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Old 12-25-2017, 04:40 PM   #41
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Find the Goldilocks spot in between. Take pride in your work, but be realistic, and you'll be fine.
I think I fall in that category. Right now I'm just soaking up all I can.
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Old 12-25-2017, 04:52 PM   #42
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The work is different, but not unusual. There's a lot to soak up but the info is out there. If you're the type who wants to do it yourself and spends the time doing the research, you'll get it done.

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Old 12-25-2017, 04:57 PM   #43
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The work is different, but not unusual. There's a lot to soak up but the info is out there. If you're the type who wants to do it yourself and spends the time doing the research, you'll get it done.

Ken
I'm a firm believer in learning from other people's mistakes. With the internet and a willingness to spend time researching, I feel I can make it happen. Thanks.
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Old 12-25-2017, 05:20 PM   #44
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WeGoLook.com, anyone have comments

I dunno yall... I think it is worth $100 to have someone just run and take a look to see if the pictures on YachtWold even remotely represent the reality. When we were shopping, there were a few boats in FL we were interested in where it would have been worth something for me to have a remote set of eyeballs to take a look. Of course, they would have to be current boat owners and give me somewhat of a thorough report. Then if you see something, that would be the time to call a broker. I didnít look at the site. Do these lookers just looks from the dock or get permission to actually board?
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Old 12-25-2017, 06:05 PM   #45
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oakbuilder,

A boat broker will help you find a boat or sell your boat. Then deal with the sale paperwork. That's about it.

Hire a captain to walk you through every step of the buying process. A captain will be your representative and your counselor. They will be able to tell you how the different hulls handle and which kind will be most appropriate for your needs. Most captains are (at the very least) knowledgable enough to give the hull and systems a good look. The captain can hire the surveyor and check their report. Also, use the captain to help you choose the electronics. An older boat will probably need at least some of the electronics updated. If you have work done to the boat the captain can interface with the boatyard. He/she will make sure the work was done and done properly.

When you finally get the boat of your dreams the captain will teach you how to use it and especially dock it. My captain worked with me all day in the harbor repeatedly docking the boat until I had it down.

Maybe not all captains will do much more than boat delivery but there are captains that will do all of the above.

I think a captain's job is pretty cool and I have a lot of respect for them, (real licensed captains) not skippers (like me).

Cheers!
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Old 12-25-2017, 06:20 PM   #46
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oakbuilder,

...Hire a captain to walk you through every step of the buying process...
Cheers!
That sounds good. Where can one find Captains willing to hire out for such a job? I assume this forum would be one such place. Thanks.
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Old 12-25-2017, 06:54 PM   #47
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That sounds good. Where can one find Captains willing to hire out for such a job? I assume this forum would be one such place. Thanks.
After I looked at a couple of boats I found one that I thought I might be truly interested in buying. I paid a fairly well known Captain and trawler trainer to come and run through the boat with me. See what he thought. It cost me $500 for the day but I learned more in that one day than I could have in a month of reading. Inspecting decks, plumbing, engines, electrical, raw water cooling system, water pumps, impellers, bonding, on and on. It was nothing short of amazing how he just looked at things and could tell what was good and what was bad. The boat I thought I was interested in buying wasn't even close to a good buy and he helped me learn what I should be looking for. Actually the best thing was that the boat was in TERRIBLE shape. Lots to learn about on that one. Without a doubt the best money I spent during the purchase process.

My background is somewhat similar to yours. A lot of self teaching and hard earned experience both on land and on the water. I quickly learned that a marine electrical system is not like the one in my home. Making mistakes on grounds and neutrals and bonding in a boat will help it get eaten alive. Marine plumbing is NOT like it is in a home. Lack of a vented loop in the right place can sink the boat. That fresh water connection on deck that lets me use water from the marina rather than from my tanks when I'm in the slip can sink it as well if left on and unattended. Just a couple of examples of things I didn't know I didn't know. I paid a total of about $1,500 in "education" days with this Captain. One of them was helping me on the delivery. Education isn't real cheap but the lack of education would have cost me a lot more. Just my $.02 as they say! Good luck!
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Old 12-25-2017, 07:12 PM   #48
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Boats are cheap to buy, but

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I know I am coming off as very naive, but I really don't think so. Of course it will be a project boat. I don't have all the knowledge and experience but ya know what, I have built a house from the ground up, by myself. I cut trees off my property and sawed them into lumber on my bandsaw mill. I did all plumbing and electrical too and I learned as I went. I drove a tractor trailer all over the country, but hey, before I started driving, I had to learn, and learn I did, with zero accidents in well over one million miles. I worked as a self-employed handyman for over 10 years, and did many many jobs doing things I had never done before, but I educated myself and got it done. Until I am dead, I will never stop learning. If it takes a year to head out, fine. I have found many boats in my price range that I want to look at, I just cant hit the road yet. If I can't insure it, oh well, I will only go to marinas to fuel, pumpout, etc. I am way past letting others tell me what I can and can not do. If I am about to crash and burn, please tell me, but at this point, I believe I can navigate around the obstacles and go for our dream.
Expensive to maintain. Buying boats is easy, and you probably can learn all you need to make repairs, but, rehabbing a boat is expensive in both time and money. If you spend $25k buying a boat, you could easily spend two to three times that making it reliable and safe. I. The end, you will still have a $25k boat.

