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Old 10-06-2021, 09:46 PM   #1
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Solo and Parkinson

I just got diagnosed with Parkinson D. I was planning on solo circumnavigate for about 5 years on a sailboat (Amel 53). I have to shrink my dreams and I am thinking about buying a GB 42 and do the East Coast for 2-3 years (if possible). I know nothing about Trawlers but the GB 42 is very appealing to me. My budget was $200k to buy $50k to spent while I own the boat and sell it for $135K in 3 years. I would love to have your opinions on what I need to look for as far as engines (to have a cruising speed of 10 knots), year, add-ons such as water maker, A/C etc. What I need to verify before I buy the boat and if my budget is OK.
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Old 10-06-2021, 10:41 PM   #2
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Originally Posted by cdepret57 View Post
I just got diagnosed with Parkinson D. I was planning on solo circumnavigate for about 5 years on a sailboat (Amel 53). I have to shrink my dreams and I am thinking about buying a GB 42 and do the East Coast for 2-3 years (if possible). I know nothing about Trawlers but the GB 42 is very appealing to me. My budget was $200k to buy $50k to spent while I own the boat and sell it for $135K in 3 years. I would love to have your opinions on what I need to look for as far as engines (to have a cruising speed of 10 knots), year, add-ons such as water maker, A/C etc. What I need to verify before I buy the boat and if my budget is OK.
Sorry to hear of your diagnosis - the GB42 is to me the classic trawler. I'm not an expert in them, but have a few general pointers from my experience with our CHB41, which is pretty similar in a lot of ways.

1. The boat market is really tough right now, so I wouldn't limit yourself to a single make/model. There are a lot of functionally very similar boats in the 40-43' size range, and you should be able to get a good one for your budget.

2. 10 knots is a terrible cruising speed for a 42' boat. You'll find 8kts to be vastly more efficient. My boat gets about 2nmpg at 8kts. 10kts is flat out with 240hp, and probably 3-4x the fuel burn. "Fast" boats will want to get up on a plane, which is usually more like 17-20kts+, and will require much more hp (700hp maybe?), probably under 1nmpg. If I had my druthers I'd have a single screw, and get 4nmpg cruising at 7.5kts, but that's harder to find.

3. The add-ons are a lesser concern than the overall quality and condition of the vessel. A watermaker can be had for a couple grand; not sure about A/C but also probably can be added, same with electronics, etc. This stuff can all add up quickly, so it's great to find a boat that has some or most of what you want, but in this market if you find a good boat at a good price you should grab it regardless I think.

Hope that helps a bit!
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Old 10-06-2021, 10:57 PM   #3
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I don't have have any useful purchasing advice but I can recommend the Rock Steady boxing program. My wife worked with a local affiliate here for a while before Covid and the participants really positive results. I have no financial interest in any way but honestly think it helped people with parkinson's, best of luck.
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Old 10-06-2021, 11:21 PM   #4
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Old 10-07-2021, 06:33 AM   #5
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Three concerns.
Fall risk. Fenestrating and propulsive gait of PD increases fall risk significantly. Don’t know how severe your PD is but would choose boat where fall risk was minimized to degree possible.
Unfortunately many people evolve into diffuse Lewy Body. This effects cognition and speed of thinking. Would maintain close surveillance by a third party (movement dysorder neurologist) of your cognitive processing. Would not single hand due to both physical and potential cognitive issues.
The 3 cps resting tremor can make touch screen operation difficult. Fortunately usually not when aiming but rather inevertant movements. Some people do better with hybrid controls.
Experiment with electronics to see how you do best.
Fortunately, with careful titration of medications and thoughtful care by a good neurologist folks remain very functional for a long time. Enjoy your boating and have too much fun.
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Old 10-07-2021, 06:51 AM   #6
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Is there a reason for a 42’ ? For soloing, if it were me, I’d be looking at a smaller boat. Maybe also, a Nordic Tug or American Tug in the low thirty foot range. $50K for what? Upgrades, repairs, etc? Might be ok if engine(s) and expensive boat parts are ok and/or refitted. A smaller, single screw boat with less wood should be cheaper and less time consuming to maintain.

