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Old 09-07-2017, 09:40 PM   #21
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I did tow it across Lake Michigan last year, I would need a much sturdier tow rig if I did much of that.
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Old 09-07-2017, 09:52 PM   #22
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We passed a dead head last week with a diameter of around 36" bobbing slowly up and down 18" out of the water, with 95% of that lunker log suspended vertically under the surface. Hit that in a Taiwan fiberglass boat at 6 knots and my guess it would be like hitting a dock.

I have no clue whether this fellow set up the sinking of his vessel any more than anyone here does, but I have to say that assuming the worst of the man is hardly fair.
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Old 09-07-2017, 10:35 PM   #23
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I see nothing strange in the size of the tender. Here in BC it is very common to tow a larger tender. A number of people on my dock tow 15 foot whalers with boats between 32 and 42 feet. Another group tow 17 foots with boats still less than 50 feet. I have a 34 foot boat and will likely buy a 15 foot tender very soon. I am surprised that the size of a tender would lead someone to assume there is fraud in the air. I am sure there are easier ways to collect insurance rather then bashing your head and getting a helicopter ride with the CG.
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Old 09-07-2017, 11:18 PM   #24
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I don't get the tender questions. Lots of 40-50' boats here towing 13, 15, and 17 foot whalers and the like. Had a similar sighting to Delfin last weekend - huge deadhead with only about 6" above water and 24+" round. Sunny day, nothing distracting me and a slight chop. I missed it by 10' and never saw it until i was passing. Just dumb luck. Tough crowd.
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Old 09-07-2017, 11:39 PM   #25
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I've seen plenty of dead heads even hit a few, they break running gear, it's pretty difficult for a waterloggged piece of wood to hole fiberglass at 7 or 8 knots. However a container is a different story they seem to achieve neutral buoyancy and float just below the water. Hit the corner of one of those and it's an instant hole... As far as a dingy we routinely towed a 20ft'r behind our 42 OA and have an 18ft tender for our 48... no big deal
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Old 09-07-2017, 11:46 PM   #26
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I have no problem with the tender size. We see that all the time

A couple that we shared an anchorage with on more than one occasion has a 46 Nordhavn.

Their skiff was an approx 20' hard top fishing boat. They would anchor the big slow boat and zip arond fishing in the smaller boat.
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Old 09-07-2017, 11:46 PM   #27
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It would not be unusual for a recreational fisherman to tow a large dingy from Astoria Oregon to the Puget Sound for fishing. It's about a 1.5 day trip and can be flat as glass. Traveling single handed is unusual and not allowed by most insurance policies but a coastal policy would not necessarily prohibit this. 10 miles out would put the boat beyond diver access but night transits are done in deep water to avoid the crab pots.

I can't say things smell bad but it doesn't smell good either.
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Old 09-08-2017, 12:01 AM   #28
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I'm sure the insurance will ask all the questions.

However, there's a good chance that it's all exactly as pictured and described.

Years ago I was friends with a man whose brother was known to be terribly dishonest. He had a factory and it caught fire and everything in it lost. Everyone in the area said arson and insurance and an arson investigation was immediately launched. One problem. He had no insurance. He'd never carried any on that facility as insurers didn't trust him so the rates were prohibitive plus he didn't like insurance, about to the level of Seavee. There was no motive that could be found for arson. He was sole owner. He told his brother he didn't blame anyone for being suspicious but this was the one time he was innocent of everything. He suffered a huge loss.

Then sometimes those we trust most are the insurance scammers.
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Old 09-08-2017, 02:59 AM   #29
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The skepticism may be founded but basing that on his dinghy size is not right.
I know and have known people with smaller main boats , down to 32', tow that size of dinghy.
It,s common here for folk to tow large dingbats here. They can cover long distances far quicker in the 'bat than in the larger boat. Often used by sportfishers but simply touring folk too.
Foolish maybe but not automatically crooked.
Also to the point, if you collide with some of the deadheads I,ve seen, submerged logs, the boat is going be damaged, often seriously. Boats have sunk from those things, they are often heavier than the boat., Big enough that it,s like hitting a rock.
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Old 09-08-2017, 05:42 AM   #30
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I would just like to know if he hit something and what it was- and if so has the thing hit been found and dealt with. Is there a FAA type agency for boating where you can look up preliminary reports for accidents?

Based off the timestamp on the rescue video this happened at the end of July. Is that enough time to begin an investigation, put out a report, and/or retrieve the wreck or would it just be left as is?

I don't know enough about boating to know, but I'm looking at maybe the size of the dinghy could simply be something he had from before, or was a deal he picked up cheap, or was the only thing on hand to support his trip out that night. But that is my speculation.

