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Old 04-14-2019, 06:59 AM   #21
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Side ties and large freighter wakes might be more of a problem than free moored in my experience....unless there is a significant breakwater engineering that is well secured.
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Old 04-14-2019, 10:12 AM   #22
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Hmm, logs do arrive with regularity especially this time of year, however that would need to happen after initially setting up somehow, and I’d need a more powerful dink than I have probably. And being 100’ between dolphins would mean I’d need to chain several logs together end to end. But, it’s a great idea that I may examine later. We do have a mini tug nearby who’s main purpose is dragging home large found objects.

The galley is currently pretty spartan. Doesn’t look like a stove was ever installed, just a dorm fridge and a sink at the moment. Sink dumps overboard so I’m guessing I’ll need to put a Y valve on it for legal. Same with shower.
I like the gimbal idea but I’ll see how much we rock n roll first to see if it’s necessary. The in-deck hot tub might stabilize us enough.
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Old 04-14-2019, 02:27 PM   #23
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Hereís what Iím thinking. Use the weight on front chain to pull her forward and keep her in general position there, but allow slack if I reverse hard enough to pull up weight. Maybe thatís what heavy chain accomplishes too, although I could come up with a weight for less than big chain costs. Maybe 200 lbs of concrete with an eye bolt cast into it?
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Old 04-14-2019, 02:35 PM   #24
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Greetings,
Mr. SW. The name for that "weight" on your forward chain is a kellet.
Sinking a Myth ‚Äď The Anchor Kellet
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Old 04-14-2019, 02:46 PM   #25
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Hereís what Iím thinking. Use the weight on front chain to pull her forward and keep her in general position there, but allow slack if I reverse hard enough to pull up weight. Maybe thatís what heavy chain accomplishes too, although I could come up with a weight for less than big chain costs. Maybe 200 lbs of concrete with an eye bolt cast into it?

Just think about how you are going to maneuver in there, pick up the bow mooring and secure it, then pickup the stern mooring and secure it, while not getting your prop fouled, all with a cross wind blowing like hell, and a side current.
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Old 04-14-2019, 04:10 PM   #26
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Just think about how you are going to maneuver in there, pick up the bow mooring and secure it, then pickup the stern mooring and secure it, while not getting your prop fouled, all with a cross wind blowing like hell, and a side current.
Right. Thatís what Iím thinking about.
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Old 04-14-2019, 04:42 PM   #27
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Greetings,
Mr. SW. The name for that "weight" on your forward chain is a kellet.
Sinking a Myth ‚€“ The Anchor Kellet
Ah yes, a Kellet! So many things I’ll be learning for the first time, and some even for the second and third!

Hmm, however the description listed doesn’t address the way I want to use it, my situation being unique in that I have the option of “anchoring” at the water surface, and use the kellet as a means to generally tension the boat to a particular position. If wind pushes the boat against it and raises the kellet, that won’t matter so much for the stern anchor because it will be slack at that point anyway.
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Old 04-14-2019, 05:01 PM   #28
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So the rated size for docking etc is 5/8 but that seems a little small for anchoring permanently. Is 1” a better choice for that?
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Old 04-15-2019, 05:24 AM   #29
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"So the rated size for docking etc is 5/8 but that seems a little small for anchoring permanently. Is 1” a better choice for that?"

The stretch ability of nylon is what usually keeps loads in check.

Thin line should stretch , where thick line may simply rip the cleat out.

A 1 inch line would fit a 16 inch cleat .
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Old 04-15-2019, 08:02 AM   #30
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So the rated size for docking etc is 5/8 but that seems a little small for anchoring permanently. Is 1Ē a better choice for that?

What's unique about your situation is that you won't swing into the wind and current, and mooring/anchoring gear sizing assumes that you will.


Your worst case will be broadside to both the wind and the current creating a much larger load. Then, to make matters worse, your line/chain angle will not be in line with the load, but rather close to perpendicular. I'd have to dust off some very old trig to figure it out, but the pull force on the lines will be many times large than the broadside load of the boat.


Unfortunately I can't tell what size is needed, but just suggest you get someone who can figure it out, or just go really, really big on everything.
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Old 04-15-2019, 09:47 AM   #31
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Gah! This is making my brain hurt! Cleat size is also very relevant. I could go 3/4 no problem but the 1” might be too big for the cleats.
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Old 04-16-2019, 05:32 AM   #32
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"I could go 3/4 no problem but the 1Ē might be too big for the cleats."

