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Old 05-11-2018, 03:07 AM   #21
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It maybe possible at 300 kph
yea, right, I do try to never tow that fast.
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Old 05-11-2018, 03:09 AM   #22
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Most definitely in neutral. The prop has enough bite to turn the power head while towing
Ever ran a tank dry?
Boat keeps going forward in gear put prop slips with a click and that's at 20 knots let alone 8.
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Old 05-11-2018, 07:27 AM   #23
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The drag of the leg/prop in the water will/may prevent the dink from racing down the face of a wave. I’ve heard dinghies can actually pass the towing boat when the waves get large. In a thread in the recent past draging a line w a bit of chain would tend to tame the wild dink.

And I agree w MTTraveler that pumping seawater through the powerhead could cause problems. The rubber vanes of the pump impeller should/may reduce volume of water but ......
We used to tow an 11 foot whaler that used to pass us on occassion, when being towed! Exciting to watch it surf by a couple of feet from ramming the stern! Some of the OB in the water (not full down) did seem to help. I never really gave it much thought as to neutral or in gear, and we towed it two different years, all the way to the Bahamas and back, with two different outboards Mercury 25 2 stroke, and 9.8 aNissan 9.8 2 stroke, with no ill effects to either motor that I can determine.
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Old 05-11-2018, 08:46 AM   #24
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Last year Alaska Seaduction talked about a new swim platform dinghy storage system addition. Then some of us have davits. Why tow at all?
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Old 05-11-2018, 09:51 AM   #25
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Sunchaser,
Most people tow because they usta be sailboaters. Sailboaters tow because they don’t very often overnight in marinas. They like to use their sails and hate engines and they don’t go very far. That limits their exposure to seas that would danger the dinghy. Anchoring out makes towing viable to a great extent. Also less affluent people cruising are less likely to have expensive dinghy handling things like cranes and good davits.

And Sunchaser if I was a sailboater I could probably think of more to add.
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Old 05-11-2018, 12:27 PM   #26
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And Sunchaser if I was a sailboater I could probably think of more to add.

True, but if you were a lowly sailboater you wouldn't be on TF and you'd have missed all this fun!
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Old 05-11-2018, 04:05 PM   #27
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About1 in 20 sailboaters on the Atlantic ICW us their sails on a daily basis.
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Old 05-11-2018, 04:12 PM   #28
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About1 in 20 sailboaters on the Atlantic ICW us their sails on a daily basis.
A little drift here.....but yeah.
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Old 05-11-2018, 05:11 PM   #29
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About1 in 20 sailboaters on the Atlantic ICW us their sails on a daily basis.
You are being generous. I'd say 1 in 100 in places where it is practical.
I'd also say that 1 in 20 is what you see on the Atlantic Ocean coastal cruising, not to mention the big sounds and bays. Even on days that would be great sailing weather. Most coastal cruising sailboats are simply single engine displacement express style motorboats with a big mast sticking out.
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Old 05-11-2018, 05:56 PM   #30
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Sunchaser,
Most people tow because they usta be sailboaters. Sailboaters tow because they don’t very often overnight in marinas. They like to use their sails and hate engines and they don’t go very far. That limits their exposure to seas that would danger the dinghy. Anchoring out makes towing viable to a great extent. Also less affluent people cruising are less likely to have expensive dinghy handling things like cranes and good davits.

And Sunchaser if I was a sailboater I could probably think of more to add.
I have a dinghy lifting thing called a mast. They are expensive, but it came with the boat. There is a separate halyard for lifting the dinghy onto the saloon roof.
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Old 05-11-2018, 05:58 PM   #31
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About1 in 20 sailboaters on the Atlantic ICW us their sails on a daily basis.
If I visited the ICW I doubt if I'd be raising the sails or lifting my dinghy. Not really required for flat water.
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Old 05-11-2018, 06:43 PM   #32
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We used to tow an 11 foot whaler that used to pass us on occasion, when being towed! Exciting to watch it surf by a couple of feet from ramming the stern!....
Towing, outboard in gear,and running, is not recommended.
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Old 05-11-2018, 07:03 PM   #33
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Mast

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I have a dinghy lifting thing called a mast. They are expensive, but it came with the boat. There is a separate halyard for lifting the dinghy onto the saloon roof.
AusCan,
Yes I would have same if we weren’t under covered moorage .. low covered moorage.
I have in mind a fold down inverted “V” type mast made from aluminum tubing much like UL aircraft.
But since we will be anchoring more this summer we may give a go at towing again. My thoughts on this are reflected in my previous recent post.
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Old 05-11-2018, 08:19 PM   #34
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Towing, outboard in gear,and running, is not recommended.
Another narrow escape!
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Old 05-13-2018, 06:45 AM   #35
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"They like to use their sails and hate engines and they don’t go very far."

That's probably why sails have crossed oceans perhaps 1,000 times more often than marine motorists?
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Old 05-13-2018, 08:14 AM   #36
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Towing a tillered OB with engine down will necessitate a way to keep the dink aimed ahead. Thinking ropes here on the tiller. My 15 hp 2s merc has loose steering in spite of how I tighten the swivel adj screw. Uncommanded full lock on the OB will make some excitement in any seas.
I kind of like the drag the line idea behind the dink and keep the motor up. But, I'd darn sure make it a floating line if crossing the banks.

Sea state is a factor. I've witnessed a small dink totally invert and submerge behind a 41 morgan, obviously going slow.
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