Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 05-13-2018, 10:45 AM   #61
Veteran Member
 
City: Puget Sound
Vessel Name: Otis Maximus
Vessel Model: Seasport Navigator
Join Date: May 2017
Posts: 41
Update: First of all thanks everyone for all the comments. Free information is like beer, it should never be turned down (you just don't have to drink it all). The boat looked good and was well taken care of by the second owner. The aft deck had been rebuilt along with other areas of the deck, new plumbing and wiring, new gel coat on the hull and some new interior in 05. The Isuzu engine (125 hp), was massive and in good shape, clean and in order. With 1000 hrs it looked more old than used. The biggest problem was the interior height. It was less than 6', I'm 5-11" and I kept skinning the top of my head, that was in the main cabin and that's not going to fly. I don't have that kind of hair to waste! It's a great boat for a short family.

Any how the search continues.
otis maximus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-13-2018, 01:00 PM   #62
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale. Florida, USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 20,361
Quote:
Originally Posted by otis maximus View Post
Update: First of all thanks everyone for all the comments. Free information is like beer, it should never be turned down (you just don't have to drink it all). The boat looked good and was well taken care of by the second owner. The aft deck had been rebuilt along with other areas of the deck, new plumbing and wiring, new gel coat on the hull and some new interior in 05. The Isuzu engine (125 hp), was massive and in good shape, clean and in order. With 1000 hrs it looked more old than used. The biggest problem was the interior height. It was less than 6', I'm 5-11" and I kept skinning the top of my head, that was in the main cabin and that's not going to fly. I don't have that kind of hair to waste! It's a great boat for a short family.

Any how the search continues.
Wifey B: You certainly showed the reason to get on the boat and check it out thoroughly. Interior height is always a consideration for us and we don't trust anyone's numbers. I think sometimes those that are so close like the 6' vs your 5'11" are the worst as you hit based on how you walk and what you're doing so you think you clear until you bang your head.
BandB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-13-2018, 09:17 PM   #63
Senior Member
 
JohnS's Avatar
 
City: Indianapolis
Vessel Name: MV La Vita Dolce
Vessel Model: Cheoy Lee 40 LRC
Join Date: Mar 2018
Posts: 259
Size and guesstimates

We are new to trawlers, having just bought our first, a Cheoy Lee 40 LRC, but we went through the same "how big does it have to be, and how small can it be" dance in narrowing our search.
We had camped in everything from an oilcloth and wool blankets to a 12 x 20 tent with king bed, dressing room, and dining room, and realized that at this stage of our lives. we like our comfort.

To us this meant a walk around queen bed, and space for at least two comfortable chairs to read in, and 6'4" headroom.
Other requirements were side decks wide enough to handle mooring lines safely, good engines, solid construction, good i terior spaces, and well cared for.
To get the walk around queen in a smaller boat meant an aft cabin, which put our minimum size around 40'.
We want to do the Loop, so draft under 5' was necessary. ee wanted a decent galley and a shower I could fit in.
Headroom was the larger problem, but internet search narrowed it down to 7 possible makes and models, then we went looking at boats in person.
Best of luck on your search.
JohnS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2018, 09:49 AM   #64
Newbie
 
City: bc
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 1
First post here and yes this thread went to the dark side for a while. We are now 6 years back from 3 year, 10,000 NM sabbatical sailing the east coast of the US and the Caribbean on a 41ft catamaran. Starting to think about my next foray which I think will be on a trawler and west coast based.

