Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 01-24-2021, 03:29 PM   #1
Veteran Member
 
City: NE Florida
Join Date: Dec 2020
Posts: 87
what makes a trawler suitable for ocean crossings?

I've seen/read several references that lead me to believe that many (most?) trawlers are considered to be better coastal short-ish range cruisers and not suitable for crossing oceans.

Rather than ask for a list of examples of boats that could be considered ocean crossers....I think it might be better to ask which features would point to a boat being suitable...or not.
Is it purely just the size of the fuel tank?

As a point of reference, I'm just a dreamer....and I'm thinking primarily coastal cruising east coast of US, probably the Bahamas/Caribbean.... maybe a bit of the great lakes sort of thing, I don't know.....but at some point we'd love the idea of crossing over to Europe and spending lots of time there....and eventually back.... I'm not taking about regular frequent crossings or fast paced circumnavigating.....

I'm still at the stage of just wondering...sailing vessels vs motoring, what sorts of things might we end up wanting to do...but as I dream and imagine I'd like to keep in mind the things we would need in terms of something capable of crossing to Europe.
__________________
Advertisement

skyhawk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2021, 03:36 PM   #2
Veteran Member
 
MERIDIAN 2's Avatar
 
City: FORT LAUDERDALE,FL
Vessel Name: MERIDIAN^2 (squared)
Vessel Model: 1984 Pilgrim 40
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 62
Tankage is a big part of the equation, add to that displacement (the heavier the boat is, the more "sea kindly" it will be. Also a high foredeck doesn't hurt either.
__________________

MERIDIAN 2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2021, 04:01 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
fgarriso's Avatar
 
City: Desoto
Vessel Name: GOTCHA
Vessel Model: DeFever 59-B PH
Join Date: Jun 2019
Posts: 388
Storm shields!!
Very high bow and freeboard.
More fuel tankage than you need by 25%.
SSB radio.
Enough crew to stand watch 24/7 for several days.
Some method of stabilize the boat in high seas.
Lots of spares and tools.
2 times the stores you think you need. ( food and water )
Make sure every crew man/woman has run 48 hours min. far offshore.
Emergency life raft with survival kit.
__________________
Captain F. Lee - R.P.E.
USCG 200 ton Master
fgarriso is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2021, 04:10 PM   #4
Newbie
 
City: Gig Harbor
Join Date: Dec 2020
Posts: 1
You can always put the boat on a freighter to get her across. Depending on what you'd need to do to upgrade your boat and yourself for the crossing it could be cheaper or not much more money. That takes away some of the romance and adventure of it for sure though.
Slice is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2021, 04:31 PM   #5
Guru
 
OldDan1943's Avatar
 
City: Aventura FL
Vessel Name: Kinja
Vessel Model: American Tug 34 #116
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 7,077
Quote:
Originally Posted by fgarriso View Post
Storm shields!!
Very high bow and freeboard.
More fuel tankage than you need by 25%.
SSB radio.
Enough crew to stand watch 24/7 for several days.
Some method of stabilize the boat in high seas.
Lots of spares and tools.
2 times the stores you think you need. ( food and water )
Make sure every crew man/woman has run 48 hours min. far offshore.
Emergency life raft with survival kit.
Engine room air intake high on the boat to prevent water intrusion.
Backup steering gear/rebuild
__________________
The meek will inherit the earth but, the brave will inherit the seas.
OldDan1943 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2021, 05:20 PM   #6
Guru
 
MYTraveler's Avatar
 
City: West Coast
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 1,346
Stability in heavy seas is critically important. All boats are self righting at least up to some limit. After that limit, the boat will roll with disastrous consequences. That limit, called the angle of vanishing stability (or AVS) varies widely based on design factors. Since the risk of getting caught in high seas is greater when crossing an ocean than when making a coastal hop, a high AVS is much more important if crossing an ocean.

