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Old 09-18-2020, 03:09 PM   #1
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Teak deck leaking

I have a 1986 36' Albin Trawler. Apparently, I have a leaks coming through the deck into the anchor locker and another coming into the aft cabin. I don't know how to locate the leaks nor what to do about them. Any ideas? What's worked for you?
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Old 09-18-2020, 04:14 PM   #2
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I would check the caulking in between the teak deck boards. Also the screws that hold down the boards are a likely source. If it is coming out inside the coring is probably wet and that is the big problem. If it were my boat I would remove the teak decking and glass the deck and paint it. But before you do that you will probably have to address the core, if it is wet. That will involve removing the deck fiberglass and removing the wet core, replace the core and reinstall the fiberglass deck. It is a lot of hard work but it isn’t rocket science.
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Old 09-18-2020, 09:37 PM   #3
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As I recall these are not sandwich or cored decks under the teak overlay. I believe most of these boats are plywood decks sheathed with one layer of mat and polyester resin top and bottom. The teak decks are laid dry atop the decks with a rabbet joint seam detail. These plank seams are payed with a thiokol compound similar to BoatLife. Decks are usually roughly 3/4” thick, counterbored 5/16-3/8” and fastened with you name it then bunged.

Leaks on this type of construction are virtually impossible to locate and address. Normally by the time water ingress is noticed the leakage and water migration has been going on for some time. The sub deck is almost always five ply Lauan plywood that has very little resistance to inter-laminate bond failure and fungal decay. The screws used in the deck planks are almost always driven dry so water migration is a common problem. When the interior or deckhead surface is glassed, as are most, it’s difficult to track and ID leaks. A rather simple and less destructive method of confirmation is to take a 1/2” core sample from the outboard areas in the lazarette and other suspect but accessible areas. You only want to core deep enough to check the plywood and not into the teak. A moisture meter properly used will do pretty much the same but nothing is as convincing as a core.

Good luck
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Old 09-22-2020, 10:44 AM   #4
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Thanks for your response. I will be searching the screw holes and caulk between the boards. Hopefully, I find the source of the water. I dread the idea of ripping up the teak decks and/or the fiberglass deck.
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Old 09-22-2020, 05:29 PM   #5
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Phil,
Good luck and I hope you find out that it is not too bad in terms of damage, time, and cost. However, this is an example of why, as much as they look and feel great, so many of the forum members do not want to own screwed down teak decks. That statement is unfortunately too late to help you, but maybe some other prospective boat buyer can gain some info from it.

Albins are good boats, I wish you and your family much enjoyment.
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Old 09-26-2020, 03:34 PM   #6
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Leaky Decks

First to locate the leak get a hose and simulate rainfall above where it leaks into the boat, if there is a slope go to the high point as water takes the least path of resistance. Look for any loose calking or screws, that’s usually where the problem is.
The fix is to remove the calking between the deck boards and see if any of the boards lift slightly using a small screw driver. Get some epoxy and a syringe and squeeze the epoxy under the loose boards, place a weight on the area and be patient and let it dry at least 12 hours. When all the areas are solidly adhered tape the boards on either side of the removed calking and re-calk. Remember to remove your tape before the calking sets. This should re seal any loose decks or screws and the calking re seals between the planks.
Find some nice days and take your time, your effort and patience will be worth it.
Good luck
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Old 09-28-2020, 11:59 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by garbler View Post
As I recall these are not sandwich or cored decks under the teak overlay. I believe most of these boats are plywood decks sheathed with one layer of mat and polyester resin top and bottom. The teak decks are laid dry atop the decks with a rabbet joint seam detail. These plank seams are payed with a thiokol compound similar to BoatLife. Decks are usually roughly 3/4” thick, counterbored 5/16-3/8” and fastened with you name it then bunged.

Leaks on this type of construction are virtually impossible to locate and address. Normally by the time water ingress is noticed the leakage and water migration has been going on for some time. The sub deck is almost always five ply Lauan plywood that has very little resistance to inter-laminate bond failure and fungal decay. The screws used in the deck planks are almost always driven dry so water migration is a common problem. When the interior or deckhead surface is glassed, as are most, it’s difficult to track and ID leaks. A rather simple and less destructive method of confirmation is to take a 1/2” core sample from the outboard areas in the lazarette and other suspect but accessible areas. You only want to core deep enough to check the plywood and not into the teak. A moisture meter properly used will do pretty much the same but nothing is as convincing as a core.

Good luck
Thank you for your thorough reply. It looks like I have a lot of work ahead of me. Your advice will be really helpful in this endeavor.
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Old 09-28-2020, 12:02 PM   #8
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Leaking teak decks.

Thank you so much for your thorough reply. It looks like I have a lot of work ahead of me. Your advice will be very helpful.
I do love the boat, and for the most part I enjoy the challenges of trying to bring her back. I am learning every day.
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Old 09-28-2020, 12:33 PM   #9
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Check out a web site called Boat Works Today. He does a lot of fiberglass repairs. Also look at Marinehowto.com. He has a lot of DIY articles on that site.
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