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Old 01-30-2018, 11:34 AM   #61
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We also love the open layout of the Viking/princess sport cruisers. We spend weeks at a time as a family of four on our 50.
We did the loop in a Sunseeker.

For the OP, just as we said not to focus only on trawlers, don't fully reject them either. Remain open minded. You may end up with the perfect boat, but one that hasn't even crossed your mind yet. Concentrate on desired use and purposes, then just compare boats to it.
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Old 01-31-2018, 08:05 AM   #62
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"The biggest difference is the build of most trawlers as opposed to a cruiser. Trawlers are built to go out into blue water either coastal cruising or crossing oceans. Most of your smaller "gas" boats are not."

Depends , this concept is pushed by boat sales folks , and trawler owners who have never been to sea.

Most "trawlers" are not built as sea boats , huge windows in the PH that could not stand up to even one breaking wave , as well as limited fuel preclude most from making a passage.

A run down the coast can be done , but so can the same be said for most same size motor yachts.

The build requirements (scantlings) for a passage making boat cause them to be about 300% more expensive to build and outfit .

The extra fuel , water and stores take room from the vessel so even larger ones may feel cramped.

The concept "Trawlers are built to go out into blue water either coastal cruising or crossing oceans." is only true for about 1 boat in 100.
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Old 01-31-2018, 08:30 AM   #63
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"The biggest difference is the build of most trawlers as opposed to a cruiser. Trawlers are built to go out into blue water either coastal cruising or crossing oceans. Most of your smaller "gas" boats are not."

Depends , this concept is pushed by boat sales folks , and trawler owners who have never been to sea.

Most "trawlers" are not built as sea boats , huge windows in the PH that could not stand up to even one breaking wave , as well as limited fuel preclude most from making a passage.

A run down the coast can be done , but so can the same be said for most same size motor yachts.

The build requirements (scantlings) for a passage making boat cause them to be about 300% more expensive to build and outfit .

The extra fuel , water and stores take room from the vessel so even larger ones may feel cramped.

The concept "Trawlers are built to go out into blue water either coastal cruising or crossing oceans." is only true for about 1 boat in 100.
Where did you get the statistic, 1 boat in 100 are sea vessels? Strongly disagree with this. I was taking 5-8 footers starboard coming out of the gulf stream when all weather was forecasted to be flat. Southerly performed beautifully. Donít get me wrong, it was not a comfortable ride, but a safe one.
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Old 01-31-2018, 10:17 AM   #64
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Where did you get the statistic, 1 boat in 100 are sea vessels? Strongly disagree with this. I was taking 5-8 footers starboard coming out of the gulf stream when all weather was forecasted to be flat. Southerly performed beautifully. Don’t get me wrong, it was not a comfortable ride, but a safe one.

I would guess Fred's not saying boatloads of vessels can't go out in oceans... but rather most are not built to do multiple intentional Atlantic or Pacific (or whatever) passages.

Our boat could also do OK in seas you describe -- I don't wannq be there at the time -- and there's an online blog out there where some folks actually did take our model to St. Thomas, got really beat up en route, and the boat did fine. We also routinely go outside when the opportunity presents itself... but I wouldn't describe our boat as ocean-going in the Nordhavn (for example) sense. Not just about fuel capacity, but also design: our windows are too big, the interior is too open with too much (self-induced) loose furniture, etc.

My own informal approach might be to ask myself if I would be "this" (candidate) boat for a trip from the Chesapeake to Barcelona (or some such)? The boat we have now? Not so much...

OTOH, I wouldn't really hesitate to cross from FL to the islands...

That's just my interpretation, though; FF can answer for himself.

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Old 01-31-2018, 02:51 PM   #65
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I would guess Fred's not saying boatloads of vessels can't go out in oceans... but rather most are not built to do multiple intentional Atlantic or Pacific (or whatever) passages.

Our boat could also do OK in seas you describe -- I don't wannq be there at the time -- and there's an online blog out there where some folks actually did take our model to St. Thomas, got really beat up en route, and the boat did fine. We also routinely go outside when the opportunity presents itself... but I wouldn't describe our boat as ocean-going in the Nordhavn (for example) sense. Not just about fuel capacity, but also design: our windows are too big, the interior is too open with too much (self-induced) loose furniture, etc.

My own informal approach might be to ask myself if I would be "this" (candidate) boat for a trip from the Chesapeake to Barcelona (or some such)? The boat we have now? Not so much...

OTOH, I wouldn't really hesitate to cross from FL to the islands...

That's just my interpretation, though; FF can answer for himself.

-Chris
Wifey B: It's really boat vs location. And very few people have passagemakers, boats equipped to cross great expanses of oceans. That's what takes a whole lot more boat. That's the Nordhavn's, KK's, Selenes, and some of others. That's not what is needed for the Great Lakes. You're never many hundreds of miles from shore or from fuel or even pump outs and groceries. Yes, the lakes get rough, the Chesapeake gets rough, but that still doesn't require a passagemaker and isn't necessarily pleasant in one either. We just crossed 421 nm of the Gulf of Mexico but that still wasn't passagemaking. We were never that far from shore or escape, didn't need huge amounts of fuel. Most boats on TF could have made the trip, some just faster than others. A few don't have the fuel range.
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Old 01-31-2018, 04:21 PM   #66
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Wifey B: It's really boat vs location. And very few people have passagemakers, boats equipped to cross great expanses of oceans. That's what takes a whole lot more boat. That's the Nordhavn's, KK's, Selenes, and some of others. That's not what is needed for the Great Lakes. You're never many hundreds of miles from shore or from fuel or even pump outs and groceries. Yes, the lakes get rough, the Chesapeake gets rough, but that still doesn't require a passagemaker and isn't necessarily pleasant in one either. We just crossed 421 nm of the Gulf of Mexico but that still wasn't passagemaking. We were never that far from shore or escape, didn't need huge amounts of fuel. Most boats on TF could have made the trip, some just faster than others. A few don't have the fuel range.
We enjoy: Our floater goes a fair way [500 mi] pretty slow 6 knts, Or a short way [180 mi] relatively fast [17 knts]. She is simply, for sure, a self contained fun little "pleasure boat". And... I Like It that way!
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Old 01-31-2018, 05:03 PM   #67
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We enjoy: Our floater goes a fair way [500 mi] pretty slow 6 knts, Or a short way [180 mi] relatively fast [17 knts]. She is simply, for sure, a self contained fun little "pleasure boat". And... I Like It that way!
A lot of people enjoy their boats in similar ways. Just the boat right for your use.
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Old 01-31-2018, 05:39 PM   #68
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A lot of people enjoy their boats in similar ways. Just the boat right for your use.
Pennies on the hundred dollar bill!!


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