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Old 04-30-2018, 08:28 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by Maerin View Post
Bitch wings.

Stand on the foredeck with arms akimbo, watch intently. If that doesn't help, then a friendly "Hi!! Welcome to the anchorage! Do you think it might be easier for you to move now, or in the dark at three in the morning??"

Snugglers.....
Very good one!!!!
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Old 04-30-2018, 08:32 AM   #22
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In a crowded anchorage (e.g. Block Island Great Salt Pond during the weekend), I'll anchor in as shallow water as tides and my draw allow (keeps most sailboats away), but that means you're surrounded by other shallow draft powerboats that swing widely in wind. I'll always attach an anchor buoy. I'll watch as boats anchor near me, and based on my scope and their scope, and wind direction, I'll ask the boat to move if I think they're too close, With all chain, my scope is relatively short, maybe 60' in 5 feet minimum water. If high winds and storms are forecasted, I don't leave the boat. Unfortunately, watching poor anchoring habits and boats dragging is part of the entertainment at BI. As a general rule, I avoid places like BI on the weekends. As a last resort, if closely surrounded by crazies, I'll move to deeper water further from shore.
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Old 04-30-2018, 08:53 AM   #23
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If anyone gets too close for comfort and doesn't take the hint, just request their insurance information "in advance, just in case your boat hits us in the middle of the night."
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Old 04-30-2018, 09:37 AM   #24
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I feel lucky that up here where I am cruising, the places where I am anchoring are mostly desert.

L
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Old 04-30-2018, 09:46 AM   #25
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If anyone gets too close for comfort and doesn't take the hint, just request their insurance information "in advance, just in case your boat hits us in the middle of the night."
This is a good idea on several levels! It gets the point across without being rude and if anything happens the new arrival can't evade responsibility. Making it about insurance removes a bit of the emotion involved in criticizing another's seamanship.
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Old 04-30-2018, 10:05 AM   #26
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Many of the anchorages in our area very crowded. It used to bother us too. The one thing I've found is, no matter how right you are, and/or how wrong someone else is, they will never accept that criticism gracefully, no matter how nicely you tell them.

I had a guy this week blame me for almost hitting him when he cut in front of me. Last week my sister in law got rear-ended at a stop sign. The person that rear-ended her was outraged that my sister-in-law "Stopped abruptly in front of her" (at a stop sign).

About the only thing I'll do is if someone drops close and is floating over my anchor, I'll mention if I plan on leaving in the morning. They don't have to leave, but they will assisting with my departure if I need to nudge the over to retrieve my anchor.
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Old 04-30-2018, 10:48 AM   #27
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About the only thing I'll do is if someone drops close and is floating over my anchor, I'll mention if I plan on leaving in the morning. They don't have to leave, but they will assisting with my departure if I need to nudge the over to retrieve my anchor.
I do that also, but if it looks like they have anchoring skills it doesn't bother me. I have had my pulpit even with the swim platform a couple of times when pulling my hook. Their reaction when they look and see how close I am is priceless.
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Old 04-30-2018, 10:50 AM   #28
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I'm still a bit traumatized from being hit by that sailboat while I was anchored, and I certainly don't want a repeat of that.



Thanks,
Mike
We had to learn our lesson the hard way too: never anchor in Sucia Bay if the tall ship Hawaiian Chieftain is there. They sleep very soundly and don't keep an anchor watch, human or electronic. Although, after waking me at 5:00am one morning with a hard bump, they probably do now!
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Old 04-30-2018, 10:51 AM   #29
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Kind of on the same. Anchored in a cove and a sail boat anchors behind you. Then complains about the smell of your generator.

I started my 3208s covering his boat with smoke and he pulled anchor........
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Old 04-30-2018, 10:51 AM   #30
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Call me crazy, but I deploy fenders when near other boats.
Mark,
I know .. it’s just that you’ve got so many friends ya never know when one will show up and slam into your rail brandishing bottles of something.
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Old 04-30-2018, 10:53 AM   #31
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Kind of on the same. Anchored in a cove and a sail boat anchors behind you. Then complains about the smell of your generator.

