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Old 05-23-2022, 12:26 PM   #1
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Suggestions for pulling anchor without windlass?

What are different options for pulling the anchor without a windlass if needed?

I've seen the anchor ball where you kind of drive around in a big circle, would that work on a slow boat? Right now I've got 1" anchor line with about 15' 3/8 chain set up to drop if needed.

Still trying to find a dock space for this Friday on the mid to upper Hudson river when we make our way North to the Champlain canal.

Thanks.
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Old 05-23-2022, 12:29 PM   #2
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Really strong arms??? Maybe invite Arnold along. Sorry I have no experience with the anchor and ball retrieving system.
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Old 05-23-2022, 12:35 PM   #3
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Generally you'd pull by hand until the rode is vertical, then cleat it off. Either drive forward over the anchor a bit or back down on it a few times until it breaks free. Then you'll be able to pull it up the rest of the way.
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Old 05-23-2022, 12:54 PM   #4
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If heavy, grab the rode and walk aft rather than using your arms and back.
once vertical and tight, I always first use reverse to try to break it free. That usually does the trick. If not then I'll go forward on it.
15 feet of chain and the anchor should not be too difficult to haul up.
1 inch anchor line is a little overkill IMO. 5/8 or 3/4 would be easier to manage.
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Old 05-23-2022, 01:17 PM   #5
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I see no reason you could not pull the anchor with a ball. I see 30-40 foot boats doing it in this area. You are going to need a pretty good size ball to float everything.
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Old 05-23-2022, 01:49 PM   #6
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If heavy, grab the rode and walk aft rather than using your arms and back.
once vertical and tight, I always first use reverse to try to break it free. That usually does the trick. If not then I'll go forward on it.
15 feet of chain and the anchor should not be too difficult to haul up.
1 inch anchor line is a little overkill IMO. 5/8 or 3/4 would be easier to manage.
I agree, thatís what came on the boat when we purchased it. The line has a thimble on it and a shackle attaching it to the chain. I had a heck of a time getting it through the deck fitting from the chain locker. I have the chain and shackle on deck for now with just the line going into the locker so itís not hassle when I need to drop it.
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Old 05-23-2022, 01:56 PM   #7
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If you have a deckhand, have them ready to uncleat the rode and take it in as you motor up over the hook. Once the rode is vertical, cleat it off again and then coast forward or, if necessary, power forward enough to break the hook loose. Once it's free, stop the boat, go up to the bow yourself and help your deckhand finish hoisting the rode, chain and hook up onto the pulpit or roller.

This can all be done singlehanded too, just a bit more slowly. Use your legs as well as arms and back muscles, and be ready to cleat it off for a minute or so, if you need to recover.

Jay is right that a 1" rode is overdoing things - I would feel very secure with 5/8", and that is a more manageable size for gripping, heaving, coiling and storing.
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Old 05-23-2022, 02:14 PM   #8
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Splice the new smaller line to the chain so it will fit through easier.
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Old 05-23-2022, 02:27 PM   #9
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If you are talking about breaking it loose then +1 on prior posts saying taking in slack so in essence you are at a 1:1 scope or rode is straight down from the boat then using the boat to break it loose. I like to just pull forward a bit since the boat is already going that direction from pulling in the rode.

I am guessing your anchor and chain probably have a combined weight around 40-50 pounds. If pulling that much weight is not favorable to your back, arms and/or hands then one option could be a Z-Pulley system that runs back to a mid-ship cleat. Here is an example from the mountain climbing world
https://www.alpin-ism.com/knowledge-...owledge-part-2

and an example from the ATV world
Free An ATV With The ‚ÄúZ‚ÄĚ : The Maine

They look a little fiddly but once you practice a few times you can set them up quickly. A windlass is the better solution but if you need something this could work.
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Old 05-23-2022, 02:49 PM   #10
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Splice the new smaller line to the chain so it will fit through easier.
Agree with Dave. Chain splice w 3 strand not too difficult. Give it a try snd if you dont like the looks cut it off and repeat.
The second attemp is almost always much neater.
Lots of online video help.
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Old 05-23-2022, 03:07 PM   #11
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New anchor line spliced directly to chain is definitely on my to do list. Once we get to our summer slip I can start working down that list.
We bought this bought to learn with and we are learning a lot. Definitely next boat we will try to find a more active cruising boat rather than one that was mostly marina bound before purchasing.
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Old 05-23-2022, 04:06 PM   #12
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Use the handle that came with the windlass and go manual.

No way we are pulling our anchor by hand.
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Old 05-23-2022, 04:11 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by RedRascal View Post
.

I am guessing your anchor and chain probably have a combined weight around 40-50 pounds.
Put an extra zero on it for us
Anchor is 150lb
Chain is 3lb/ft
First mark is 150ft and usual snubber point
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Old 05-23-2022, 04:11 PM   #14
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Use the handle that came with the windlass and go manual.

No way we are pulling our anchor by hand.
I have no windlass installed yet. I am currently shopping for one though.
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Old 05-23-2022, 04:32 PM   #15
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I have 150 of 3/8" chain and a 66# Bruce. I don't think I'll be pulling that up by hand. One of the things I stole off my old sailboat when I sold it was a 4 part block and tackle (boom vang if you're familiar). I put a chain hook on it so I can pull the chain back to a midship or aft cleat if I have to. Kind of like how we did it before I put a windlass on the sailboat, I ran the anchor line back to a cockpit winch and cranked it up with that. Chain was cut to make it almost to the winch so I only had to winch the nylon line.
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Old 05-23-2022, 04:38 PM   #16
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I have no windlass installed yet. I am currently shopping for one though.
Well there's something to add on the section criteria
Manual backup and an above deck installation

Something like the Maxwell HWC 2500 or Muir cougar would be a good choice if you are being serious.
And upgrade the chain , shackles and anchor while at it.

Overkill, possibly but no one complained about too much windlass, chain or anchor when it all turns to custard @ 2am.
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Old 05-23-2022, 04:52 PM   #17
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Absolutely Simi,
If I really wanted to go all out I'd build up my fore deck and mount a heavy duty hydraulic unit. But knowing we plan to sell at some point I don't want to have 10% of my boat value tied up in the electric windlass yet.
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Old 05-23-2022, 05:58 PM   #18
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We carry a block and tackle as part of our safety equipment. Bride is small (4’10”) and 1/2 my weight. Should windlass fail would use boat to get to up and down. Then use two dock lines. Attach block/tackle to one and to chain just aft the roller. Use it to pull in 4-5’ of chain. Secure it using the other dock line. Repeat until just dealing with short length of chain and anchor. Now down to 50-75lbs which can be manhandled.

Btw- our windlass allows insertion of a long handle and sufficient mechanical advantage above only necessary if windlass is frozen
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Old 05-23-2022, 06:29 PM   #19
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I actually removed chain as a precaution. I could not lift 30’ of chain plus a 33lb anchor. I am not strong enough and only travel with Mrs. I went to 15’ and I can handle it if I have capstan failure
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Old 05-23-2022, 06:53 PM   #20
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You guys are making me cry thinking about this scenario! I have 400í of 3/8Ē (10mm) and a 100lb anchor. If my windlass fails, itís getting a buoy on it and Iím letting it sink for later recovery.

Unless there is a genius idea out there?
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