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Old 04-17-2018, 02:19 PM   #21
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We lived and cruised on a sailboat for 10 years and over 40,000 miles. Our longest passage was 24 days and had many over 10 days. We had a 27’ ChistCraft and 34’ Mainship before we bought the Slocum 43, cutter rigged sailboat. We bought the sailboat to go cruising full time. For us it was a great fit. We had all the creature comforts that we have on Hobo; central heat, a serperate fridge/freezer, 24 gallon per hour watermaker, 5 Kw NL generator, etc. You get the idea, we weren’t camping.

We’ve had Hobo now for 11 years and at times I do miss having the ability to shut off the engine and have the quite. There’s nothing like being on watch at 2 am, with horizon to horizon stars with just the sound of the wind and water passing by over the hull.

That being said, if I want to go sailing, I have a brother who has sailboat on the Chesapeake. They use it extensively to go day sailing not cruising. They love it and wouldn’t consider a power boat.

Using a boat as a condo or for coastal cruising, give me a power boat. For crossing oceans give me sail.

Larry,

I’ve been watching the Sailing LaVagabond YouTube channel for awhile now, and they are are currently sailing across the Atlantic headed towards Florida. Their new boat is a 45’ Outremer catamaran, and it sure seems fast and stable. On the last video they talk about surfing down waves at 19 knots. Is that safe? Would you be comfortable ocean cruising on a cat? Is reefing early and often even more important on a cat because of all the stress on the rig?
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Old 04-17-2018, 02:49 PM   #22
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Surfing down waves at 19 knots? Not me. I’d be afraid I’d bury a hull. There’s no reason for me to go that fast in the open ocean. You have to pay way too much attention to what’s going on. I like to relax, set the AP, read a book and try to catch some fish.

I would feel comfortable in an open ocean capable cat. We have several friends cruising on them. I think they are like any other boat, they all have limitations. Usally though, the boat can take more than the people.
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Old 04-17-2018, 02:57 PM   #23
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Seems like half the people on here switch over from sailing.
Why??

The only downfall I can see is bridge clearance and a few extra things to maintain. What's the rub??

All that to say, I am very happy with the GB, just trying to figure out what I'm missing.
There are a few different reasons why people give up sailing.
They are no longer fit enough. Sailing requires a bit more fitness and nimbleness in comparison to motoring.

They are in the wrong place. Some areas don't get much wind. Or the wind tends to be accompanied with wet ugly weather.

Most sailboats are poorly designed for living. Many only offer a choice between an open, unprotected cockpit and a closed off claustrophobic interior.
I'm lucky enough to be still fit enough to get around on a sailboat, and live in a place with lots of wind and no bridges over the water.
A pilot house sailboat offers the same outlook as a trawler style boat, plus the option of quietly gliding across the water. The big bonus of having sails is the added stability in rough water.

Depending on conditions - Sometimes I motor, sometimes I sail, but usually I motorsail.
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Old 04-17-2018, 02:59 PM   #24
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Below is a copy of a post I did the day I saw my old sailboat out sailing

Last weekend. Sunny and lots of wind. Small craft warnings are up as we head to Port Townsend.
My Catalina 30 sailboat is just flying! Waves are breaking and the spray in flying. You kinda get into this rhythm. Bounce, crash, splash, take off glasses and wipe clean, put glasses back on. Repeat.

Even through its on the warm side the whole crew is wearing foulies, but hey, that’s boating up here in the Pacific North West.

I am so thankful that I sold my Catalina 30 to my buddy Mike.

As I pass him in my trawler I give him a wave with my coffee cup. I don’t think he saw me, he was dodging another wave and his glasses were covered in salt spray.

I think, “Oh well, I'll see him back at the marina” as I walk back to the stove in my stocking feet to pour another cup of coffee.

Great day on the water


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Old 04-17-2018, 03:02 PM   #25
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I like being cold and wet, living in cramped, dark quarters, not having enough water or electricity, moving slowly or in a direction other than my destination, and not carrying enough fuel. What's not to like?
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Old 04-17-2018, 03:06 PM   #26
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Is reefing early and often even more important on a cat because of all the stress on the rig?
A monohull has a built-in safety release; it heels over and spills the wind out the top of the sail when hit by and unexpected big gust.

Because a cat heels very little, the rigging has to handle the full force of the gust. An early reef is always wise to avoid blowing out sails, or breaking rigging.
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Old 04-17-2018, 03:19 PM   #27
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I thought this was very telling
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Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
The view out the windows of a trawler is much better than the view out of most sailboats.
Sailors want to be right out in nature, no windows in between.

Giving up the creature comforts is often most of the point for them.
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Old 04-17-2018, 03:32 PM   #28
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Sitting inside motor sailing. Not a huge pilothouse by any stretch compared to most of the trawlers here, but it beats sitting outside!

If I want to sit out in the weather I can motorsail from the hot tub using the remote.
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If I want to act like a real sailor I sit on this pink padded rail in the cockpit and watch the sails. Not a great spot when super rough however.
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Old 04-17-2018, 03:33 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AusCan View Post
A monohull has a built-in safety release; it heels over and spills the wind out the top of the sail when hit by and unexpected big gust.