I think there is a magic length of boat where you can check all the boxes that are important for long(er) term cruising. In the sailing world I think this would be a 36ft monohull and sense the same for a trawler. Too many get caught up with saving for the perfect boat only to never achieve their objective because of $$ (and can never get their head around what the right boat is). Get a boat and go.
After some time you will find out what is important to you and you can always upgrade/downgrade based on what you learn. Big boats are considerably more work to look after and this increases exponentially with length. At 41ft, a buff and wax of our topsides was a 2 day back breaking job that we did every 4-5 months (half done standing/crouching in the tender ... but always in a spectacular anchorage). We never had the funds to have this work done for us (nor did we want to). I could write a book on adventures in getting propane. Sadly the person who checks in and tasks the marina with this is missing all the best and most memorable parts of cruising (ya mon, I dink dere is some propane on da udderside of the island mon (yeah right!)). Generally speaking I think the people cruising on limited budgets and smaller platforms have richer experiences because it not so much about the destination its about the people you meet and often financial status can get in the way of this. But I diverge so will stop here.
Bigbeam is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2018, 11:14 AM   #65
Guru
 
O C Diver's Avatar
 
City: Fort Myers, FL... Summers in Crisfield, MD
Vessel Name: Slow Hand
Vessel Model: Cherubini Independence 45
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 10,122
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigbeam View Post
First post here and yes this thread went to the dark side for a while. We are now 6 years back from 3 year, 10,000 NM sabbatical sailing the east coast of the US and the Caribbean on a 41ft catamaran. Starting to think about my next foray which I think will be on a trawler and west coast based.

I think there is a magic length of boat where you can check all the boxes that are important for long(er) term cruising. In the sailing world I think this would be a 36ft monohull and sense the same for a trawler. Too many get caught up with saving for the perfect boat only to never achieve their objective because of $$ (and can never get their head around what the right boat is). Get a boat and go.
After some time you will find out what is important to you and you can always upgrade/downgrade based on what you learn. Big boats are considerably more work to look after and this increases exponentially with length. At 41ft, a buff and wax of our topsides was a 2 day back breaking job that we did every 4-5 months (half done standing/crouching in the tender ... but always in a spectacular anchorage). We never had the funds to have this work done for us (nor did we want to). I could write a book on adventures in getting propane. Sadly the person who checks in and tasks the marina with this is missing all the best and most memorable parts of cruising (ya mon, I dink dere is some propane on da udderside of the island mon (yeah right!)). Generally speaking I think the people cruising on limited budgets and smaller platforms have richer experiences because it not so much about the destination its about the people you meet and often financial status can get in the way of this. But I diverge so will stop here.
Welcome to the forum!

Interesting first time post. A few misconceptions based on cruising sailboats. A more frugal vessel doesn't make the experience better (common sailor misconception). If it's not about where you're going and what you're seeing, why leave home waters? Ideal size is about where you want to go, what you want to do (bicycle, kayak, explore, etc), and how many people will be on the boat, both full time and guests.

Ted
__________________
Blog: mvslowhand.com
I'm tired of fast moves, I've got a slow groove, on my mind.....
I want to spend some time, Not come and go in a heated rush.....
"Slow Hand" by The Pointer Sisters
O C Diver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2018, 03:40 PM   #66
Guru
 
OldDan1943's Avatar
 
City: Aventura FL
Vessel Name: Kinja
Vessel Model: American Tug 34 #116
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 7,943
Guest are unskilled laborer.
__________________
The meek will inherit the earth but, the brave will inherit the seas.
OldDan1943 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2018, 03:47 PM   #67
Guru
 
OldDan1943's Avatar
 
City: Aventura FL
Vessel Name: Kinja
Vessel Model: American Tug 34 #116
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 7,943
Perhaps this is the time to ask, when one says 41 feet, are we talking OAL plus the swim platform?
Seems the boat builders are NOW counting the swim platform in overall length.
I bought a AT34 which is now called a 36 because the builder started adding in the swim platform. I asked him why to which his response was basically, everyone else is doing it. SHRUG
__________________
The meek will inherit the earth but, the brave will inherit the seas.
OldDan1943 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2018, 03:59 PM   #68
Guru
 
AusCan's Avatar
 
City: Adelaide
Vessel Name: Kokanee
Vessel Model: Cuddles 30 Pilot House Motor Sailer
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 3,202
Quote:
Originally Posted by O C Diver View Post
Welcome to the forum!