I started my 3208s covering his boat with smoke and he pulled anchor........
Boy .. you really showed him!
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Old 04-30-2018, 10:55 AM   #32
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Mark,
I know .. it’s just that you’ve got so many friends ya never know when one will show up and slam into your rail brandishing bottles of something.
Now, I'll admit to tossing fenders out on both sides if it's tight. It's not my fault if you interpret that as my getting ready to build a raft and give me a little extra room
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Old 04-30-2018, 10:59 AM   #33
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One of the problems is the mix of power boats and sail boats in a crowded anchorage. Both swing very differently as tides and wind changes. I like to have at least 3:1 scope all chain for overnight anchoring which can mean 200-250' of chain out in the PNW. There is always someone that thinks 1:1 scope is fine. Finally, never be downwind of boats rafted together at anchorage unless you enjoy complete pandemonium at 3am as the raft drags towards you. Been there. Tying the stern to shore helps in very deep water but has its own challenges.
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Old 04-30-2018, 11:14 AM   #34
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I have also found that when power and sails anchor that there are different expectations while at anchor. A lot of sailboats I have seen in my travels tend to run short scopes (no windlass and don't want to pull up alot of rode), while power run out scope of at least 3:1 or more. Then there is always the one or two sailboats that drag or break their anchorage.

I will have to admit I have anchored too close in a crowded anchorage without much choice. Nanaimo B.C., comes to mind. One issue I had last year in choosing a spot to anchor was entering such the anchorage and then judging the right spot to set the anchor, then running out scope as to not swing into someone. I'm getting better, but still need practice.
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Old 04-30-2018, 11:22 AM   #35
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If people complain that you’re too close I’m thinking you can ignore them or move. The last time that happened to me I moved think’in if we swung close or worse later on it would be me w egg on my face.
But if one is sure you’re far enough away considering the looks of his showing rode, the location of shallows or/and other hazzards l’d just stay put. All they can do is yell at you. I don’t have Sea-Ductions option as my engine dosn’t smoke.

The only real solution is to anchor/moore to mooring balls like in a park. A prime example of this is in Montague Harbour in BC. Many more boats will fit in the harbour and no worries about swinging. Excellent solution.
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Old 04-30-2018, 11:35 AM   #36
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Sea Duction wrote;
“I have also found that when power and sails anchor that there are different expectations while at anchor. A lot of sailboats I have seen in my travels tend to run short scopes (no windlass and don't want to pull up alot of rode), while power run out scope of at least 3:1 or more.”

Think you mucked up there dude. Sailboats are probably more prone to run long scope but it’s the nylon line that dictates the scope. Even if they anchor shallow the swing is great because of the nylon line. Fishing boats in SE Alaska hate to see smallish sailboats comming cuse they tend to take up the whole bay swinging. So they anchor shallow but at long scope.
This of course varies w boats, rodes and skippers so I speak as a rule of thumb.
I think we need to give a bit of way or room to sailboats while anchoring as they are at a disadvantage w their light rodes and deep draft.
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Old 04-30-2018, 11:52 AM   #37
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Kind of on the same. Anchored in a cove and a sail boat anchors behind you. Then complains about the smell of your generator.

I started my 3208s covering his boat with smoke and he pulled anchor........
Good one...
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Old 04-30-2018, 12:01 PM   #38
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I tend to put out a lot of scope. I always have, on my sailboats and on “Kinship”. This makes me sleep more soundly at night as I’m not concerned about dragging with a 5:1 scope of all chain. However, this creates two other concerns. The first is that if other boaters use short scope, then we swing differently. The second is that other boaters are more likely to drop their anchor over the top of my road.
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Old 04-30-2018, 01:10 PM   #39
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We hang fenders but they're not likely to benefit. Most damage is from bow and anchor pulpit of attacking boat or to the same area of attacked boat. Side to side collisions aren't where the greatest damage occurs.

We ask them not to anchor there, but if we feel the situation is perilous, then we move. Ultimately, we can only control out boat and we're not going to remain anchored where we're uncomfortable.
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Old 04-30-2018, 01:23 PM   #40
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Dave I don’t know where there are anchorages that will swallow many boats at 5-1 scope.
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