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Old 06-15-2020, 01:51 PM   #1
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Teak Deck - remove screws but leave the teak??

Our teak decks are tired, worn and a few bungs are missing. In checking it out I found that there appears to have been work in the past to seal screws and glue down strip points. There is no indication of leaking anywhere.

The teak is sealed / glued to the substrate and doesn't come up easily at all.

My question:

Why not just pull the screws, drill out the holes a bit, fill with epoxy (assuming there isn't any indication of wetness while drilling out the holes), sand and recaulk while leaving the original teak in place?

No more screw holes, no more leaking (if there ever was).

Second questions:

Concerning the stiffness that the teak might be providing I am considering removing the teak and putting down an expensive layer of G 10 with epoxy and a traditional non-skid coating on top.

Thoughts?? I'm also considering the coating option discussed on another thread. Removing the high areas of the caulk is pretty easy and a sanding would / possibly / hopefully stop the telegraphing of the caulk lines.
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Old 06-15-2020, 02:23 PM   #2
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You'd have a 'floating deck' like a floating floor, with nothing holding it down.

You'd be better off removing the deck, drilling and sealing the holes, then installing a faux teak deck in it's place.
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Old 06-15-2020, 02:32 PM   #3
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They are held down pretty tight with the sealant / adhesive. It takes a lot to pry them up so I stopped after the first one broke. Fortunately I can glue that one back without it looking weird - if I got that route.

Considering how strong the teak is it must be providing a decent amount of stiffness that would be lost with the faux teak unless I also add some glass.
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Old 06-15-2020, 03:01 PM   #4
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I think my your right. Most of the decking will just want to stay where it is.

I bet you it would hold together for a bit. Maybe even a season. Then bits would eventually start coming up of breaking off. Even worse, create a tripping hazard.

That being said, may not be the best use of resources. If your gonna do it, you should do it and make a permanent solution.

On the other hand, Iím sure you can get another season of two out of it as is and figure out finances or a better plan.

Not a bad idea though.

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Old 06-15-2020, 03:27 PM   #5
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The teak was probably never factored into the structural schedule. I would worry that I would be cutting off the top of a can of worms that would be difficult and expensive to put back on.
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Old 06-15-2020, 03:54 PM   #6
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I started removing the old caulk and screws and sanded with 60 grit. So far so good. Getting the screws out is the hardest part as most of them I have to take a razor knife to clean them so the bit fits into them enough to remove them.

Nothing seems loose at all. If anything starts to look loose I'll try some black 4200 and lead weights.
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Old 06-15-2020, 04:10 PM   #7
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"Why not just pull the screws, drill out the holes a bit, fill with epoxy (assuming there isn't any indication of wetness while drilling out the holes), sand and recaulk while leaving the original teak in place?

No more screw holes, no more leaking (if there ever was).
"

To the OP. That is exactly what I do, it works a treat.
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Old 06-15-2020, 04:45 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by Andiamo2018 View Post
I started removing the old caulk and screws and sanded with 60 grit. So far so good. Getting the screws out is the hardest part as most of them I have to take a razor knife to clean them so the bit fits into them enough to remove them.

Nothing seems loose at all. If anything starts to look loose I'll try some black 4200 and lead weights.
3m 4000 is UV resistant.
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Old 06-15-2020, 04:50 PM   #9
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I pulled the teak on my flybridge, it was not fun but not a huge task. I have now painted the deck and walkway on the lower level. I learned a lot along the way and once I complete the job I'll point out my mistakes and post some pictures. So far I am happy with the results.

I bought an electric caulk removal tool from Defender and a spare set of blades and tips. It is unbelievable how well it works. So while the job does not look perfect I have finally stopped all the leaks in the teak deck. Watch for a future post detailing the job.

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Old 06-15-2020, 05:46 PM   #10
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I think that if the deck core is solid and dry then I would immediately proceed to removing the teak deck and fiberglassing it. Reason why is that sooner or later the coring will get wet and then it will be a much much bigger job to replace the wet coring. If the coring is wet now then now is the time to bite the bullet and replace the core and reglass the deck. The teak decks will cause wet core at some point unless it is a later boat with glued down teak vice screwed down teak. I know this isnít what you want to hear but it is reality.
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Old 06-15-2020, 06:26 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Andiamo2018 View Post
Our teak decks are tired, worn and a few bungs are missing. In checking it out I found that there appears to have been work in the past to seal screws and glue down strip points. There is no indication of leaking anywhere.

The teak is sealed / glued to the substrate and doesn't come up easily at all.

My question:

Why not just pull the screws, drill out the holes a bit, fill with epoxy (assuming there isn't any indication of wetness while drilling out the holes), sand and recaulk while leaving the original teak in place?

No more screw holes, no more leaking (if there ever was).

Second questions:

Concerning the stiffness that the teak might be providing I am considering removing the teak and putting down an expensive layer of G 10 with epoxy and a traditional non-skid coating on top.