Be careful can not be said too many times.
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Old 12-25-2017, 07:44 PM   #49
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That sounds good. Where can one find Captains willing to hire out for such a job? I assume this forum would be one such place. Thanks.
Word of mouth is the best way. First thing, go online and look up "ship captain requirements" and educate yourself about what a captain is before you start interviewing them. I have had some luck looking for captains online but when you start dealing with brokers and other people in the boating industry everyone knows at least two captains. The captain that i'm using I found through a fellow that is working on my boat. The gentleman that I bought the boat from said that he could refer me to a few. Call any marina and ask if they know of any captains. Those little buggers seem to be all over the place when you start asking people in the boating industry.
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Old 12-25-2017, 07:58 PM   #50
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oakbuilder,

What is your budget?
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Old 12-25-2017, 08:17 PM   #51
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Be nice to have someone, not necessarily a surveyor, but someone with boat knowledge, give a preliminary assessment. I've just started looking and I live in south central UT, not exactly a boating Mecca. I see boats on both coasts that could fit the bill, but I don't want to spend a fortune on airfare trying to find a boat. Luckily my brother in law lives in SD, so I'll start there.
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Old 12-25-2017, 09:33 PM   #52
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Be nice to have someone, not necessarily a surveyor, but someone with boat knowledge, give a preliminary assessment. I've just started looking and I live in south central UT, not exactly a boating Mecca. I see boats on both coasts that could fit the bill, but I don't want to spend a fortune on airfare trying to find a boat. Luckily my brother in law lives in SD, so I'll start there.
Finding a sizable boat can be difficult even if you live on one of the coasts. I live in the San Francisco bay area. I wanted a trawler but there aren't a lot of trawlers for sale in this area for some reason. There are a lot of Grand Banks but very few Defevers, Selenes, Nordhavns and many others that I didn't even know existed. The internet is the only way to start the search. Then you might find something you like in another state. Then you have to fly out to look at it. Or (in my case) I liked the North Pacific and had to drive down to San Diego to look at one that was not for sale. I was going to buy a new one and had to wait several months while it was being built. It's not an easy process whether you're buying new or used.

Good Luck,
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Old 12-26-2017, 09:20 PM   #53
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Most surveyors will attend boat look at most important stuff and call by noon with the major issues ....u chose to complete or not ...if u pass its half fee.you make the call.
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Old 12-27-2017, 06:57 AM   #54
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30 ft is a good size and easy to live aboard.

A boat is wider and than a travel trailer and boat builders have 5000 years of practice in packing a quart into a pint pot.

The one skill that is probably missing from your skill set is GRP repair.

With luck you can avoid this buy careful observation before purchase.

GRP is almost always strong enough , but it is difficult to have it stiff enough , without engineering and costs.

Cracked gel coat is a sign of structural (too much flex) problem that can frequently be difficult to repair .

Look for a vessel that is the 3rd or 4th version of a production boat , most of the structural and interior hassles will have been already re engineered by the factory.

Good hunting.
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Old 12-27-2017, 08:34 PM   #55
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We agree about a buyer's broker, but beware, they are not created equal.

We fired one that was supposedly the cream of the crop - but after a lengthy educational phone call that narrowed in on what we were looking for, for the next three months, he ONLY recommended listings that he was also the selling broker. This was a nationally highly reputable brokerage. We were very disappointed.

We then switched to a different broker that we'd interviewed via phone previous to selecting the wrong choice. He worked hard and found us the perfect boat. So don't be afraid to fire someone if it's not working out to your satisfaction.

It's especially frustrating if you don't live close to a coast - we were in Illinois - looked at boats in Wisconsin, Alabama and finally Florida.

Good luck & enjoy the journey!
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Old 12-27-2017, 10:01 PM   #56
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We agree about a buyer's broker, but beware, they are not created equal.

We fired one that was supposedly the cream of the crop - but after a lengthy educational phone call that narrowed in on what we were looking for, for the next three months, he ONLY recommended listings that he was also the selling broker. This was a nationally highly reputable brokerage. We were very disappointed.

We then switched to a different broker that we'd interviewed via phone previous to selecting the wrong choice. He worked hard and found us the perfect boat. So don't be afraid to fire someone if it's not working out to your satisfaction.

It's especially frustrating if you don't live close to a coast - we were in Illinois - looked at boats in Wisconsin, Alabama and finally Florida.

Good luck & enjoy the journey!
Couldn't agree more.
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