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Old 04-22-2019, 05:38 PM   #21
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But its not much more that a zinc anyway and I think you could leave it installed when the zinc is exhausted and just place a new zinc firward of it. I cant imagine that exhausting the zinc would allow the cutter to come lose? But I have never seen one to examine the construction. The cutter is SS.

I just called the manufacturer and they assured me the cutter would not fall off when the zinc depleted. And they also said the stock one is only 1.5" thick so it should fit in very tight places. They said it was NOT sharpened, but that you could sharpen it if you desired. I think I desire.


They also said that if 1.5" was too thick they could custom make one that would fit......I am sure there are limitations, however.


As soon as I divine the shaft size I will be ordering one.....!!
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Old 04-22-2019, 07:22 PM   #22
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Line Cutters

I've used SALCA for about 5yrs and while I replace them yearly there are times where I did because they are also anodes.

As an anode they offer additional boat protection.

I have experience that they are also very effective line cutters.

Fitting between the strut and the prop I can't see any drag coefficient.

I just bought new 1's for this season but will check the existing set on the shaft (we were and will be in fresh water again this year so I'll probably save the new set.

Didn't understand the frequent replacement comment, BUT if someone has these and needs frequent replacement then they have a big issue with electrolysis.

I guess it boils down to paying $300 or more per shaft or $50.

Make your choice.
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Old 04-23-2019, 06:29 PM   #23
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But its not much more that a zinc anyway and I think you could leave it installed when the zinc is exhausted and just place a new zinc firward of it. I cant imagine that exhausting the zinc would allow the cutter to come lose? But I have never seen one to examine the construction. The cutter is SS.
So you think the zinc will not deteriorate enough inside of a year or so to compromise the strength requiring replacement? The blade appears to be simply pinned through the zinc for support.
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Old 04-23-2019, 08:06 PM   #24
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So you think the zinc will not deteriorate enough inside of a year or so to compromise the strength requiring replacement? The blade appears to be simply pinned through the zinc for support.
My prop shaft zinc never needs replacing....or at least doesn't now and it was put on two years ago. And I am also putting on a ShaftSaver that is actually designed to absorb shock when you hit something hard with the prop. But in the process it also electrically isolates the prop shaft from the engine effectively blocking any current path for corrosion. So it may last forever.

But even if I replaced it every year, it costs $38 and a plain zinc costs $24 so it costs me $14 more a year to have a line cutter. It would take me 20 years IF I CHANGED IT EVERY YEAR to spend as much more as a plain line cutter costs!!!!!..........

If you change the shaft zinc every year you have BIGGER PROBLEMS to worry about!!!!
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Old 04-24-2019, 06:27 AM   #25
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My prop shaft zinc never needs replacing....or at least doesn't now and it was put on two years ago. And I am also putting on a ShaftSaver that is actually designed to absorb shock when you hit something hard with the prop. But in the process it also electrically isolates the prop shaft from the engine effectively blocking any current path for corrosion. So it may last forever.

But even if I replaced it every year, it costs $38 and a plain zinc costs $24 so it costs me $14 more a year to have a line cutter. It would take me 20 years IF I CHANGED IT EVERY YEAR to spend as much more as a plain line cutter costs!!!!!..........

If you change the shaft zinc every year you have BIGGER PROBLEMS to worry about!!!!
Everyone changes zincs every year where I am, my line cutter cost $129 when I bought it five years ago and I don't know if you've ever cruised the Maine coast but we have a lobster pot about every ten feet and mine has worked fine. But of course you should spend your money how you chose, I happen to be frugal so I look for what works and isn't overly expensive. By the way the current path from the engine isn't necessarily what eats zincs, may I suggest "Metal Corrosion in Boats" as a reference on the subject of stray current.
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Old 04-24-2019, 08:34 AM   #26
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Slightly off topic, I would suggest that if any boat has sacrificial anodes which last "years", there is an issue with those anodes not providing protection.
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Old 04-24-2019, 09:12 AM   #27
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Slightly off topic, I would suggest that if any boat has sacrificial anodes which last "years", there is an issue with those anodes not providing protection.
Good point, that's why I suggested a reference source, there's much more to preventing electrolysis than sticking zinc in the water.
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Old 04-24-2019, 11:01 AM   #28
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Everyone changes zincs every year where I am, my line cutter cost $129 when I bought it five years ago and I don't know if you've ever cruised the Maine coast but we have a lobster pot about every ten feet and mine has worked fine. But of course you should spend your money how you chose, I happen to be frugal so I look for what works and isn't overly expensive. By the way the current path from the engine isn't necessarily what eats zincs, may I suggest "Metal Corrosion in Boats" as a reference on the subject of stray current.

Your condescending tone not withstanding, I will respond.

As you say, it depends on where you are. Where I am zincs dont need changing every year and I check them every 6 months. My diver will check mine this week. Yes, you may recommend the book, but I have read enough I dont need a new one. Yes, there can be corrosion without a direct path, but usually in a marina with bad wiring. And USUALLY not severe. I am NOT in a marina. If you want to justify your expenses by your environment, thats fine, you should. My environment is apparently much cleaner electrically.

Again, if you change your zincs yearly, you have a problem that you should be fixing. Maybe on your boat, maybe in your marina. May I suggest an isolation transformer and/or possibly solar panels instead of shore connection.
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Old 04-24-2019, 12:36 PM   #29
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Your condescending tone not withstanding, I will respond.

As you say, it depends on where you are. Where I am zincs dont need changing every year and I check them every 6 months. My diver will check mine this week. Yes, you may recommend the book, but I have read enough I dont need a new one. Yes, there can be corrosion without a direct path, but usually in a marina with bad wiring. And USUALLY not severe. I am NOT in a marina. If you want to justify your expenses by your environment, thats fine, you should. My environment is apparently much cleaner electrically.

Again, if you change your zincs yearly, you have a problem that you should be fixing. Maybe on your boat, maybe in your marina. May I suggest an isolation transformer and/or possibly solar panels instead of shore connection.
My boats on a mooring in a harbor with no marina or dockside electric, every boat here and to my knowledge the Maine coast changes zincs on at least an annual basis. As alluded to there's more to this issue than simply a zinc, I'm happy for you that this isn't an issue but I must say I've never heard of someone that has "read enough". As I appear to have annoyed you with my comments, for which I apologize, I wish you the best of luck and happy boating.
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Old 04-24-2019, 01:00 PM   #30
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I've never heard of someone that has "read enough". As I appear to have annoyed you with my comments, for which I apologize, I wish you the best of luck and happy boating.
When it comes to corrosion, its not hard to get to "read enough" I find no two books that agree on the subject. Been reading for over 78 years.

You did not annoy me with your comments, only with the tone of condescension. All comments are valuable in a discussion, but attitude is not. And it continues with the comment about "read enough". Thus your apology is insincere. You are still condescending, apology aside.
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Old 04-24-2019, 01:35 PM   #31
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When it comes to corrosion, its not hard to get to "read enough" I find no two books that agree on the subject. Been reading for over 78 years.

You did not annoy me with your comments, only with the tone of condescension. All comments are valuable in a discussion, but attitude is not. And it continues with the comment about "read enough". Thus your apology is insincere. You are still condescending, apology aside.
"So you think the zinc will not deteriorate enough inside of a year or so to compromise the strength requiring replacement? The blade appears to be simply pinned through the zinc for support." Yup! That sure looks "condescending". I simply though some may have interest in a more cost effective solution, that you decided to interpret it as condescending is quite frankly your problem. Please feel free to ignore my apology if it offends you. I believe it may be appropriate to end this exchange, thanks and have a nice day.
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