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Old 01-21-2022, 02:36 PM   #81
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What are the options if any on adding gas to diesel to make a few more miles.

any percentage mix that are acceptable and or addling ATF or something like that to the mix.
ZERO GAS!!!!!
ATF can add a bit of lubricity to diesel FOR OLDER diesel enjines only, but will create injector nozzle deposits, ruining efficiency in long term.
I would never do it.
Approved additive for diesel only.
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Old 01-21-2022, 03:01 PM   #82
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c'mon, be sensible. Everyone knows you add urine. Recycle/reuse, much like California from toilet to tap.
What are Arizona and Colorado? Chopped liver?
Besides, drinking urine will apparently postpone death from dehydration.
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Old 01-21-2022, 03:44 PM   #83
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Archoil AR6500. Before that AR6200. Available online at archoil.com, Amazon and ebay. Sometimes found at truck stops and diesel repair shops.
Detailed info at archoil.com
There are so many diesel additives out there and they pretty much all claim the same things. Hard to know what works vs. snake oil. I can't say I see a noticeable performance difference though I don't accurately track mpg regularly. I was using FPPF and also FuelOx. (I believe FPPF is endorsed by Yanmar. It's definitely recommended by Mack Boring)

Now I only buy ValvTect diesel as it alledgedly already has a good additive package and I use their BioGuard product for winter storage as they recommend. Other than that I don't normally use other additives, or if I do, I use them at a more diluted mixture when adding to ValvTect diesel.

https://www.valvtect.com/
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Old 01-21-2022, 03:45 PM   #84
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Not to be a Contrarian, but...

In the 1980s in Colorado I recall a couple diesel car owners who added a small percentage of gasoline to their vehicles to improve cold weather (20°F and below) starting. As overnight temps would approach -30°F in the mountains during the winter, this supposedly prevented gelling of the diesel fuel.

No personal experience with this, and certainly cannot recommend it. Plus, I don't think most bosters encounter these kinds of temperatures.
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Old 01-21-2022, 03:52 PM   #85
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Gasoline definitely does not like 16-17 to 1 compression ratio,, and becomes VERY volatile including total destruction of a diesel engine..>>>Dan
My Mazda with a 2.0 skyactive gasoline engine has a 14.0:1 compression ratio.
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Old 01-21-2022, 04:56 PM   #86
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My Mazda with a 2.0 skyactive gasoline engine has a 14.0:1 compression ratio.
I'm guessing that computer controlled sequential fuel injection helps a lot with that.
Racing spark ignition engines can run 14+:1 CR with alcohol fuel blended with nitro, too.
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Old 01-21-2022, 05:00 PM   #87
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Just say NO

Lurker here - with a dream of retirement whiles still keeping my feet wet.

While I do not have the wealth of experience with smaller Marine Engines, I have 40 years of sailing with large-slow speed (<150rpm) diesel engines as well as medium speed diesels (~750rpm).Now, having said that, petroleum expands at the same rate no matter how big the engine. Therefore, the piston linear speed is the same as a small engine.
Others have covered volatility of storage issues.
Mixing fuel is done, but with way more instrumentation than you would have. 'Normal' road diesel is 2.5 Cst (Centistokes) on the kinematic viscosity scale. At sea, our vessels ran residual fuel, heated to 280-f to obtain an ideal injection temp of 10~12 Cst on the low-speed main engine. The fuel is heated/regulated using a very sophisticated controller called a viscosimeter. It regulates the heating based on measured Viscosity in the fuel pipe being delivered to the engine.
So, again, diesel is 2.5 Cst, Gasoline is 0.88 or so. Kerosene is not so regulated and can be anywhere from 2.0~5Cst.

The fuel we were given to burn is anywhere from 380~500 Cst. 500CsT being about the consistency of road tar. Many times, a vendor will take road tar or some other 'residual fuel' and using "cutter stock" (diesel) mix it until in meets the spec that was ordered. So, I can personally attest that when you mix various grades and thicknesses of fuel and IT WILL separate in the storage tank, just like cream from raw milk. How long? Depends.
LUBRICITY - The main engines (130rpm) liked 13Cst. the Generators (750rpm) liked 8CsT. We had two Viscosimeters, one for main engine and one for the three generators. IF the operator did not get the viscosity correct, or controller failed, the fuel might get too thin, loose its lubricity from being too hot, and then the fuel pump plunger seizes within the barrel of the fuel injector. When this happens, the solid lifters below the injector have to LIFT something, and it is usually the whole injector that gets lifted off its mounts.
CETANE/OCTANE - Others have covered this well. Gasoline, even the higest octane is very explosive. So if it can get past the fuel pump, it could very well pressure-ignite in your injectors.
You would be far better off using lube oil cut with diesel than diesel cut with gas.
And yes, on the ships I worked on we 'recycled' the used lube oil into the fuel. But when you are burning 135tons of fuel a day, it might be a small percentage.
And just to make operations more interesting, changing from this heavy residual fuel (380~500/120c~150c) to regular Marine Diesel (2.5~4/ Ambient Temp) is problematic and has to be done each and every time a large ship enters (and wxits) a SECA (Sulfur Emissions Control Area) of which Europe and North America are now.

So... now you have some of the technical background.