Because a cat heels very little, the rigging has to handle the full force of the gust. An early reef is always wise to avoid blowing out sails, or breaking rigging.

Reef before grief was our mantra on a fast cat
More often than not high speed can still be maintained with reduced sail.

At night to keep speed down if wind was up we'd just jog along under heady and still get in the teens on occasion.
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Old 04-17-2018, 03:44 PM   #30
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CD: I like your smiling copilot. Larry, aka, Healhustler, craftsmen extraordinaire, on Bucky? Sorry we missed you guys on our way by.
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Old 04-17-2018, 04:23 PM   #31
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Larry is an excellent sailor as it turns out. When my drone was in flyaway mode and I was out on deck with the controller in O-sh$t mode, he whipped the boat around with full sails flying in an attempt to follow the drone.

Full disclosure, I’m not sure he remembered the sails were up.
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Old 04-17-2018, 04:35 PM   #32
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Quote:
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Larry,

I’ve been watching the Sailing LaVagabond YouTube channel for awhile now, and they are are currently sailing across the Atlantic headed towards Florida. Their new boat is a 45’ Outremer catamaran, and it sure seems fast and stable. On the last video they talk about surfing down waves at 19 knots. Is that safe? Would you be comfortable ocean cruising on a cat? Is reefing early and often even more important on a cat because of all the stress on the rig?
I would not want to be in that type of water in a cat. If it goes turtle, all is over. You can knock down a monohull sailboat and it will come back up. If you roll it, you will have lost your rig, but you will still be floating.
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Old 04-17-2018, 04:57 PM   #33
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I If it goes turtle, all is over. You can knock down a monohull sailboat and it will come back up. If you roll it, you will have lost your rig, but you will still be floating.
If it goes turtle you have a massive highly visible life raft.

The mono on the other hand, if it loses a rig, can easily be holed by a still attached swinging mast section and sink.
It can lose its keel and sink
It can lose a through hull and sink
It has happened before, the ocean floor is littered with evidence.

I have had both types and have sailed and raced in some pretty wild conditions.
I doubt id ever go back to a monohulled sailing vessel.
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Old 04-17-2018, 05:04 PM   #34
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Greetings,
I will shamefully admit I've been on sailboats twice in my life. Thankfully they never left the dock. The wind is either too weak, too strong or from the wrong direction. Then it's iron spinnaker time.
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Old 04-17-2018, 05:10 PM   #35
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I was a co owner of a sailboat 30 years ago and learned a lot from my partner who had an offshore racing background. The boat was sold when I got married because we could not afford a boat so I had fun with surfboards for my ocean fix.

Got back into boating seven years ago, and did the express cruiser thing. It made more sense to have the speed while my kids were still with us and we had limited time to go places. Great memories on a 39 Sea Ray that never gave me any issues.

Our kids are gone and we are getting closer to retirement, so on to the next phase, a single engine boat that cruises at 7 to 8 with lots of living space. Trawler versus sailboat is summed up well in previous posts by people who have much more experience than I do on sailboats. Also, the physical aspects with a bad back, knees etc. I couldn’t do the sailboat route even if I wanted to.

It’s all good. Whatever gets you on the water and makes you happy.
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Old 04-17-2018, 05:32 PM   #36
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I sailed full keel sailboats for about 25 years, days weekends and months, twice to the Bahamas. There is a feeling that comes thru the tiller coupled with the wind and sound of the water on the hull. Sails set, and the power of the wind and sails set drawing the boat thru the water that has to be expieienced to understand the why of sailing. The physical requirements of sailing, spartan living and sailing in weather, convinced me it was time to transition to trawlers. I still would not turn down the chance to day sail a Cape Dory Typhoon, my favorite small sailboat if ever offered.
Bill
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Old 04-17-2018, 06:26 PM   #37
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I don’t know the answer but this is what I did and what I’m doing now
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Old 04-17-2018, 09:17 PM   #38
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Quote:
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Larry is an excellent sailor as it turns out. When my drone was in flyaway mode and I was out on deck with the controller in O-sh$t mode, he whipped the boat around with full sails flying in an attempt to follow the drone.

Full disclosure, I’m not sure he remembered the sails were up.
In addition to an excellent sailor and boat pilot, Bill has recently added drone acrobatics to his skill set. While I was at the helm and in the process of conducting the ultimate jibe, he actually flew the drone full throttle through the rigging without touching anything, then flipped her upside down for a perfect four point landing in the water. I haven't seen a more deliberate splash down since the Mercury program.
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Old 04-17-2018, 09:50 PM   #39
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Originally Posted by john61ct View Post
I thought this was very telling

Sailors want to be right out in nature, no windows in between.

Giving up the creature comforts is often most of the point for them.
When you are at anchor, and the bears are on the beach, in a sailboat you have no idea they are. Likewise any form of wildlife near your boat when not underway... which was my point.
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Old 04-17-2018, 10:49 PM   #40
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I love sailing and sailboats. Mostly sailed in SoCal and chartered in other locations.
Now own a trawler. Going to do the Great Loop. It’s the right boat for us for this trip. Might charter a sailboat when we get to the Great Lakes.
For me it’s pick the adventure and then pick the right boat for your adventure so it doesn’t turn into an ordeal.
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