The ability to shed water quickly is also important. During a particularly heavy storm years (and a prior boat -- typical battlewagon sportfisher) ago, following seas repeated broke into the cockpit and filled it 2 feet deep with water. We had the tuna doors open just to allow the water to pour out quickly and (thanks to the self-bailing design) without a drop ending up in the bilge.
MYTraveler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2021, 05:28 PM   #7
Guru
 
caltexflanc's Avatar
 
City: North Carolina for now
Vessel Name: Small Incentive
Vessel Model: Boston Whaler 130 Sport
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 6,435
A great read is Beebe's "Voyaging Under Power". It is about this very question and answers virtually all of them.. The more recent editions are Nordhavn edited, but still very good.
__________________
George

"There's the Right Way, the Wrong Way, and what some guy says he's gotten away with"
caltexflanc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2021, 06:03 PM   #8
Veteran Member
 
City: NE Florida
Join Date: Dec 2020
Posts: 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by fgarriso View Post
More fuel tankage than you need by 25%.
well I guess that's a question..... what's the typical planning distance between fueling stops to get to/from Europe from the US?
skyhawk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2021, 06:12 PM   #9
Guru
 
cardude01's Avatar
 
City: Victoria TX
Vessel Name: Bijou
Vessel Model: 2008 Island Packet PY/SP
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 4,859
Quote:
Originally Posted by MYTraveler View Post
Stability in heavy seas is critically important. All boats are self righting at least up to some limit. After that limit, the boat will roll with disastrous consequences. That limit, called the angle of vanishing stability (or AVS) varies widely based on design factors. Since the risk of getting caught in high seas is greater when crossing an ocean than when making a coastal hop, a high AVS is much more important if crossing an ocean.

The ability to shed water quickly is also important. During a particularly heavy storm years (and a prior boat -- typical battlewagon sportfisher) ago, following seas repeated broke into the cockpit and filled it 2 feet deep with water. We had the tuna doors open just to allow the water to pour out quickly and (thanks to the self-bailing design) without a drop ending up in the bilge.

This is a great point, and why George Buehler designed his Diesel Ducks with open decks like a sailboat IIRC.

My boat has a cockpit with small drains and I always worry about it getting pooped if in a big breaking following sea. It also has a small door out to the swim platform so maybe if caught in that situation I should just leave the door open?
cardude01 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2021, 06:15 PM   #10
Guru
 
Lou_tribal's Avatar
 
City: Quebec
Vessel Name: Bleuvet
Vessel Model: Custom Built
Join Date: Jan 2016
Posts: 4,176
I would say that the best person to answer your question based on experience and not on imagination is Richard.
Hopefully he will chime in.

L
Lou_tribal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2021, 06:20 PM   #11
Senior Member
 
fgarriso's Avatar
 
City: Desoto
Vessel Name: GOTCHA
Vessel Model: DeFever 59-B PH
Join Date: Jun 2019
Posts: 388
Quote:
Originally Posted by skyhawk View Post
well I guess that's a question..... what's the typical planning distance between fueling stops to get to/from Europe from the US?
2900 NM

You may stop over at Bermuda and/or Azores for fuel stops, but plan on being able to go the full stretch if need be.
__________________
Captain F. Lee - R.P.E.
USCG 200 ton Master
fgarriso is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2021, 06:47 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
DCDC's Avatar
 
City: New Orleans
Vessel Name: Stella
Vessel Model: Seaton 56
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 181
Quote:
Originally Posted by skyhawk View Post
well I guess that's a question..... what's the typical planning distance between fueling stops to get to/from Europe from the US?
Written for sail but most of the criteria for route planning are similar to power boats: efficient routes with respect to seasonal weather patterns, trade winds, currents, departure points and destinations.
Attached Thumbnails
502B9C9A-E8F2-418E-8B5D-252A7FCF3F5E.jpg  
DCDC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2021, 07:06 PM   #13
Guru
 
Benthic2's Avatar
 
City: Boston Area
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 1,776
A helipad generally makes a boat suitable for ocean crossing.
Benthic2 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2021, 07:15 PM   #14
Veteran Member
 
City: NE Florida
Join Date: Dec 2020
Posts: 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Benthic2 View Post
A helipad generally makes a boat suitable for ocean crossing.
I'm a private pilot who's always wished I could afford to fly helicopters, that's an idea I can appreciate.
skyhawk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2021, 07:16 PM   #15
Guru
 
