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Old 04-19-2017, 01:04 PM   #21
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I commonly see them used interchangeably. Sometimes Tuna Door on a fishing boat and Transom Door in a cruising boat. I was once told that the traditional Tuna Door does not open at the gunwale and only opens with the gunwale completely connected.

Thanks.
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Old 04-19-2017, 01:05 PM   #22
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On some boats, the transom provides structural rigidity to the hull. You may want to confirm that your transom door won't impair that rigidity.
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Old 04-19-2017, 02:39 PM   #23
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Hi, Janice. Pardon the off topic post but I know exactly where those photos of Seaweed were taken! The ICW from St. Petersburg to Tarpon Springs is my cruising grounds. I definitely see the convenience of a tuna door on your boat. I look forward to seeing the final product.
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Old 04-19-2017, 03:44 PM   #24
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Greetings,
I agree that a properly engineered door that opens outward would not be forced open if slammed by a big wave BUT Ms. J shouldn't be out in conditions that would allow that to occur. So, my vote would be inward opening with two sturdy latches
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Old 04-19-2017, 07:09 PM   #25
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Our transom was already cut out and there was a makeshift door in the opening so I didn't have the cut out from the transom . The door I made is in two pieces with the caprail section that hinges on top of the caprail and straddles the door that opens to the inside . It's a funky design but it's all I could come up with . The door center panel is a piece of 1/2 " starboard.
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Old 04-20-2017, 10:29 AM   #26
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This below, think about the large opening, if you are just bay cruising shouldn't be an issue, but in the ocean a lot of flexing goes on and cracks will form without proper reinforcement of the opening.
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On some boats, the transom provides structural rigidity to the hull. You may want to confirm that your transom door won't impair that rigidity.
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Old 04-20-2017, 11:37 AM   #27
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A transom door that opens outward will likely function as a huge scupper if you take a breaking wave into the cockpit. I would expect many latching mechanisms to fail under such load which would be of great benefit.
Not of any interest for her purposes, just a comment.
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Old 04-20-2017, 12:24 PM   #28
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My old boat, SeaHorse II, had a Tuna door that opened out and I almost fell over board several times.(The latch didn't work properly and the door would swing open when underway) My preent boat's Tuna door opens in and it's much safer.
Falling out is a concern. Thanks.

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Opening out and hooking in the open position saves space.

Do you significantly weaken the back of your boat by cutting a piece out of the transom? Did your mfg ever offer this option? There are doubtless ways to stiffen the opening. Probably been done before - don't reinvent the wheel.
The hull strength is a concern. A friend has cut a full size tuna door in the back of his 40' Schucker. He mentioned reinforcing and that it was a relatively easy project.

That man is skilled though!
His opening is wider and taller than mine will be.

There was no tuna door option in any of the Schuckers though many now have them.

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Ours opens inward.

Since we carry our dinghy on a davit system mounted on the swim platform... an outward-opening transom door could have become an issue for us.
That is another concern. Thanks Chris.

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Make sure you have references from the guy who will be doing the job. You will want to know how many he has done and what he recommends for your situation.

Good luck! I hate hiring out. Gives me loads of stress!! LOL!
I'm fortunate there Donna. He's busy, which is a good sigh.
And he has a reciprocating saw and is not afraid to use it.

Best of all, while chatting he'd mentioned that the previous weekend he'd had to repair the transom of his son's outboard fishing boat. He talked about "removing rotting core" and "strengthening the transom" and how the boat was now better than when new.

The next door neighbor has known Chris for decades and trusts him.
But Chris is busy.

Therein lies the problem. I have hopes. First though another neighbor has a job that is line before mine.

I do have high hopes though Donna. This has literally been on my list almost since I bought Seaweed nine years ago. It's the next-to-last safety feature I want. An autopilot will have to wait because this is more important in my view. At least for another year or two.

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Ours opens out also. A few years ago we had some stress cracks at the transom and the door itself at the hinges. We removed the hinges to reenforced the attachment points.
The fellow Schucker owner (Seaweed is a Schucker) did talk about reinforcing the opening. I'll keep that in mind. Thanks!

