Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 07-21-2021, 04:00 PM   #1
Senior Member
 
Montenido's Avatar
 
City: La Paz, BCS
Vessel Name: Ansedonia
Vessel Model: Californian/Carver 52CPMY
Join Date: Dec 2014
Posts: 344
Switch positions while anchored.

Hi folks,

I'm sure that this is a stupid question, but here goes anyway. When I reach an anchorage, once the anchor is properly set and the boat is squared away I turn off the ignition breakers, windlass and navigation instruments. If something happens in the middle of the night, I know that these 3 switches need to be turned on before the boat will start.

My question is: Will leaving these circuit breakers on cause any wear of electrical parts if the items are not turned on (motors, windlass, instruments)?

I'm pretty sure that it would be fine, but I wanted to see what you folks thought about this and what you actually do when anchored.

Thanks and cheers, Bill
__________________
"There is simply nothing more worth while than messing around in boats."
Montenido is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2021, 04:40 PM   #2
TF Site Team
 
Bacchus's Avatar
 
City: Seneca Lake NY
Vessel Name: Bacchus
Vessel Model: MS 34 HT Trawler
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 5,237
IMO it doesn't matter...
Follow the routine you are comfortable with and used to.
If items are powered down no need/ advantage to also turn off breakers... no power draw is no power draw.
I'm assuming you can turn everything you need on from the helm so make it as easy & simple as possible to fire up... just do it consistently so its second nature.
__________________
Don
2008 MS 34 HT Trawler
"Bacchus"
Bacchus is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2021, 04:57 PM   #3
TF Site Team
 
Insequent's Avatar
 
City: Brisbane
Vessel Name: Insequent
Vessel Model: Ocean Alexander 50 Mk I
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 3,283
I usually turn off the windlass breaker. I noticed that the up-down solenoid (a pretty old one) gets warm to the touch with the breaker on, so it must be consuming a bit of power. I don't know how much. Other breakers I leave on, although some items may also draw a little in standby mode.
__________________
Brian
Insequent is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2021, 05:04 PM   #4
Senior Member
 
City: Port Hope
Join Date: Oct 2019
Posts: 103
When I saw the title of this thread I assumed "switch" was a verb rather than a noun. Would have been a totally different string of responses.
John R M is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2021, 05:12 PM   #5
Guru
 
AlaskaProf's Avatar
 
City: Tacoma, WA & Ashland, OR
Vessel Name: SEEADLER
Vessel Model: RAWSON 41
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 1,546
Some may recall my $500 jump start from Boat US last year. Okay, I've already admitted the batteries were old and I got what I deserved, but after replacing all 8 GC bats, I was still puzzled that both old banks died overnight, when the "start" bank was switched off as soon as we anchored.

I now believe that the inverter was installed to draw from both banks irrespective of the position of the two rotary switches. "Inverter - OFF" is now on my shutdown list.

(Also bought one of those nifty jumper packs, just like boat US.)

Brian, good hint about Windlass breaker. Just turned mine off.
AlaskaProf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2021, 07:33 PM   #6
Guru
 
OldDan1943's Avatar
 
City: Aventura FL
Vessel Name: Kinja
Vessel Model: American Tug 34 #116
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 8,032
You should be able to shut down pretty much everything except the fridge, bilge pumps and remembering to turn on the anchor light.
__________________
The meek will inherit the earth but, the brave will inherit the seas.
OldDan1943 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2021, 07:45 PM   #7
Master and Commander
 
markpierce's Avatar
 
City: Vallejo CA
Vessel Name: Carquinez Coot
Vessel Model: penultimate Seahorse Marine Coot hull #6
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 12,305
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldDan1943 View Post
You should be able to shut down pretty much everything except the fridge, bilge pumps and remembering to turn the anchor light on.
You might want to subtly light an unoccupied an interior portion of the boat so there is an eye-level light at night to help others avoid possible collision. Especially important for me since the anchor light is 30 feet above waterline.
__________________
Kar-KEEN-ez Koot
markpierce is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2021, 08:01 PM   #8
Guru
 
