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Old 03-14-2019, 04:45 AM   #21
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The S36 and S40 share the same basic FD hull. Without stabilizers they roll a lot. The N37 may well have the advantage in this regard.

Dirtdoc, it is not a given that a FD hull will perform better in heavy seas than a SD. There are many design factors that go into defining seaworthiness beyond substituting an F for an S.
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Old 03-14-2019, 06:02 AM   #22
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We appreciate all the feed back and are getting excited about our search!
Dont over look the American Tug 34/36 or the 41/?
VERY comfortable except for closet space. The 34/36 ..... well if you put in a washer/dryer you lose a bit of storage space. Personally, I like my washer dryer
I found a way to add 5 small cabinets allowing me to store "important" stuff.
If the next owner doesn't like all the additions...... dont buy my boat. LOL

I put some hydraulic assists for access under the forward berth.... that opened up a big new world, yet to be filled ..... More on that later.

To be honest, the cabinet makers I use are expensive but we go way back.....
I only have little jobs compared the the much larger boat he now works on
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Old 03-14-2019, 11:32 AM   #23
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This quote taken from Selene's website under "The Selene Advantage" tab...


Knowing that a Selene Yacht owner often has to be both the captain and engineer of the vessel, we have invested a lot of time in the design of our engine rooms, which are regarded in the industry as best in their class with good access, plenty of room to work around the systems, with ease of maintenance and service in mind.
We install only first class electrical brands for batteries, generators, inverters, chargers, light fixtures, etc. Our engineering team is always ready to assist our owners in the sizing of their yachtís electrical system with the desired level of redundancy depending on how the yacht is going to be used.

The design incorporates the fuel efficiency of a full-displacement hull. A full-displacement hull is designed to remain fully in the water throughout its entire range of speed. This requires a fraction of the horsepower that semi-displacement or planing hull requires to attain optimum speed. A full-displacement hull will be capable of maintaining speeds in the 7- to l2-knot range while burning a minimum of fuel.




Seem all Selene hulls are FD.
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Old 03-14-2019, 03:48 PM   #24
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To the OP: I can't say anything good or bad about Selene as i have not been aboard one, but i've spent time on Nordics including under way. The Nordic is a great and sturdy boat and from what I saw; very easy to work on with logical plumbing, wiring, and a commanding pilot house with very good sight lines both forward and aft. Its also nice having the pilot house side doors on both sides and (IMHO) nice to have a little extra power whenever you want it but sipping diesel the rest of the time.


As someone else mentioned, if you're considering a Nordic, it would definitely make sense to compare it to an American Tug. Good luck!
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Old 03-14-2019, 04:51 PM   #25
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Regardless of the CE rating. A full displacement hull is going to perform better than a semi displacement hull in heavy seas. My boat has a semi displacement hull and is considered a coastal cruiser because of that. I'm not going to be offended if someone states that it's not a blue water boat - because it isn't. I didn't mean to imply that the NT was lacking in any way because of the hull design. Am I incorrect when I state that the NT has a SD hull and the Selene has a FD hull? If I am incorrect about that then I will stand corrected, otherwise I stand by my statement.
The connection of CE rating to FD vs. SD is just not right, no more than implying only one type hull is seaworthy or capable of being a CE-A. There are a lot of factors in that and even more in seaworthiness. There are many FD boats that are truly coastal cruisers but then most of what is done by people here is coastal cruising. Just for the record and to destroy the stereotype, we have a 44 foot planing boat that will run just over 40 knots and it is CE-A. Quite seaworthy. Only problem is range is only about 210 nm.
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Old 03-14-2019, 08:44 PM   #26
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I wish a naval architect would get in on the conversation. It's actually turned out to be pretty interesting.

I doubt any boats/ships that are designed to cross oceans have semi displacement hulls.
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Old 03-14-2019, 09:45 PM   #27
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I wish a naval architect would get in on the conversation. It's actually turned out to be pretty interesting.

