diesel.
Of course, which is why gas might make sense. Stay with me here...

Much less maintenance, could even replace engines for a fraction of diesel, quieter, smoother...huge discount on purchase and a PITA to sell but if youíre on a strict budget and can keep the miles within reason it might work.
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Old 10-28-2018, 08:22 PM   #29
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Greetings,
Mr. r. While I am also in the above 40'=diesel group you raise a very valid point.



Along with cheaper total engine replacement cost, parts and service for a gasser may be cheaper and more readily and widely available. I am completely in the dark about marinas/services in the great lakes but I assume one would be much more likely to find a mechanic with knowledge of, say a GM 454 than one with knowledge of a Lehman 120 (for example).



HAH! If Mr. JV isn't confused yet, he soon might be...
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Old 10-28-2018, 08:29 PM   #30
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Of course, which is why gas might make sense. Stay with me here...

Much less maintenance, could even replace engines for a fraction of diesel, quieter, smoother...huge discount on purchase and a PITA to sell but if youíre on a strict budget and can keep the miles within reason it might work.


I appreciate this angle. Clever. Iím going to try to find a 40+ footer with gas, online, just for fun. Iím sure there will be plenty of Crusader 350ís in 30-36 footers, and also some big blocks. Hmmm, letís see..
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Old 10-28-2018, 08:40 PM   #31
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Well Iíll be damned. There are a few gassers that fit the bill, in Chicago, in Michigan, in Tennessee, etc. I guess Iím more used to ocean boats where gas would be very odd...
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Old 10-28-2018, 08:48 PM   #32
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Just for scope the 62’ CC Motor Yacht had gas power.
Three 160hp flathead 6 cylinder gas engines.
Much bigger than most 6cyl car engines.
Early 50’s.
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Old 10-28-2018, 09:04 PM   #33
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Well I’ll be damned. There are a few gassers that fit the bill, in Chicago, in Michigan, in Tennessee, etc. I guess I’m more used to ocean boats where gas would be very odd...
Yup. I've been wandering around in boatyards in Chicago for the last few weeks. Amazing what you can find. I saw a 46 foot aluminum Chris Craft - 1960ish - sitting in covered storage that looked dusty but pretty pristine. Gassers. Might be a great 50k boat for the right person. There are lots of these sorts of boats around, many not actively for sale but open to offers.
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Old 10-28-2018, 09:28 PM   #34
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Guys don’t take this wrong but the last posts have me chuckling pretty good.

RTF I’m not confused but amused. I have enjoyed the comments on all the posts.

There are some decent Marina’s around the Great Lakes. I know three right here in Green Bay that do great work. Not sure about working on Lehman engines though RTF

I did find a couple boats at Skipper Buds in Sturgeon Bay WI for just under $70,000. We will be going up tomorrow to take a look at them.

Thanks again guys for the help.

Jim
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Old 10-28-2018, 11:19 PM   #35
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In Ludington MI there is a Trojan 44 for sale. It has very desirable diesels, DD 671Ns. $55K. I've been on the 44s, very nice vessels. If taken care of correctly this could be worth visiting.
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Old 10-29-2018, 07:48 AM   #36
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I guess the biggest thing for me was fuel economy. My Wellcraft has Volvo 7.4 GI and cruising at 18 knots burns about 40gph. I know I could cruise slower but not being on plane the ride isnít great. Itís nice to cruise faster but wish I could go at least 10-15 knots with decent fuel economy.

Thanks Jim
If this continues to be a goal of yours and you intend to cruise any decent distances (40+ foot boats) I would stay with diesels. We have cruised many 100+ mile legs with gas powered boats in our cruising group and between the fuel usage, fuel costs, range and actual attainable cruising speed I think you will be better off with diesel.
On the other hand if you are not going larger distances, not going past say 7 knots 90% of the time and do not require max range then gas may be a viable option.
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Old 10-29-2018, 08:54 AM   #37
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With the money you're looking to spend, you could get a pretty decent decommissioned fishing or patrol vessel. This approach has some serious benefits:

- You get all the space in the world. Sectioning off and furnishing a hold with stuff from Ikea is much cheaper than dealing with bespoke interiors.
- You get a whole new level of sea keeping ability, and that nasty 3 foot chop is reduced to a mere annoyance. A properly ballasted North Sea trawler can be damn near indestructible.
- You extend your economical speed range, sometimes beyond 10 knots.
- You get all kind of serious equipment thrown into the bargain, like multi stage fuel clarification, redundant power generation and heavy-duty lifting gear.


On the flip side, there are some inconveniences:
- Upkeep is an order of magnitude more expensive.
- Slow speed fuel burn may be a lot higher than for smaller boats, especially with vessels optimized for dwt vs loa. OTOH, older patrol vessels can be surprisingly cheap to run at 8 kts.
- Large boats can be intimidating at first (though it passes quickly)
- You run the risk of being That Guy.
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Old 10-29-2018, 12:18 PM   #38
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Gas in big boats would be a horrendous fuel bill if you travel much. Gasoline is even worse than new diesel for stability.
I have always had big boats, current is 83'. Going back to 1961. You dock with more care and planning, but otherwise a lot more comfortable. Especially in the ocean. And the longer hull gives a better hull speed and can be faster and cheaper on fuel than a shorter boat. My boat with twin DD 671s cruises easily at 10 knots using about 8.5 gallons. Almost half the fuel at 7 knots.
Depending on how old you are, your abilities, and what you need in resale, there are many boats within your budget. If you're old, not worried about resale, a boat needing some work that will last through your retirement safely, may be the answer.
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Old 10-29-2018, 12:34 PM   #39
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Lepke,
Length is golden indeed.
My short boat is limited to 6.25 knots.

How do you afford moorage for these big boats?
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Old 10-29-2018, 09:19 PM   #40
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Sunchaser

Thanks I will take a look at that boat.

Smitty

Thanks for the thought on longer trips. I do plan on traveling the Great Lakes more in the near future.

Henning

Thanks that would be a good idea, but I think the upkeep would be way too much for me.

Lepke

I wish I could afford an 83ftr. I did look at a couple of 55ft boats but for now it would be too big. I am not afraid to drive the boat but I would rather live permanently on a boat that size.

Thanks guys

Jim
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