To sum it up - Please do not do this.
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Old 01-21-2022, 05:38 PM   #88
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hfforeman, one hell of a 1st post. welcome to the forum
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Old 01-21-2022, 06:00 PM   #89
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hfforeman, one hell of a 1st post. welcome to the forum
I was just about to say the same thing Soo. For a lurker, that's a hell of a first post. Nicely done. Hope you will continue to contribute.
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Old 01-21-2022, 07:00 PM   #90
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Historically, there were farm tractors you would start on gasoline and then run it on diesel. Separate tanks.
But then during WWII, in Europe, there were trucks running on charcoal
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Old 01-21-2022, 07:33 PM   #91
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Historically, there were farm tractors you would start on gasoline and then run it on diesel. Separate tanks.
But then during WWII, in Europe, there were trucks running on charcoal
Yup, not unusual to see 2 different fuel tanks on an old tractor.
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Old 01-21-2022, 07:34 PM   #92
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This isn't exactly the same thing, and I was on a sailboat, but it involves short on fuel! An
article I wrote some years ago:


Untitled Document
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Old 01-21-2022, 07:40 PM   #93
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My Mazda with a 2.0 skyactive gasoline engine has a 14.0:1 compression ratio.
We`ve a Mazda with the 2.5L 170Kw gas(petrol) Skyactive engine. Yet to determine what the sky has to do with it.
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Old 01-21-2022, 08:14 PM   #94
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Putting Petrol Into A Diesel Car

Just for fun

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Old 01-21-2022, 08:20 PM   #95
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We`ve a Mazda with the 2.5L 170Kw gas(petrol) Skyactive engine. Yet to determine what the sky has to do with it.
The higher the compression, the greater the difference between Pmax and Pexh, thusly the higher the efficiency.

SkyActive is a sales term that is used to describe the type of variable Fuel injection and spark timing of their Gasoline engine. I believe it was invented by Bosch? In a high-compression engine, you want High Octane (originally tetra-ethyl lead) as the gasoline will compression-ignite before the piston reaches Top-Dead-Center. OCTANE 'booster' is some sort of chemical that is supposed to make the fuel LESS likely to explode at higher compressions. CETANE is just the opposite - a measure of the fuel to be MORE likely to compression ignite. That pre-detonation was what used to cause "ping" in high performance engines of the late 60's and early 70's. Or would keep your hot carbureted engine running after you turned off the key.

My wife had a' 92 Volvo 4-cyl turbo with one of the new types of Bosch fuel/engine control modules. The research was, that if you had a bad load of fuel, the anti-knock sensor (Two on a 6-cyl) would vary the timing of injections on each individual cylinder at hundreds of times/second.

The new Tier-III & Tier-IV Diesel engines accomplish staying 'below the NOx curves' using this same sort of programming. Poking around with the ECM parameters takes some specific software from engine maker. Welcome to the computer age.

One time when I was at Caterpillar school (97), they were experimenting with feeding large gen-sets with methane swamp gas from old landfills (those upright pipes you see?). anyway, the dirty gas certainly coked up the engines, but they were making so much money selling the power that they just bought a new engine every so often.

Original Diesel engines were run on Coal Oil, Coal Dust, or peanut oil.
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Old 01-21-2022, 08:42 PM   #96
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Been running gensets off landfill gas for a decade or so in Southern Nj....

CMCMUA Electrical Generating Station
In 2013, CMCMUA installed three (3) Jenbacher JMS 320 Electrical Generating Engines at the Secure Sanitary Landfill in Woodbine, New Jersey. Each of these three generators is capable of producing 1.0 megawatts of electricity per hour using the LFG as the sole source of fuel. The electricity is used to supply all the electrical needs of the entire Environmental Complex including the landfill, gas management system, recycling center, scale house, and maintenance facility. All excess electricity generated that is not needed by the Environmental Complex is sold to the PJM grid. Throughout 2018, all of the electrical needs of the facility were met and more than 8,260 Megawatts of electricity was sold to PJM.
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Old 01-21-2022, 08:54 PM   #97
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Historically, there were farm tractors you would start on gasoline and then run it on diesel. Separate tanks.
But then during WWII, in Europe, there were trucks running on charcoal
The guy who did my excavation when I built in 2001 used a very old CAT bulldozer that started on gas, then switched to diesel.. The gas was used in a small gas engine attached directly to the diesel engine, got it turning over, then the diesel was turned on and it ran on diesel. The gas part was then turned off.
NO MIXING.
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Old 01-21-2022, 09:06 PM   #98
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My neighbor and golfing buddy was in Italy and needed fuel to get to the airport in his rental car. They directed him to the wrong fuel and he put half a tank of gasoline in a diesel automobile. Drove offf, car started “knocking”.. he turned around and drove back to the fuel station. They tried to wave him off as the engine compartment was smoking.
Pulled into the station and the car burned to the ground. Barely got his wife’s purse out. Lost all their luggage.
He basically had to buy the car as “negligence was not covered.
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Old 01-21-2022, 09:44 PM   #99
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The guy who did my excavation when I built in 2001 used a very old CAT bulldozer that started on gas, then switched to diesel.. The gas was used in a small gas engine attached directly to the diesel engine, got it turning over, then the diesel was turned on and it ran on diesel. The gas part was then turned off.
NO MIXING.

Keith, Just trivia, but the small gasoline gasoline engines used to start larger diesel engines are generally referred to as "Pony motors"! I'm just FULL of useless trivia . . .
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Old 01-21-2022, 11:06 PM   #100
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So the OP's scenario starts with "sprang a leak". 100 gal diesel lost. Lost to ocean, or lake or river.... Depending on where he is, he may well wish that his engines do blow up and take him out as well !!

Its simple: if you have any doubts about the integrity of your fuel tanks, don't fill them. Get them inspected /tested. Get them repaired or replaced if required. Do not untie from the dock. Do not start on a long voyage....

Ok, so you ignore all that. Plan A is to slow down. If you travel slower you get more mpg. If you travel very slowly with your remaining 100 gallons, you will get there!

Adding gas to the diesel tank instead? Thanks for all the laughs folks, brightened up my dull rainy day stuck at the marina waiting for repairs (to my RIB, not fuel tanks!).
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