On the east coast, you really do not need a watermaker. You’ll likely be stopping in marinas often enough to visit the town, do laundry, get fuel, etc. that filling up water will not be an issue. Watermakers are needy, requiring lots of attention, want to constantly get expensive presents in the form of filters and parts and resent if you show any interest in other parts of the boat.

Reverse cycle A/C will be somewhere between nice to have and a necessity depending where you are at a given time of the year. Whether reverse cycle, a diesel hydronic system or an electric blanket, you’ll likely want heat at some point. If you wish to anchor out a lot and for several days at a time, a generator would be quite useful, especially if you want A/C at anchor. If no A/C I’d consider solar and lithium battery bank.

How the boat should be equipped will depend how you intend to use it. Marina every night or mostly anchor? Spending more time in cooler or warmer climes? Do you enjoy sanding and varnishing or spending the afternoon watching a heron stalk along the shoreline?
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Old 10-07-2021, 07:12 AM   #7
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Couple of years ago I transitioned from a GB36 to a Back Cove 32. The 32 is probably too small for a full time live aboard but one of the reasons for the change was the flybridge. As I and my guests have gotten older, the steps up to the flybridge have seemed more perilous. In my opinion, balance problems would direct one to a boat on a single level that can be enjoyably handled from inside.
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Old 10-07-2021, 03:14 PM   #8
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Many thanks. Balance and tremor are not an issue for now. A trawler is running more flat and are better secured in case this would happen. Boxing is now part of my life as well as seeing multiples Drs. 7.5 to 8 knots as a cruising speed... Are you talking about Ford Lehman for a total (2 engines) of 250HP or so as opposed as Cat or Cummins? Thanks again,
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Old 10-07-2021, 04:34 PM   #9
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Many thanks. Balance and tremor are not an issue for now. A trawler is running more flat and are better secured in case this would happen. Boxing is now part of my life as well as seeing multiples Drs. 7.5 to 8 knots as a cruising speed... Are you talking about Ford Lehman for a total (2 engines) of 250HP or so as opposed as Cat or Cummins? Thanks again,
I have two very simple naturally aspirated Lehman 120's for a toal of 240hp. To get up on a plane you'll need much bigger engines. Cat and Cummins come in lots of different sizes (not an expert). GB42s are really not designed to go fast, though the newer ones can get up on a plane at the cost of massive quantities of fuel.

Given that you're solo & won't need lots of bedrooms like we do, I like the idea of a Europa style vessel, or something without a flybridge - you'll have plenty of space on the aft deck and it'll be easier to move around, handle lines, etc.

You might also think of something a bit smaller & faster if you want to spend more time at anchor and less on passage and you're not going really long distances. I know if I didn't need so many cabins I'd be thinking along those lines, possibly even outboard powered.
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Old 10-07-2021, 05:03 PM   #10
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cdepret, welcome.


My current boat was sold by the prior owner due to Parkinson's. Walking down the dock with him as we went to look at the boat was frightening due to his balance issues. As Hippo said, have folks keep an honest eye on you and be ready to make changes as needed. BTW, Hippo is a professional in this area so trust his thoughts more than the rest of us.


I'm a former sailor who moved to a trawler. To be honest, I think in any kind of choppy seas, a sailboat is much easier to stay on your feet than in a trawler. A sailboat has a more predictable motion and the hull shape and sail dampen it quite a bit. So don't count on a powerboat to provide a steady, level surface. Even in protected inland waterways, boat wakes can be very significant.


Having said all that, don't be afraid to give it a try. Before buying, you may want to try chartering a few times. My own experience with family and friends with Parkinson's is that the course of the disease is highly variable. Be bold, be wise, and be flexible in your plans.
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Old 10-22-2021, 12:59 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by socalrider View Post
Sorry to hear of your diagnosis - the GB42 is to me the classic trawler. I'm not an expert in them, but have a few general pointers from my experience with our CHB41, which is pretty similar in a lot of ways.