Thoughts?? I'm also considering the coating option discussed on another thread. Removing the high areas of the caulk is pretty easy and a sanding would / possibly / hopefully stop the telegraphing of the caulk lines.
Iíve been doing exactly that. Remove the bung and screw, drill down with 3/8th drill through top layer fiberglass, into the core, but not through the bottom layer of glass. Then fill with epoxy and pop in the bung. I cant speak for your boat but on the Grand Banks those decks are glued down real good. No screws needed.
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Old 06-15-2020, 09:24 PM   #12
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I'm excited about having nice teak decks again! The hardest part has been cleaning the screw heads. The channels where the caulking goes has gotten really shallow so I might need to make a router guide and make them deeper. Or sand them out entirely and have a totally smooth teak surface
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Old 06-15-2020, 10:03 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by Andiamo2018 View Post
I'm excited about having nice teak decks again! The hardest part has been cleaning the screw heads. The channels where the caulking goes has gotten really shallow so I might need to make a router guide and make them deeper. Or sand them out entirely and have a totally smooth teak surface
For at least the last 25 years, the laying of teak decks has been without any screws. The area to be laid is laid out on patterns on the shop floor and the caulking is put down between the boards. Once set up, a layer of similar caulking is troweled onto the deck where it is to go and the teak is laid in place. I don't know how it is secured while waiting for the caulking/adhesive is setting, but once set, it won't move, for the life of the boat.
Adhesives haven't changed since your deck was laid. Only the techniques. Screws were used to hold the boards in place while the adhesive cured. That may have taken as much as few weeks. After that, the screws are unnecessary and can be removed and never replaced.

Between the boards is usually a channel with a depth of approximately 1/2 the original thickness of the boards. There may also be a "bond breaker" in that channel, which will need to be replaced if you pull out the old one. The purpose of the BB is so the teak can expand and contract seasonally, without tearing the seal of the caulking from the sides of the channel.

If you don't have any bond breaker, your original installation my have been different from the method counselled by Lifecaulk, when you buy your caulking from them, as I did.
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Old 06-15-2020, 10:49 PM   #14
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Everything is a learning process I might skip the caulk and just have teak. I don't think the admiral will like that though. I imagine I'll make a jig or guide for my router after all the holes are filled and it's glued down.

I think instead of a countersink I'll just drill out the holes for the bungs and take that same hole straight on into the fiberglass. Then pour in the epoxy and put in the bung.

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For at least the last 25 years, the laying of teak decks has been without any screws. The area to be laid is laid out on patterns on the shop floor and the caulking is put down between the boards. Once set up, a layer of similar caulking is troweled onto the deck where it is to go and the teak is laid in place. I don't know how it is secured while waiting for the caulking/adhesive is setting, but once set, it won't move, for the life of the boat.
Adhesives haven't changed since your deck was laid. Only the techniques. Screws were used to hold the boards in place while the adhesive cured. That may have taken as much as few weeks. After that, the screws are unnecessary and can be removed and never replaced.

Between the boards is usually a channel with a depth of approximately 1/2 the original thickness of the boards. There may also be a "bond breaker" in that channel, which will need to be replaced if you pull out the old one. The purpose of the BB is so the teak can expand and contract seasonally, without tearing the seal of the caulking from the sides of the channel.

If you don't have any bond breaker, your original installation my have been different from the method counselled by Lifecaulk, when you buy your caulking from them, as I did.
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Old 06-15-2020, 10:51 PM   #15
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@cigatoo

Any tips for me? I've got a few loose slats but for the most part the deck is down tight.


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Iíve been doing exactly that. Remove the bung and screw, drill down with 3/8th drill through top layer fiberglass, into the core, but not through the bottom layer of glass. Then fill with epoxy and pop in the bung. I cant speak for your boat but on the Grand Banks those decks are glued down real good. No screws needed.
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Old 06-16-2020, 05:35 AM   #16
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"Concerning the stiffness that the teak might be providing I am considering removing the teak and putting down an expensive layer of G 10 with epoxy and a traditional non-skid coating on top."


In most TT cases the teak overlay was an upsell for the boat dealer , a profit maker but not part of the hull scantlings.
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Old 06-16-2020, 10:08 AM   #17
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@cigatoo

Any tips for me? I've got a few loose slats but for the most part the deck is down tight.
Nothing else that I can think of. Bungs are 3/8. Drill using 3/8 drill, fill, and insert new bung.
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Old 06-16-2020, 10:10 AM   #18
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ďIn most TT cases the teak overlay was an upsell for the boat dealer , a profit maker but not part of the hull scantlings.Ē

Thatís a great observation. Never thought about that. I wonder how the GBís were shipped?
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Old 06-16-2020, 10:33 AM   #19
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Scantlings! I can't remember hearing that word before. Thanks![

QUOTE=FF;890059]"Concerning the stiffness that the teak might be providing I am considering removing the teak and putting down an expensive layer of G 10 with epoxy and a traditional non-skid coating on top."


In most TT cases the teak overlay was an upsell for the boat dealer , a profit maker but not part of the hull scantlings.[/QUOTE]
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Old 06-16-2020, 10:40 AM   #20
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Scantlings aside an older boat needs all the help she can get. The fiberglass under the teak is smooth so there had to be something else added. I'm not sure if any of them came without teak - at least none that I have seen. But either way retaining whatever help the teak offers seems like a good idea. Plus it looks good
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