I doubt any boats/ships that are designed to cross oceans have semi displacement hulls.
I could point to hundreds of yachts that do. Some even with planing hulls. Clearly larger boats. In smaller, I'd point to Fleming and Elling as sea worthy but without perhaps the range in the smaller ones. Outer Reef is designed for crossing oceans. Then we have Catamarans from several builders. Cheoy Lee, Horizon, and Selene have produced many different hull designs for passagemaking.

I have to point out the new Selene.
The new Selene 59 Ocean Clipper is the very latest iteration of Howard Chenís talentÖ Designed for a Selene repeat customer in Europe who wanted a yacht as beautiful and safe as any Selene, but faster in order to explore the Mediterranean Sea without sacrificing any of the ocean-going capability of the Selene Ocean Trawlers. Howard Chenís design team took on the challenge, working with the renowned Dutch designer Guido de Groot, and the new Ocean Clipper semi-displacement line was born !
And what about sailboats? Most of them would not qualify as full displacement and more of them cross than trawlers do.

The point is that there are plenty of seaworthy boats of various hull designs. Most who do long ocean crosses in smaller boats do have full displacement, but there are many other reasons they choose to have it.
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Old 03-14-2019, 09:53 PM   #28
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I could point to hundreds of yachts that do. Some even with planing hulls. Clearly larger boats. In smaller, I'd point to Fleming and Elling as sea worthy but without perhaps the range in the smaller ones. Outer Reef is designed for crossing oceans. Then we have Catamarans from several builders. Cheoy Lee, Horizon, and Selene have produced many different hull designs for passagemaking.

I have to point out the new Selene.
The new Selene 59 Ocean Clipper is the very latest iteration of Howard Chen’s talent… Designed for a Selene repeat customer in Europe who wanted a yacht as beautiful and safe as any Selene, but faster in order to explore the Mediterranean Sea without sacrificing any of the ocean-going capability of the Selene Ocean Trawlers. Howard Chen’s design team took on the challenge, working with the renowned Dutch designer Guido de Groot, and the new Ocean Clipper semi-displacement line was born !
And what about sailboats? Most of them would not qualify as full displacement and more of them cross than trawlers do.

The point is that there are plenty of seaworthy boats of various hull designs. Most who do long ocean crosses in smaller boats do have full displacement, but there are many other reasons they choose to have it.
Hmmm..
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Old 03-14-2019, 10:01 PM   #29
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I could point to hundreds of yachts that do. Some even with planing hulls. Clearly larger boats. In smaller, I'd point to Fleming and Elling as sea worthy but without perhaps the range in the smaller ones. Outer Reef is designed for crossing oceans. Then we have Catamarans from several builders. Cheoy Lee, Horizon, and Selene have produced many different hull designs for passagemaking.

I have to point out the new Selene.
The new Selene 59 Ocean Clipper is the very latest iteration of Howard Chenís talentÖ Designed for a Selene repeat customer in Europe who wanted a yacht as beautiful and safe as any Selene, but faster in order to explore the Mediterranean Sea without sacrificing any of the ocean-going capability of the Selene Ocean Trawlers. Howard Chenís design team took on the challenge, working with the renowned Dutch designer Guido de Groot, and the new Ocean Clipper semi-displacement line was born !
And what about sailboats? Most of them would not qualify as full displacement and more of them cross than trawlers do.

The point is that there are plenty of seaworthy boats of various hull designs. Most who do long ocean crosses in smaller boats do have full displacement, but there are many other reasons they choose to have it.



OK, Have to ask this. There has been fun reading on FD/SD/Planing on another thread. I'm just the reader here so here goes.