1. The boat market is really tough right now, so I wouldn't limit yourself to a single make/model. There are a lot of functionally very similar boats in the 40-43' size range, and you should be able to get a good one for your budget.

2. 10 knots is a terrible cruising speed for a 42' boat. You'll find 8kts to be vastly more efficient. My boat gets about 2nmpg at 8kts. 10kts is flat out with 240hp, and probably 3-4x the fuel burn. "Fast" boats will want to get up on a plane, which is usually more like 17-20kts+, and will require much more hp (700hp maybe?), probably under 1nmpg. If I had my druthers I'd have a single screw, and get 4nmpg cruising at 7.5kts, but that's harder to find.

3. The add-ons are a lesser concern than the overall quality and condition of the vessel. A watermaker can be had for a couple grand; not sure about A/C but also probably can be added, same with electronics, etc. This stuff can all add up quickly, so it's great to find a boat that has some or most of what you want, but in this market if you find a good boat at a good price you should grab it regardless I think.

Hope that helps a bit!
Good points, all!

Having spent 2.9 decades with a GB42, I might qualify as knowledgeable. The GB will NOT cruise at 10 knots unless you have the big engines they put in them later on. I routinely did 8.5 Knots with my twin Lehman 120s. Great engines for that boat. Onan generator? Love/hate relationship. Get something better.

And welcome aboard. Hopefully we will hear all about your successes!
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Old 10-22-2021, 01:27 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cdepret57 View Post
I just got diagnosed with Parkinson D. I was planning on solo circumnavigate for about 5 years on a sailboat (Amel 53). I have to shrink my dreams and I am thinking about buying a GB 42 and do the East Coast for 2-3 years (if possible). I know nothing about Trawlers but the GB 42 is very appealing to me. My budget was $200k to buy $50k to spent while I own the boat and sell it for $135K in 3 years. I would love to have your opinions on what I need to look for as far as engines (to have a cruising speed of 10 knots), year, add-ons such as water maker, A/C etc. What I need to verify before I buy the boat and if my budget is OK.
There was and likely still is a marina in Sarasota, FL that has a pretty good size rental fleet that includes several GB 42s if you've never run one. If you haven't I'd say good idea to do that first. I did it in 2013 before buying mine. Did a 3-day cruise in SW FL to some of the barrier islands. Useppa Island, only accessible by boat was our fave. In my case it was critical that my wife like the boat as well. After 3 days, she gave the thumbs up.
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Old 10-22-2021, 10:19 PM   #13
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Choice of Cruising Trawler