OldDan1943's Avatar
 
City: Aventura FL
Vessel Name: Kinja
Vessel Model: American Tug 34 #116
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 7,077
Leaving the stern gate open is something I would do if necessary except in following seas.
I have seen videos of sports fishermen back down, stern gate closed and still the water all but flooded the cockpit.
Back to common sense.
__________________
The meek will inherit the earth but, the brave will inherit the seas.
OldDan1943 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2021, 07:27 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
City: San Diego, CA
Vessel Name: Freedom
Vessel Model: Hatteras 48 LRC
Join Date: Jan 2019
Posts: 196
I concur with new member "Slice". Unless one is contemplating a need or desire to frequentlymake ocean crossings and/or has a very large budget for a large boat suitable to the task it will almost certainly be a better option to ship the boat and only purchase the boat you need for your primary cruising purposes.

In addition to the economic consideration if you factor in safety and value of your time shipping can be very attractive. Thousands of miles on open ocean is going to cost a lot of money, cause a lot of wear and tear and also put one at high risk of hitting unfavorable weather.

20 years ago I had a captain deliver my Hatteras 58 from San Diego to Florida and I wish I had just shipped it. If I were today wanting to get my Hatteras 48LRC to Florida there is no doubt I would ship it. Shipping cost is about $30K which is not cheap but if you really factor in all the costs of going on it's own bottom I don't think it is that much more expensive.

As pointed out perhaps if you are looking for adventure and have months to make the trip then maybe if you are an experienced captain with a VERY seaworthy boat you might want to take it yourself. But this is NOT close to the task of crossing an ocean, that is just a whole other league.
READY is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2021, 07:41 PM   #17
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: penultimate Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 12,167
Shipped my boat from China to California on a ship. Didn't have the crew, knowledge for navigating in the open sea nor the mechanical knowledge, sufficient familiarity with the boat, nor the desire to bounce across the wide Pacific Ocean or the confidence that a 35-foot boat was up to it; also the boat didn't have the range.
__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2021, 08:13 PM   #18
Guru
 
Portage_Bay's Avatar
 
City: Coupeville Wa.
Vessel Name: Pelorus
Vessel Model: Californian 42 LRC
Join Date: Oct 2015
Posts: 1,165
A lot of good points in this thread. I'll add my wish list. All deck hatches should be watertight. Doors at deck level at least heavy duty weather tight if not water tight. I've too often been in boarding seas with water 2 to 3 ft deep on deck. That was coastal transits. Water tight bulkheads below the main deck in order to better control flooding. Major dewatering capability. Serious fire suppression.

I know many if not most recreational boats making blue water passages are not set up that way. But it's what I'd want to feel safe.
__________________
CRS. Can't remember sh!t. My dad uses to say that. As I stare 70 in the face... Oh, what were we talking about?
Portage_Bay is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2021, 08:17 PM   #19
Guru
 
MYTraveler's Avatar
 
City: West Coast
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 1,346
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldDan1943 View Post
Leaving the stern gate open is something I would do if necessary except in following seas.
The transom doors, if closed, will keep seas out, unless they are big enough to get in anyway, in which case the closed doors will trap a lot of water in the cockpit. IME, once the seas are breaking into the cockpit, its time to keep the doors open to drain the cockpit.
MYTraveler is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-24-2021, 08:31 PM   #20
Guru
 
O C Diver's Avatar
 
City: Fort Myers, FL... Summers in Crisfield, MD
Vessel Name: Slow Hand
Vessel Model: Cherubini Independence 45
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 10,098
Fuel capacity
Water maker
Food storage capacity
Satellite communications
Redundant propulsion systems (twin engines for me)
Water shedding capacity
High bow
Redundant steering system and autopilot
Redundant electronics
Crew of 3 minimum

Ted
__________________

__________________
Blog: mvslowhand.com
I'm tired of fast moves, I've got a slow groove, on my mind.....
I want to spend some time, Not come and go in a heated rush.....
"Slow Hand" by The Pointer Sisters
O C Diver is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



» Trawler Port Captains
Port Captains are TF volunteers who can serve as local guides or assist with local arrangements and information. Search below to locate Port Captains near your destination. To learn more about this program read here: TF Port Captain Program





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:18 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012
×