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Old 04-21-2019, 07:38 AM   #21
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The directions I posted are not MY directions...I found them years ago and saved them. Please note this in the first paragraph: "The following recommendations conform to section 10.8 in the A-1 192 code covering electrical, plumbing, and heating of recreational vehicles. The solution is approved and recommended by competent health officials. It may be used in a new system, a used one that has not been used for a period of time, or one that may have been contaminated."


That doesn't seem to leave a lot of room to argue the concentration. But it's YOUR boat and there's no rule requiring you to follow those directions.


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Old 04-21-2019, 09:01 AM   #22
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The directions I posted are not MY directions...
That doesn't seem to leave a lot of room to argue the concentration. But it's YOUR boat and there's no rule requiring you to follow those directions.
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No argument intended - at least from my perspective - unless you contend that the contact time is unrelated to the concentration used?

My feeling is that RVIA is an industry related standard and manufacturers would naturally be concerned with the time required. A procedure that would take 24 hrs would not be as manufacturing friendly as one being completed in 3 hrs. Many of us fill one day and dump the next day so 12 - 24 hr contact time is very reasonable.

There are many papers with recommended concentrations between 50 PPM and 200 PPM and different contact times ranging from 2 to 24 hrs. In fact the the food / restaurant industry standards cite higher concentrations for surface sanitizing that are effective with 3-5 min contact time.

As always - thanks for your knowledge & contributions
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Old 04-25-2019, 06:56 AM   #23
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Formula from Shurflo

Found tank sanitation instructions in a Shurflo water pump owners manual. From the manual:
>2 oz of bleach per 15 gallons of capacity (1 cup per 60 gallons)
>Flush through all faucets, leave pump on and let rest 4 hours. Double the solution concentration for a one hour contact time.
>Drain and refill a time or two to reduce odor. Residual chlorine odor is not harmful.

Hopefully this is a "credible" source
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Old 04-25-2019, 01:52 PM   #24
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It may be used in a new system, a used one that has not been used for a period of time, or one that may have been contaminated."
I suspect the high concentrations in this formula are to deal with the possibility of a contaminated system. If your system has NOT been contaminated, then the lower concentrations would be completely adequate. All of the sources that I've read -- that get into the details of the proper PPM for different purposes -- specify higher concentrations for known contamination, and lower concentrations to sanitize questionable, but reasonably clean, sources.


Nit-picking, but I would also point out that we are talking about "sanitizing" a system, not "sterilizing" it. Your water system does not need to be sterile, and true sterilization goes WAAAY beyond the kind of sanitization that we're talking about.
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Old 04-26-2019, 07:23 AM   #25
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Any help/harm to running the solution through a fresh water head when sanitizing? Flush a couple of times to get it into the system to clean. Or is this a waste (sorry) that will just mess up the good things the aerobic bacteria have going on in my holding tank by dumping chlorine on them?

Never can say "aerobic bacteria" without getting a strange mental picture of them all down there on floor mats in little bacteria workout suits, jumping up and down, pumping their little bacteria arms to get their heart rate up....
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Old 04-26-2019, 08:54 AM   #26
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Pretty obvious - bleach is the key to keeping fresh water tanks and plumbing lines clean.

I've been boating for over 60 years. From 5th grade onward I took on [was promoted to - lol] the task of being "water-boy" aboard dad's boats.

Dad taught me well in regard to how, when, why and in what amount to add bleach to fresh water tank. Has worked well for me ever since... btw... I'm still "water-boy" and very proud of it!

There have been many mentions of bleach proportions, hours to let set, how many times to full flush, how often to add bleach and flush... etc. So I won't bother to add my 2 cents on detail instruction. All I can say is of the posts I read most are completely in the ball park on keeping fresh water fresh aboard boat.

Would like to add this comment: IMO... A little [not too much] extra bleach is a lot better than any amount of extra contaminents/buggs in your water system.

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Old 04-26-2019, 02:00 PM   #27
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Let me take this one step further. Obviously, if a boat is wintered over up north, the water must be drained. But if the boat is idle for 6 months in a tropical climate (no freezing) is it better to leave the tanks and water system full (no air, everything is in water, and no bugs can grow unless it's moist, but not underwater)? We've been leaving our fuel and water systems full for the last 10 years, but....inquiring minds want to know!
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Old 04-26-2019, 02:36 PM   #28
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We have lived aboard for 10 years. Our tanks are SS. We get water from dozens of places each year from Canada to the keys. We have never yet found a need to sterilize our water system. The water is usually from municipal sources which has chlorine in it. We do have a carbon filter just after the water pump.
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Old 04-26-2019, 04:01 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by denverd0n View Post
Nit-picking, but I would also point out that we are talking about "sanitizing" a system, not "sterilizing" it. Your water system does not need to be sterile, and true sterilization goes WAAAY beyond the kind of sanitization that we're talking about.
Correct, I should have entitled thread "sanitizing". Just an annual "clean up" to be sure we are safe as we live aboard and cycle the water every 10 days to 2 weeks. We don't buy bottled water and lug it to the boat, the fresh water system and a Brita serve us well.
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Old 04-26-2019, 06:26 PM   #30
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We use UV light to sterilize our water as it goes into the tank.
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Old 04-27-2019, 01:45 PM   #31
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There once was a recipe on the Clorox bottle for treating drinking water but the FDA made them take it off. The bottle also had a recipe for treating poison oak and poison ivy but it went the same way.

The recipes can be easily found on the internet the last time I checked.
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Old 04-27-2019, 02:02 PM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tadhana View Post
We have lived aboard for 10 years. Our tanks are SS. We get water from dozens of places each year from Canada to the keys. We have never yet found a need to sterilize our water system. The water is usually from municipal sources which has chlorine in it. We do have a carbon filter just after the water pump.
Similar for us.
3 years aboard with plastic tanks (400 gallon x 2)
Multiple sources including rain.
Only filter is the s/s mesh before pump.
No sterilise or flush and no problems.
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