With all the forum members from that general area I still halfway expect someone to log in and know this boat or this person.
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Old 09-08-2017, 08:27 AM   #31
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As mentioned, towing a large runabout is not uncommon. The questions I have are more basic such as traveling alone at night in unfamiliar rock strewn log infested waters.

A dock mate just relayed a story to me where they had sold their DeFever 48 and shortly thereafter it sank while entering Anacortes at night after striking a rock. There are so many ways to sink, most involving poor decision making
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Old 09-08-2017, 09:41 AM   #32
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I have always wanted to have a great tender. My davits strain with a 12 ft, 40hp, that will do 25 knots. But still, this:
https://www.ribeye.co.uk/models/a-600 would be much better matched to my desires. 48 knots, much more stable in a seaway, could stow all the gear I am constantly loading back onto my trawler.

Come on guys, give the guy a break. First he had to convince his wife the 17 ft tender was necessary, now he has to convince all you suspicious nay-sayers.
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Old 09-08-2017, 09:52 AM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Delfin View Post
Where will you scuttle your boat, since that is clearly your plan?


Well since it is so obvious I think I'll just scuttle the plan
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Old 09-08-2017, 11:40 AM   #34
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I assumed the dingy size/ratio discussion was just a little thread drift, not necessarily a smoking gun that the sinking was fishy.
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Old 09-08-2017, 11:58 AM   #35
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I will leave the issue in the hands of the insurance company. Innocent until proved guilty. That principle may allow some guilty individual to slip through the cracks but protects the innocent from wrongful blame.
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Old 09-08-2017, 04:04 PM   #36
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Arrow

Quote:
Originally Posted by agm_66 View Post
I would just like to know if he hit something and what it was- and if so has the thing hit been found and dealt with. Is there a FAA type agency for boating where you can look up preliminary reports for accidents?

Based off the timestamp on the rescue video this happened at the end of July. Is that enough time to begin an investigation, put out a report, and/or retrieve the wreck or would it just be left as is?

I don't know enough about boating to know, but I'm looking at maybe the size of the dinghy could simply be something he had from before, or was a deal he picked up cheap, or was the only thing on hand to support his trip out that night. But that is my speculation.

With all the forum members from that general area I still halfway expect someone to log in and know this boat or this person.
Your questions are not likely to get answers yet. Coast Guard may issue a report. Deadheads, containers, or other large semi submerged objects are a fact of life. Once hit the last thing on anyone's mind is specifically
Identify what it was or locating it so "it can be dealt with". This is not a car collision where everything stays put after the fact. The object moves on the tides/currents, may actually finally sink after the boat sinks but miles away.
Objects can be as already mentioned, submerged just below the surface and not to be seen. It could have been a section of floating dock.
The guy may have been foolish to night travel single handing but maybe has done it before and been fine. Whether you understand it yet or not , many of us singlehand and with wife/friends joining later at some other place.
Mybe he is a retired fisherman who used to single travel.

Wait for the report before any more speculation.
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Old 09-08-2017, 05:45 PM   #37
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I was looking at 17' center consoles but after reading this thread doing so may limit our future trawlers to above the 65-70' range.
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Old 09-08-2017, 07:55 PM   #38
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Going up to Desolation Sound with my 13' Calypso on davits, towing a 15' center console Smokercraft fishing boat should of raised a few eyebrows. But it didn't, its pretty common in the PNW, especially with blow boats.

Single-handing it up the Washington Coast at night now, not my cup of tea. But I seem to recall one of our group single-handedly making the crossing from the Azores and Ireland not that long ago?
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Old 09-08-2017, 10:46 PM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sunchaser View Post
As mentioned, towing a large runabout is not uncommon. The questions I have are more basic such as traveling alone at night in unfamiliar rock strewn log infested waters.

A dock mate just relayed a story to me where they had sold their DeFever 48 and shortly thereafter it sank while entering Anacortes at night after striking a rock. There are so many ways to sink, most involving poor decision making
Twice in the last couple of years we've passed a 48' or so trawler towing two, count 'em, two 14' sailboats. Masts up, jibs furled. I have no clue why, or for that matter how. Next time I see him, I'll take a picture.
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Old 09-08-2017, 10:48 PM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ka_sea_ta View Post
I've seen plenty of dead heads even hit a few, they break running gear, it's pretty difficult for a waterloggged piece of wood to hole fiberglass at 7 or 8 knots. However a container is a different story they seem to achieve neutral buoyancy and float just below the water. Hit the corner of one of those and it's an instant hole... As far as a dingy we routinely towed a 20ft'r behind our 42 OA and have an 18ft tender for our 48... no big deal
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