Barring Cat hulls (which can be displacement or SD/Planing I believe) Are there sail boats that are not FD hulls that can plane or go faster than the 1.?? times the waterline length?
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Old 03-14-2019, 11:35 PM   #30
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Barring Cat hulls (which can be displacement or SD/Planing I believe) Are there sail boats that are not FD hulls that can plane or go faster than the 1.?? times the waterline length?
Yes.
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Old 03-15-2019, 08:29 AM   #31
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. Are there sail boats that are not FD hulls that can plane or go faster than the 1.?? times the waterline length?
Many. For grins check out the Volvo Ocean Racing website. Fifty years ago I sailed on a Scow that was a planing sailboat.
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Old 03-15-2019, 10:07 AM   #32
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the 1.?? times the waterline length?
You do know I'm sure that the formula is 1.?? times the square root of the waterline length.
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Old 03-15-2019, 12:21 PM   #33
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You do know I'm sure that the formula is 1.?? times the square root of the waterline length.



Couldn't come up with it exactly after tennis and refreshments...
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Old 03-15-2019, 04:13 PM   #34
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Couldn't come up with it exactly after tennis and refreshments...
Wifey B: Could come up with it, but it varies by hull design and there's also a lot of debate on what the number should be. People argue everything from 1.1 to 1.34. I figured that was why the other poster used ??.

And after tennis only food and water. Now, today, just got home from a little excursion down the coast to Miami. We also gave into the masses and dinner tonight is going to be home made pizza. The girls will make versions beyond imagination. Some you don't even want to imagine. Latest rumor has about 20 people for dinner/pizza tonight. When they go into the kitchen just looking for what else they can find to toss on one, that's when you get scared.

Now, if it was up to me to make them, I'd do it by picking up the phone and dialing.
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Old 03-18-2019, 01:51 PM   #35
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Have you looked at

A Fleming? Access to the flybridge and engines is the best. At the Lauderdale boat show we looked at the Nortics. Love the stout lines but hated the flybridge access. Running to the stern is a non starter. Entering an inlet or north Iím always on the flybridge. All three are great boats.
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Old 03-18-2019, 03:27 PM   #36
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Interesting however don't get so wrapped up in FD vrs SD as the variations are extreme.
For example, the Great Harbour N's are full displacement ( N37 with 36' wll)weigh 48,000 loaded) and the N/GH 47's are transatlantic capable. In fact the factory took an N-37 from Jax fla to Hawaii thru the P Canal. Then took another one from JAX to Bermuda and then to Newport. The boats are unsinkable and shallow draft (2'10" in salt 3' in fresh) wide hard chined boats with twin small engines with skeg protected props and rudders and a form stable hull design. (Google Lou Codega NA/NE PE from Webb and MIT) who designed these who is widely considered to be a hull performance expert. Most NTs and Selene's require stabilization(active or birds) for a safe comfortable ride. https://tinyurl.com/y94yqw3w
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Old 03-18-2019, 07:19 PM   #37
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I'd recommend checking out a Krogen 39. My favorite!
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Old 03-18-2019, 09:22 PM   #38
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Smile 39 Krogen

We love those as well, we had a friend with a newer 48 and it was amazing. Did they ever make a 39 with two staterooms? I have been following them on yatch world but never saw a two stateroom model. We are trying to stay under 40 feet to fit in our slip and keep cost relatively in check. Actual slip is 45 feet but we would prefer not to have the boat so tight it makes it hard to get in and out of.
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Old 03-18-2019, 10:13 PM   #39
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I think the KK 39 only came with one stateroom. The engine room with standing headroom is really amazing.
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Old 03-19-2019, 12:48 AM   #40
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Reelalure,
I like Kadey Krogen as well. However, could not afford any except for a few of the older KK42. The 39 is only a single cabin.

Good friends of ours have owned two. They first owned a KK44, a perfect boat in my opinion. Now they own a KK52, a beautiful boat, but too big (and outside my price point) for me. The smallest KK with 2 cabins that I know of (am not familiar with the Manatee) is the KK42 which was replaced by the KK44.
Based on what I have been told by my friends and other KK owners, you would want stabilization as a feature.
Regards,
Tom
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