OldDan1943's Avatar
 
City: Aventura FL
Vessel Name: Kinja
Vessel Model: American Tug 34 #116
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 8,032
Quote:
Originally Posted by markpierce View Post
You might want to subtly light an unoccupied an interior portion of the boat so there is an eye-level light at night to help others avoid possible collision. Especially important for me since the anchor light is 30 feet above waterline.
Seems reasonable.
I have an upper deck cluster of while LEDs I could turn on.
__________________
The meek will inherit the earth but, the brave will inherit the seas.
OldDan1943 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2021, 08:59 PM   #9
Guru
 
rgano's Avatar
 
City: Southport, FL near Panama City
Vessel Name: FROLIC
Vessel Model: Mainship 30 Pilot II since 2015. GB-42 1986-2015. Former Unlimited Tonnage Master
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,440
I was anchored out in the Coronado Islands off San Diego after a rather bouncy passage when I awoke to the sound of my anchor windlass (only one way) reeling in the chain. The foot switch at the windlass had shorted after suffering seawater ingress through a slow deck leak. So, sure, switch off the windlass breaker for sure.
__________________
Rich Gano
FROLIC (2005 MainShip 30 Pilot II)
Panama City area
rgano is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2021, 09:20 PM   #10
Guru
 
Jeff F's Avatar
 
City: Great Lakes
Vessel Name: Escapade
Vessel Model: 50` US Navy Utility trawler conversion
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 1,140
Quote:
Originally Posted by rgano View Post
I was anchored out in the Coronado Islands off San Diego after a rather bouncy passage when I awoke to the sound of my anchor windlass (only one way) reeling in the chain. The foot switch at the windlass had shorted after suffering seawater ingress through a slow deck leak. So, sure, switch off the windlass breaker for sure.
Hmm. Never considered that. I have a dedicated battery pack in the bow supplying the thruster and windlass. Disconnects and fuses are buried up there, so they're always powered up.

It's not just at anchor that this event is potentially dangerous. I'm not sure what would happen if my windlass came on with the anchor in the roller. It might not be pretty...
Jeff F is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-21-2021, 10:09 PM   #11
Guru
 
AlaskaProf's Avatar
 
City: Tacoma, WA & Ashland, OR
Vessel Name: SEEADLER
Vessel Model: RAWSON 41
Join Date: Jun 2016
Posts: 1,546
Quote:
Originally Posted by rgano View Post
I was anchored out in the Coronado Islands off San Diego after a rather bouncy passage when I awoke to the sound of my anchor windlass (only one way) reeling in the chain. The foot switch at the windlass had shorted after suffering seawater ingress through a slow deck leak. So, sure, switch off the windlass breaker for sure.
I had rainwater short one of my deck switches while I was at home, 450 miles away. Fortunately, I never leave the chain on the gypsy; not sure how many months the motor ran before giving up

And, yes, I had left the breaker on. Expensive lesson.
AlaskaProf is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2021, 05:39 AM   #12
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 21,972
A great rainy day adventure might be to shut the boat down to your normal not in use switch positions and either feel , or use a temp gun to see if anything is warm.

If its warm its using power , and running the batts down. Time to fix it.
FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2021, 07:25 AM   #13
Guru
 
jleonard's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 4,270
Quote:
Originally Posted by rgano View Post
I was anchored out in the Coronado Islands off San Diego after a rather bouncy passage when I awoke to the sound of my anchor windlass (only one way) reeling in the chain. The foot switch at the windlass had shorted after suffering seawater ingress through a slow deck leak. So, sure, switch off the windlass breaker for sure.
I was just going to make a similar post. This happened to a friend at my marina except it sent the chain and anchor out while he was tied in his slip.
Not an uncommon thing I am thinking.
__________________
Jay Leonard

New Port Richey,Fl
jleonard is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2021, 10:07 AM   #14
Guru
 
firehoser75's Avatar
 
City: Nanaimo
Vessel Name: former owner of "Pilitak"
Vessel Model: Nordic Tug 37
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 1,443
I agree with the advice of "get a routine" and follow it every time. In that way, you are less likely to forget something important in the middle of the night. We did drag anchor once (of course at 3AM after already being set for 2 complete tide changes), and being a bit groggy at that time of the AM, the routine probably saved my bacon (at least in some way).
At night, I always turned off all DC breakers that were not absolutely essential. Left on breakers for the lights, anchor light, fridge and freezer, and AIS (which was also our "anchor watch"). Even turned off the engine start battery main switch, which was located just below the DC panel. Our DC panel was just outside the head, and you had to pass it to get to the pilothouse (so it was convenient). Did the same thing when leaving the boat at anchor (dinghy).

Many ways to do this, but best to always do the same way. Form a habit.
__________________
Tom
Nanaimo, BC
firehoser75 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-22-2021, 10:23 AM   #15
Guru
 
OldDan1943's Avatar
 
City: Aventura FL
Vessel Name: Kinja
Vessel Model: American Tug 34 #116
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 8,032
Make a physical list for "Shut down" and "Start up"
__________________
The meek will inherit the earth but, the brave will inherit the seas.
OldDan1943 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2021, 01:23 PM   #16
Member
 
Senojev's Avatar
 
City: Portage
Vessel Name: Sir Tugley Blue
Vessel Model: 2010 Nordic Tug - 2010
Join Date: Sep 2017
Posts: 24
Breakers off/on

Our DC panel has 50 Blueseas breakers, with 10 always on. These are for essential circuits such as bilge pumps, detectors, alarms, freezer, etc and have breaker covers to prevent inadvertently switching them off. We have color coded each of the other breaker handles RED to indicate those to be powered on when running,and YELLOW for those powered on at anchor. A few are not color coded and use is discretionary.

