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Old 02-14-2017, 12:07 PM   #21
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I guess a lot depends upon where you might be towing and where you might be visiting.
Here in the Northeast (LI sound and areas nearby) towing to most marinas is not a big deal - we call ahead and have had no issues with slips or with spots to put the larger inflatables. These larger self bailing inflatables (16'-24') tend to tow much easier then the shorter ones. With a 47' boat and speeds in the area of 7 knots the fuel consumption was not really measureable. When towing the largest 24' at about #3,500 and at 16-18 knots the fuel use was right around 5% more with the tow in place. On one typical 200 mile trip 'loop' that added about 9 gallons of extra diesel used.
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Old 02-14-2017, 12:36 PM   #22
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I was really just thinking about the Bahamas. If I did it I think I would trailer it to the FL east coast and pick it up there. I can't imagine pulling something like that all the way from Texas to FL, through the locks and all the tight areas around the barges. That would suck.
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Old 02-14-2017, 12:51 PM   #23
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Check with your insurance company. A friend last year contacted his insurance company (Geico Marine) about towing his 18.5' Key West behind his 40' MainShip from Florida to the Bahamas. He forwarded the response to me.

Underwriter confirms that there currently is no exclusion for towing the skiff, but that an endorsement will be issued to exclude such use due to the size of the skiff. That means the yacht policy will not provide liability coverage for towing the 18' skiff. I will forward policy change documents to you upon receipt. Emergency towing would not be subject to this exclusion.
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Old 02-14-2017, 03:11 PM   #24
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Check with your insurance company. A friend last year contacted his insurance company (Geico Marine) about towing his 18.5' Key West behind his 40' MainShip from Florida to the Bahamas. He forwarded the response to me.

Underwriter confirms that there currently is no exclusion for towing the skiff, but that an endorsement will be issued to exclude such use due to the size of the skiff. That means the yacht policy will not provide liability coverage for towing the 18' skiff. I will forward policy change documents to you upon receipt. Emergency towing would not be subject to this exclusion.
However, typically one would have insurance on the tender which would cover it so having liability coverage on the main boat wouldn't be an issue.
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Old 02-14-2017, 04:44 PM   #25
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Most of our trips north, we towed a 20ft Hewescraft. We never had any issues when we would go into a dock we just tied it to the side of the boat and asked for a side tie... The fuel consumption didn't go up but the cruising speed dropped about 10%... It is really nice to have a capable tender to fish, crab and other activities that are a pain to do in the big boat....
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Old 02-14-2017, 05:07 PM   #26
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However, typically one would have insurance on the tender which would cover it so having liability coverage on the main boat wouldn't be an issue.
You may be right but our friend's state side coverage wouldn't cover him for the Bahamas.

I cut and pasted what our insurance policy reads for our tender/dinghy. As our friend said "maybe I asked too many questions".

“Dinghy” means a boat not to exceed 14’ length overall, including an outboard motor that does not exceed 40 horsepower, if so equipped. The maximum coverage for any dinghy and its outboard is $15,000. The dinghy must be primarily used as the tender to the insured boat listed on the Declarations Page.


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Old 02-14-2017, 06:03 PM   #27
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Most of our trips north, we towed a 20ft Hewescraft. We never had any issues when we would go into a dock we just tied it to the side of the boat and asked for a side tie... The fuel consumption didn't go up but the cruising speed dropped about 10%... It is really nice to have a capable tender to fish, crab and other activities that are a pain to do in the big boat....
That works if there is a side tie available. I have been to lots of places where that is not the case. I also have been to plenty of fuel docks where there isn't really enough room to have a tender tied to the side. (Thinking of Narrows Marina in Day Island or Breakwater at Pt. Defiance when it was still in operation.)
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Old 02-14-2017, 06:27 PM   #28
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I've towed my 17' c-console several hundred miles on the rivers, through locks and on Lake Michigan. Never had any problems but always had at least 2 people onboard to handle the tow gear when locking.
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Old 02-14-2017, 07:57 PM   #29
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The previous owner of my monk left fuel use records from towing a BW 13 ft Sport He dropped from over 3nmpg to just over 2 nmpg and avg about 6 kts
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Old 02-14-2017, 07:58 PM   #30
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You may be right but our friend's state side coverage wouldn't cover him for the Bahamas.
Now, as to towing. Guess I'm one of the last holdouts. I don't like the thought or any aspect of it. I know many captains who have done it for years and keep telling us we should do it. We do have RIBS with us so that covers most of our needs. If we feel a need for something larger then we just rent wherever we are. I just have a mental block when it comes to towing long distances under variable conditions.
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Old 02-14-2017, 11:33 PM   #31
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Now, as to towing. Guess I'm one of the last holdouts. I don't like the thought or any aspect of it. I know many captains who have done it for years and keep telling us we should do it. We do have RIBS with us so that covers most of our needs. If we feel a need for something larger then we just rent wherever we are. I just have a mental block when it comes to towing long distances under variable conditions.