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I decided to add the lower stern cleat to allow crossing my stern lines and not block the door swing - or being a tripping hazard when boarding.

I also wanted to add Weaver davits for my inflatable which I place to port - works well as it still leaves room to board with the dingy on place and raised.
Moving a cleat is a great idea. I'd not thought of that. Thanks!!!

And being able to lift Algae is also a consideration though I don't leave her on the swim platform. It's more important to be able to board Seaweed from the water. Too many boats have no way to get back aboard.

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On some boats, the transom provides structural rigidity to the hull. You may want to confirm that your transom door won't impair that rigidity.
Noted. That is important MYTraveler. I'll keep that in mind.

The thinking is that rather than have one that is full height I'll go with 18". That way it won't be so large. The opening will not be so close to the water. I can step over a shorter bulkhead.

A straight walk through (level with the cockpit) is too low in my opinion. I want to step over.

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Originally Posted by RT Firefly View Post
Greetings,
I agree that a properly engineered door that opens outward would not be forced open if slammed by a big wave BUT Ms. J shouldn't be out in conditions that would allow that to occur. So, my vote would be inward opening with two sturdy latches
Thanks RT... Although initially I was leaning outbound opening, I am back to inward. It just seems simpler. Angles so the door will open will also prevent water from coming in.

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Our transom was already cut out and there was a makeshift door in the opening so I didn't have the cut out from the transom . The door I made is in two pieces with the caprail section that hinges on top of the caprail and straddles the door that opens to the inside . It's a funky design but it's all I could come up with . The door center panel is a piece of 1/2 " starboard.
This is ABSOLUTELY what I want. Thank you so much Pack Mule for the great idea. I'd not considered having a caprail AND a tuna door. This just makes so much sense.

Thank you for showing me what I did not know I needed.
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Old 04-20-2017, 01:56 PM   #29
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This is ABSOLUTELY what I want. Thank you so much Pack Mule for the great idea. I'd not considered having a caprail AND a tuna door. This just makes so much sense. Thank you for showing me what I did not know I needed.
Janice, you're the absolute best!
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Old 04-20-2017, 04:16 PM   #30
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Janice, you're the absolute best!
Aw shucks... Thank you Walt.

It is definitely the knowledge base on Trawler Forum that sets this site apart from others. I wish I was half as smart as some of the boaters here. We are blessed to have so many who take the time to participate.

As for me and this project, I am looking forward to seeing the finished result on Seaweed. Still don't have an estimate though. Finding the right person with talent and time is key. I am fortunate.

Thanks for all the above advice. I've been measuring in the cockpit and making plans.

Your friend in the east, J.
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Old 04-20-2017, 05:11 PM   #31
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I dont think it was mentioned here, but we once saw a pre-2000 52' Krogen Express and the side cockpit access door had no hinge. not sure of the terminology but it had a sort of mitre slot arrangement where the door lifted straight up to remove it and it was unattached. when you wanted to close it you slid it downward into the slots on each side (sorry don't have a photo).
It was simple and required no metal hardware. My only concern is that when lifting, you might accidentally drop the door over the side into the water... yikes!
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Old 04-21-2017, 06:59 AM   #32
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I'm fortunate there Donna. He's busy, which is a good sigh.
And he has a reciprocating saw and is not afraid to use it.

Best of all, while chatting he'd mentioned that the previous weekend he'd had to repair the transom of his son's outboard fishing boat. He talked about "removing rotting core" and "strengthening the transom" and how the boat was now better than when new.

The next door neighbor has known Chris for decades and trusts him.
But Chris is busy.

Therein lies the problem. I have hopes. First though another neighbor has a job that is line before mine.

Remembering your engines episodes...

I suspect you might find it useful to pointedly discuss with him how long it will take, when it will be finished, to what degree it will be cosmetically perfect (or at least "good enough" and assuming structurally sound)...

And what you'll do about it if he fails to complete the job on schedule.

Final payment withheld until completion? Maybe make him leave all his tools on board every time he leaves, until the job is complete?

-Chris
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