Interesting first time post. A few misconceptions based on cruising sailboats. A more frugal vessel doesn't make the experience better (common sailor misconception). If it's not about where you're going and what you're seeing, why leave home waters? Ideal size is about where you want to go, what you want to do (bicycle, kayak, explore, etc), and how many people will be on the boat, both full time and guests.

Ted
I agree its not about the frugal vessel making the experience better.

I think you missed the point Bigbeam was making. It is often the frugal adventure which is more interesting than the all inclusive holiday in the gated community.
AusCan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2018, 06:04 PM   #69
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale. Florida, USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 20,361
Quote:
Originally Posted by AusCan View Post
I agree its not about the frugal vessel making the experience better.

I think you missed the point Bigbeam was making. It is often the frugal adventure which is more interesting than the all inclusive holiday in the gated community.
You're obviously reading a lot between the lines somewhere as he said nothing of that nature.

Here are his exact words after espousing the joy of washing and waxing vs. having a marina do it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bigbeam View Post
Generally speaking I think the people cruising on limited budgets and smaller platforms have richer experiences because it not so much about the destination its about the people you meet and often financial status can get in the way of this. But I diverge so will stop here.
I would love to hear him explain why having money gets in the way of having rich experiences. Guess we're very confused about all the experiences we've had. Guess we should go look for propane and wax a boat to feel fulfilled.

He says it's about the people. Well, more people at marinas than an anchorage as part of the love of anchoring is being away from all the people. And more people while we're exploring the destination on land. We've met thousands of most interesting people including small shop owners, artists and craftsmen. And as to enjoying people, we currently are with a group of 17 friends, about to have dinner at I Sodi in NYC. Does the fact it's an expensive restaurant mean we won't enjoy the company?

I have no issue with those who like simpler or more frugal or those who choose them because of finances. I have no problem with those who are loners or mavericks of various types. The pleasures of boating, as the pleasures of life, aren't limited to any specific ways of doing it. My way isn't better or worse than anyone else's. The thing we all should attempt is to find that way that brings us the most enjoyment, but we don't need to say the experience of others is less rich or less meaningful or less real because it's not our way.
BandB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2018, 06:08 PM   #70
Guru
 
BandB's Avatar
 
City: Fort Lauderdale. Florida, USA
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 20,361
Wifey B: And just, for the record, research shows size does matter.

However, it's just one of many factors.
BandB is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2018, 06:32 PM   #71
Guru
 
siestakey's Avatar
 
City: Sarasota,FL/Thomasville,GA
Vessel Name: Steppin Stone IV
Vessel Model: Marine Trader Kelly Trawler 46
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 1,817
Quote:
Originally Posted by BandB View Post
Wifey B: And just, for the record, research shows size does matter.

However, it's just one of many factors.
After working here in Germany for the last 2 weeks and living in hotel rooms as I do so often I am looking forward to getting to my dirt home with a little more size
__________________
Alan
Skype roatan63
siestakey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2018, 06:45 PM   #72
Guru
 
OldDan1943's Avatar
 
City: Aventura FL
Vessel Name: Kinja
Vessel Model: American Tug 34 #116
Join Date: Oct 2017
Posts: 7,943
Quote:
Originally Posted by BandB View Post
Wifey B: And just, for the record, research shows size does matter.

However, it's just one of many factors.
We are talking about boats, right?
__________________
The meek will inherit the earth but, the brave will inherit the seas.
OldDan1943 is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2018, 06:48 PM   #73
Art
Guru
 
Art's Avatar
 
City: SF Bay Area
Vessel Model: Tollycraft 34' Tri Cabin
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 11,320
Quote:
Originally Posted by RickyD View Post
My wife said she wants a big one.
Be careful to what you agree.

I guess it's the boat to which she implies.
Art is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Trawler Port Captains
Port Captains are TF volunteers who can serve as local guides or assist with local arrangements and information. Search below to locate Port Captains near your destination. To learn more about this program read here: TF Port Captain Program





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:19 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012