1/2 line would use an 8 inch cleat

3/4 line a 12 inch cleat and

1 inch line 16 inch cleat to be kind to the line.
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Old 04-16-2019, 06:06 AM   #33
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Hereís what Iím thinking. Use the weight on front chain to pull her forward and keep her in general position there, but allow slack if I reverse hard enough to pull up weight. Maybe thatís what heavy chain accomplishes too, although I could come up with a weight for less than big chain costs. Maybe 200 lbs of concrete with an eye bolt cast into it?
SeaWorld, why don't you just run a chain from the dolphin to that wreck if it is solid, or possible ON-shore if your buddy has the rights (easier to dump a 2 ton load of concrete on land than in the water). Chain a mooring ball at the midpoint, then just float to the mooring. Let your boat swing.
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Old 04-16-2019, 10:11 PM   #34
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SeaWorld, why don't you just run a chain from the dolphin to that wreck if it is solid, or possible ON-shore if your buddy has the rights (easier to dump a 2 ton load of concrete on land than in the water). Chain a mooring ball at the midpoint, then just float to the mooring. Let your boat swing.
In the depths of summer Iím not sure there will be enough room to swing. That is a good idea though as it would allow a lot of adjustment options.
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Old 04-16-2019, 10:31 PM   #35
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SeaWorld, why don't you just run a chain from the dolphin to that wreck if it is solid, or possible ON-shore if your buddy has the rights (easier to dump a 2 ton load of concrete on land than in the water). Chain a mooring ball at the midpoint, then just float to the mooring. Let your boat swing.
This image from late July shows a little different story! I knew the river dropped a bit but I didnít realize it was this much. So, this changes things a little.

What about connecting a line or chain between both dolphins so I can tie in the center of that. My thought is that would allow some spring for wakes so we arenít jerking in the chain or using too much scope that will allow the boat to move too far into danger.
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Old 04-16-2019, 11:04 PM   #36
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If you don`t have to moor fore and aft, to restrict swing or for some other reason, don`t. It can expose the boat to loads,especially side on. Sydney has a lot of moored boats, our Maritime Authority wanted everyone to moor fore and aft,well founded expert objections to the practice saw the move dropped. Picking them up is no fun either, San Francisco has bays with them adjacent to a recreational island the name of which escapes me,TF users may like to comment on this.
Of course if you can build a small floating village with a nice dock,that would be a good way to go.
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Old 04-16-2019, 11:39 PM   #37
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I think I could allow a swing through 180į but not full swing, there isn’t enough room.
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Old 04-19-2019, 01:20 PM   #38
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You need to research the jurisdiction of the submerged land. Where I live all submerged land and beach up to the vegetation line or "highest wash of the waves" line belongs to the state. There is no such a thing as a private beach. As such there is no legal way to get to a mooring even if you lease the submerged land for the state, which you can do. In this case you must access your mooring by tender from a legal location or facility like a nearby marine.
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Old 04-19-2019, 03:04 PM   #39
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You need to research the jurisdiction of the submerged land. Where I live all submerged land and beach up to the vegetation line or "highest wash of the waves" line belongs to the state. There is no such a thing as a private beach. As such there is no legal way to get to a mooring even if you lease the submerged land for the state, which you can do. In this case you must access your mooring by tender from a legal location or facility like a nearby marine.
I agree. I doubt its unclaimed, especially after seeing where it is. It appears this location is the Wilamette R. in Portland, just downstream from the St Johns Bridge.

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Both the city (it covers that area on both sides of the river) and state have regulations that seem to prohibit making your own moorage location. The state owns the rivers and it looks like the city has some authority over it as well. I doubt you can reasonably say its legally unclaimed. I would start by checking with the Harbormaster and/or Oregon state lands to determine what you can put in place. A quick check of their regulations show you must have something written from them for mooring anything over 30 days.
https://www.portlandoregon.gov/citycode/28720#cid_18050


Also, the land that forms that little cove is owned by the Port of Portland, so I'm guessing there may be something in the lease your friend has about what is allowed. Here's the link showing the land ownership.
https://www.portlandmaps.com/detail/...T/R324085_did/
It looks like there are two parcels of land - one where the dock you want to use to tender to is being used by Green Acres, the other is where the cove is. Is he leasing that parcel to?

I point all this out because it seems like you might be lulled into staking a claim, which quit working in a different century. It could really put you in a bind if someone official comes along and you suddenly have to move your new boat! Its hard enough to find affordable moorage on waiting lists, almost impossible to find it all of a sudden.
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Old 04-19-2019, 04:09 PM   #40
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Let’s not get too caught up in my improper terminology. The fact is that the land, piers and cove are being legally leased by my friend who is giving me permission to float here. It’s not the 1800’s and I recognize that.
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