Yeah, something that makes me pause is towing and getting caught in really rough seas due to weather changes or a bad forecast. I guess if it got too bad you would just have to cut the tow away and take the loss.
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Old 02-15-2017, 12:47 AM   #32
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That works if there is a side tie available. I have been to lots of places where that is not the case. I also have been to plenty of fuel docks where there isn't really enough room to have a tender tied to the side. (Thinking of Narrows Marina in Day Island or Breakwater at Pt. Defiance when it was still in operation.)
Never been in those fuel docks, when we fuel we tend to take 7 to 800 gallons so I'm looking for good pricing, I've fueled at Oak Harbor and Poulsbo with no issues. The tender adds 8ft to the beam even in tight fairways there hasn't been any issues.... One time we had to tie it off to the swim step so the tender was perpendicular to the boat in order to get into a slip it was weird looking looking but it worked....I guess you just do what you have to....
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Old 02-15-2017, 12:10 PM   #33
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We tow our 17' center console all the time, Iv'e only been in one situation where I thought we may have to cut the tow line, we were between Chub and Eleuthera in 8-10' footers with a undersized tow line (We've since got a Dyneema one made) and it just kept getting yanked, I was expecting the line to snap but it never did. When we come into a marina we'll put the boat on the hip if the lisp allows, otherwise I'll send someone in with it and I'll be on the boat, either by myself or with a hand depending on who came. But it's pretty easy to manage.
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Old 02-15-2017, 12:37 PM   #34
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We towed this 19' Rib for many years - it was pretty light, had lots of room and could get us around very well when anchored or at marina's. Self bailing and easy to get on and off ...



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Old 02-15-2017, 12:54 PM   #35
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Yeah, something that makes me pause is towing and getting caught in really rough seas due to weather changes or a bad forecast. I guess if it got too bad you would just have to cut the tow away and take the loss.
There are several ways to deal with that.

Including AIS, tracking devices/services, etc. And, depending where you might have to cut it loose, clipping on an anchor to the tow line before you cut it loose so it can hopefully self anchor in shallow water before hitting the beach.
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Old 02-15-2017, 02:07 PM   #36
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We tow our 17' center console all the time, Iv'e only been in one situation where I thought we may have to cut the tow line, we were between Chub and Eleuthera in 8-10' footers with a undersized tow line (We've since got a Dyneema one made) and it just kept getting yanked, I was expecting the line to snap but it never did. When we come into a marina we'll put the boat on the hip if the lisp allows, otherwise I'll send someone in with it and I'll be on the boat, either by myself or with a hand depending on who came. But it's pretty easy to manage.
Wifey B: YAY! Oliver's here.

Is that your beloved Dusky, you tow? Could never let that have to be cut away.
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Old 02-15-2017, 06:58 PM   #37
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We tow our 17' center console all the time, Iv'e only been in one situation where I thought we may have to cut the tow line, we were between Chub and Eleuthera in 8-10' footers with a undersized tow line (We've since got a Dyneema one made) and it just kept getting yanked, I was expecting the line to snap but it never did. When we come into a marina we'll put the boat on the hip if the lisp allows, otherwise I'll send someone in with it and I'll be on the boat, either by myself or with a hand depending on who came. But it's pretty easy to manage.

Hey Oliver! Long time no see.

I had forgotten you often tow a big boat in the Bahamas. Thanks.
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Old 02-15-2017, 06:59 PM   #38
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There are several ways to deal with that.



Including AIS, tracking devices/services, etc. And, depending where you might have to cut it loose, clipping on an anchor to the tow line before you cut it loose so it can hopefully self anchor in shallow water before hitting the beach.

Ahh. Good ideas. Thanks.
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Old 02-15-2017, 07:10 PM   #39
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We towed our 13' Whaler in some pretty sporty offshore stuff without an issue, at about 9 knots. I could see going as small as a 11' Whaler, but nothing lighter than that. I would guess that a Triumph that size would be no problema.

BTW have someone who knows them look at that Yamaha. Or wait til you get to the Bahamas. Those engines are revered in those parts and the Carribean.
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Old 02-15-2017, 07:37 PM   #40
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We towed our 13' Whaler in some pretty sporty offshore stuff without an issue, at about 9 knots. I could see going as small as a 11' Whaler, but nothing lighter than that. I would guess that a Triumph that size would be no problema.



BTW have someone who knows them look at that Yamaha. Or wait til you get to the Bahamas. Those engines are revered in those parts and the Carribean.

Yeah you're probably right on the Yamaha. It's just pissing me off.
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