I am truly sorry to hear about your diagnosis.
I own a Grand Bank 42 Classic and hope these few comments will assist.
1. It has 2 X 240HP Cummins turbo-charged engines - extremely quiet, plenty of room in engine room for servicing, very economical cruising at 8.0 - 9.5 knots @ 1500 RPM, with fuel and water tanks full and clean hull - no stress on any part of machinery or vessel. Raymarine autopilot handles the boat beautifully at this cruising speed even in following or quartering seas.
2. An 8KW Onan genset delivers all the AC power I need, including convection/microwave oven, coffee maker, electric kettle, 3000W inverter etc. If you have a choice of genset you might consider a Fisher Panda - super quiet as it comes in its own sound-proof cover and excellent engineering.
3. A modest output water maker (60 litres/hour) more than tops up daily usage; I run it for about 45 mins when charging batteries each am and pm.
4. I will be 80 next birthday, sail single handed, fortunately still able to "run around" the boat. As a precaution, I fitted additional teak handles at the companionways/stairs to both forward and aft cabins - useful when boat is underway.
5. I note a few members suggested you consider the GB 42 Europa model as an alternate to the Classic. No steps internally. The master cabin is in the bow and is subject to wave slap/slosh noises at anchor - if this is an issue it is not inexpensive to address. In contrast, the aft cabin in the Classic is a joy to use, much more spacious, totally private and the island queen size berth guarantees excellent sleeping conditions, has separate head and shower facilities.
6. Your budget will likely lead you to GBs that are at least 20 years old. This is fine, but ensure you have any purchase subject to haul out inspection and full survey report from an independent, qualified marine surveyor.
7. Your choice of yacht, an Amel 53 indicates you would have no problems in storing a suitable tender when at sea/underway. Have you thought of how you will deploy/recover and store a tender on a GB 42 Classic? I ceased using the boom because I sail off the west coast of Australia where we experience winds of 20 - 25 knots most afternoons.
If you progress your search for a GB42 Classic I am happy to provide additional information and I can be contacted on denis@denisglennon.com.
Best wishes on both the health and boat fronts.
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Old 10-23-2021, 05:40 AM   #14
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Given the potential issues with PD would look at single level boats. Wouldn’t be as concerned about FD, SD or planing but rather number of steps, hand holds, absence of wide open spaces. One of the issues commonly seen with PD is the propulsive gait. This is due to your brain misinterpreting where it thinks your center of balance is. So you develop a tendency to lean forward and shuffle in an attempt to maintain balance. Dynamic balance when standing still is also effected. Overtime most sailors without thought develop a complex strategy to maintain balance using torso, hips, knees and ankles. A normal primate brain will do everything possible to keep both eyes level which allows focused biocular vision. On land it’s seen as a sailors swagger. For PD due to bradykinesia (slowness of movement) this strategy is delayed so less effective. Hence for those who have a significant degree of PD symptoms very effective stabilization of the platform is important. A Seakeeper or the like would be helpful as would a sitting helm position that allows some degree of torso sway to allow a stable head position. Of course docking is considered by many the most difficult powerboat evolution. Here 360 degree awareness, good depth perception and eye hand coordination come into play. Any aid would be helpful. Strong thrusters that don’t time out. Cameras, twins, large rudder. Anything that helps including practice under a skilled teacher.
Don’t want you to think I’m only hanging crape. With thought, appropriate aids, and realistic expectations can see folks with good management by a movement dysorder specialist safely enjoy boating. Especially if they can arrange to have another onboard when they go out who can take over the helm if the task becomes too demanding.
As stated earlier I have no knowledge of where you are in your clinical progression so can’t make no informed comment if your plans are realistic. Again would strongly encourage you seeking an opinion from a neurologist who specializes in PD and discuss if your plans can be safely done.
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Old 10-23-2021, 06:23 AM   #15
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Something stabilized may be nice, allows for going out on more days if you are more time constrained and will be easier to walk around in general, will probably extend your cruising time considerably. Hatteras 42lrc properly fitted out may fit the bill rather well. Less wood and more range and stabilized, also well within your budget and would probobly sell for the same price you buy it. Not a fan of the two beds in the master but I’m sure for a reasonable cost it could be modified for single queen in the master. Plenty of budget to spare at going cost of most I’ve seen lately, here is one for you.
https://2yachts.com/boat/503859-42-lrc
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Old 10-23-2021, 06:29 AM   #16
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Btw hatteras 42 lrc is quite the capable boat and about the only thing it couldn’t do is cross big oceans. Bringing her back from the west coast is well within her capabilities and would be an amazing trip.
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Old 10-25-2021, 12:44 AM   #17
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Parkinsons and a Trawler.

Get a well tricked out GB32. Smaller and easier to handle, plenty room for solo, and easy to dock.. You have the option of the flybridge, but can steer from inside the cabin and the back deck is very comfortable. We have one and love it and cruise on the Great Lakes, a challenging place, perhaps more so than the Eastern Seaboard unless you go offshore. 3.75 nmpg at 1700 rpm with a Lehman 135 at 7.2 knots. We have hot water, AC (reversible heat pump) and a NorthernLights 5kw genset which has a dependable Lugger 3-cylinder engine. I am 76 and my wife is 79 as I write and we love our cruising, but are not seriously impaired in any way. We did modify the interior steering seat because the original is a joke. Also rebuilt the steps going down into the forepeak berth and head area -- cpnverted to three that are 7 x 10 - like house steps. Our 100 gallon tank is plenty and the East Coast has a lot of water!
See the pics in this website. The boat is the Solvogn.
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