The color coding make it simple to just run down the panel in a few seconds and not have to read labels. Steve D gave this out as a tip at a Trawlerfest.

Our windlass breaker is only on when needed.
Senojev is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2021, 01:30 PM   #17
Guru
 
City: North Charleston, SC
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 4,446
Generally speaking, you only need to turn off a device at one place. A motor, for example will not run if the power is disconnected. Nothing is gained by turning off multiple switches.

Some modern electronic devices consume a very small amount of power when in the "off" position because their switches are electronic, not mechanical and they need power before they can be turned on.

Personally, I don't turn off any breakers when I anchor or sleep. I don't see any advantage and it only contributes to wear of the breakers.

And when it's time to get underway the next day, the job is simpler because everything only needs to be turned on in one place.
rwidman is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2021, 01:31 PM   #18
Veteran Member
 
BobMc's Avatar
 
Vessel Name: Sanderling
Vessel Model: DeFever 41
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by OldDan1943 View Post
You should be able to shut down pretty much everything except the fridge, bilge pumps and remembering to turn on the anchor light.
To make life simpler, use an anchor light bulb with a photo cell which will turn it on at dusk and off at dawn, such as https://store.marinebeam.com/dusk-to...or-light-bulb/

There are several other options, including a light activated switch you can put in the anchor light circuit. Google is your friend.
__________________
Bob McLeran and Judy Young Manatee Cove Marina
MV Sanderling Patrick Air Force Base
DeFever 41 Trawler has been sold Melbourne, Florida
Blog: https://mvsanderling.net/Blog
BobMc is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2021, 02:41 PM   #19
Guru
 
dhays's Avatar
 
City: Gig Harbor
Vessel Name: Kinship
Vessel Model: North Pacific 43
Join Date: May 2015
Posts: 8,826
I think many times our routines are influenced by how our boats were setup when we bought them.


In my pilothouse, I have a breaker panel overhead. There is a master DC breaker then breakers for engine, bow thruster, stern thruster, trim tabs, VHF, depth sounder, nav instruments, and autopilot. Maybe something else I can't think of at the moment, after I am secured at the dock or at anchor generally all of those except the Master gets flipped off. The Master has a cover so it cannot be inadvertently turned off. Sure there are times when I might want the VHF left on or the depth sounder, but otherwise they all get turned off.


On a separate DC panel, are a whole bunch of breakers that control a variety of circuits. There are only a few that are left on most of the time. Saloon lights, electric head, shower sump (only because I have my holding tank aerator wired into the same circuit, and refrigerator . Those all have covers over them as well.


At anchor, the fresh water pump is left on as well as other cabin lights. At night the anchor light breaker is turned on and usually left on until I remember to turn it off around noon the next day. Everything else such as windlass, washdown pump, deck crane, ER lights, etc... is left off until they are needed. I'd just as soon not power things that I'm not going to need at the time.


I used to keep my inverter on as well, until I had the experience of a power outage at the dock that caused my house bank to get discharged to 50%. Now I only turn on the inverter when it is needed for AC power requirements.
__________________
Regards,

Dave
SPOT page
dhays is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-26-2021, 05:12 PM   #20
Senior Member
 
City: Hawaii
Join Date: Jul 2018
Posts: 218
You must show an anchor light from the beginning to the end of the time of the Civil Twilight except in a "designated anchorage". You can find Civil Twilight info in the Nautical Almanac. You can find designated anchorages on chart or the Coast Pilot or similar pubs.
While not presently required by USCG regs, it is under discussion to require an anchor light at all times. On a dark and stormy nights the low power of an anchor light is pretty worthless. You are just plain stupid if you don't do this anyway plus leave on spreader, deck and/or cabin lights to be seen and avoided.
As for turning off CB's to anything especially when someone is on board, WTF, if your battery is on to power an anchor light anyway, why don't you want short-circuit protection if frayed and/or wet wires and connections come in contact with each other?
ProMaritime is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Trawler Port Captains
Port Captains are TF volunteers who can serve as local guides or assist with local arrangements and information. Search below to locate Port Captains near your destination. To learn more about this program read here: TF Port Captain Program





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:29 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012