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Old 10-28-2021, 12:52 PM   #1
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Smile Recommended Makes 30-40 Feet

Hi All -



Just to open up a big subject, what are some recommended manufacturers? Some to stay away from? I imagine this has been asked before, so in the alternative, just point me to the thread. Cheers!



Mostly interested in:


FG hull, preferably solid
2 Cabins
1 Engine (diesel)
1 or 2 Heads
$150K and under (better still, under $100K)


Interested in avoiding:


Problem makes - leaky this or that, delaminations, Junk Parts

Handling that would embarrass a drunk pig
Narrow Boats


Ones that have caught my eye:


Grand Banks
Mainship
Marine Trader
Camino
Monk
Kadey Krogen
Nordic


Use:


Intercoastal
Lakes
Coastal Cruising


Currently I'm in Floridaze.
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Old 10-28-2021, 01:20 PM   #2
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I think you need to narrow down your "requirements" section, and then have a "nice to have" section. As stated alot of boats will fit into what you describe. I'd leave the price out of it for now, until you pick the boat. Price usually goes with the age/hours/condition, which you consider once you have down selected to like 3 different models.
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Old 10-28-2021, 01:51 PM   #3
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I think the older you go, (and at $100-150k, you're looking at 20+ years old) brand becomes less of an indicator of quality, and your only option is to become a very educated consumer and trust your surveyor.

I'm going to use car brands so I don't accidentally insult anyone's boat.

A Rolls Royce is a far better car than a Chevy, but if your budget is $20k, you will be better off with a Chevy at that price than a Rolls.

A range of 30-40 feet is pretty big. A 30 foot boat for $100k is going to be nicer than a 40 foot boat at that same price.

Even if Brand X > Brand Y, a papmered Y is better than a neglected X. Price is going to be an algorithm of age, size, care and brand. Unless you are buying a new or close to new boat I think the other variables are more significant than brand.
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Old 10-28-2021, 02:02 PM   #4
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The advice above is very relevant. Additionally I would recommend not focusing on brand names at all and searching the yacht listing sites using the advanced search and the wish list of attributes you already have. Condition will vary drastically on a boat 10+ years old and how they were maintained is just as significant of a factor compared to how well they were made in the first place.

Focusing on specific brands and models recommended here or elsewhere may cause you to overlook some very good values in lesser known or smaller manufacturers. Search by the features you want and then research the models that come up in your search here on on owners forums to find out about handling characteristics, build quality etc.
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Old 10-28-2021, 04:51 PM   #5
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Welcome, Per your post and my opinion only. Take notice to the many great members here as they are more knowledgeable than me. Good luck!

Grand Banks $$$
Mainship *
Marine Trader*
Camino
Monk $$
Kadey Krogen $$$
Nordic $$$
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Old 10-29-2021, 08:18 AM   #6
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Asteriks

Hi-


What does your * mean?


Thank you for some usable input!
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Old 10-29-2021, 08:35 AM   #7
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Hello All,


I understand the older and bigger the more costly, all being equal. I further understand a rotting corpse of a boat costs less to buy than a pristine example.


The question remains:


What are opinions as to GENERAL quality of these makes (or others) assuming a solid example?


I've seen many opinions of SOME NOT ALL Taiwan boats are problematic. That is, they have leaky bits and therefore rot. Others are known for inadequate fittings, at least by some people. Other makes from Taiwan, however, are considered top shelf.



So, with that in mind, what are your opinions of the makes in the OP? To add some specificity:


Grand Banks Classic 34
Camino 31
Mainship 34
Monk 36
Kadey Krogen Manatee 36
Nordic 32


All are available from 1980 onward.
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Old 10-29-2021, 09:05 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nihikaikid View Post
Hello All,


I understand the older and bigger the more costly, all being equal. I further understand a rotting corpse of a boat costs less to buy than a pristine example.


The question remains:


What are opinions as to GENERAL quality of these makes (or others) assuming a solid example?


I've seen many opinions of SOME NOT ALL Taiwan boats are problematic. That is, they have leaky bits and therefore rot. Others are known for inadequate fittings, at least by some people. Other makes from Taiwan, however, are considered top shelf.



So, with that in mind, what are your opinions of the makes in the OP? To add some specificity:


Grand Banks Classic 34
Camino 31
Mainship 34
Monk 36
Kadey Krogen Manatee 36
Nordic 32


All are available from 1980 onward.
I think people can answer those questions but I'm a bit confused about your original requirements as at least half of the boats you listed are single stateroom boats. Are you flexible on that requirement or by 2 cabins are you including the salon with a pullout or futon as another acceptable option for you. Just curious to avoid wasted effort.
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Old 10-29-2021, 09:15 AM   #9
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Don't know that there is a heck of a lot of difference. They are all slow boats that don't handle beam or following seas that well. Better to look for examples that have the feature you want. Is there an inverter? Are the electronics up to date? Single with bow thruster or twins? On and on.
We have an Albin 40 1986. Some minor leaks but a solid dependable boat. Our only wish is stabilizers for our trips over open water. My $.02, but go with the nicest boat you can find for your budget regardless of brand.
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Old 10-29-2021, 09:30 AM   #10
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In addition to condition, many models change over model years. So there may be features and construction differences. Occasionally you will find boats with odd ball engines. Went and looked for a friend at a Grand Banks. The engines were only produced for a couple of years. No parts other than routine maintenance items, were available any longer. So you can decide you like a Grand Banks in a certain size, but you also need to know that some should be avoided because of engine model.

Ted
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Old 10-29-2021, 09:55 AM   #11
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Agreed, you need to decide on the FEATURES you want and look at boats with those features.


Most of your choices will be older boats, so there's an argument to look at condition and upkeep. It would be great to find one that the owner rebuilt and did a good job and is selling and moving up. You "may" find a later Mainship or Camano in your price range, and would be my first choice.



Twins on this sized boat would most likely be tight. If you can live with that, fine.



Things like electronics, inverters, galley stuff, can be added. I'd argue strongly that your biggest requirement be a solid hull and a good engine. Generator would be high on the list, too.


Also, put the Albin on your list, too. Good boats.
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Old 10-29-2021, 10:00 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gdavid View Post
I think people can answer those questions but I'm a bit confused about your original requirements as at least half of the boats you listed are single stateroom boats. Are you flexible on that requirement or by 2 cabins are you including the salon with a pullout or futon as another acceptable option for you. Just curious to avoid wasted effort.
Ah! Good point.


2 is ideal, but willing to have one.


Old saying I only recently heard, 'The ideal boat has room for 8 for drinks, 4 for dinner, and 2 for overnight.'


Will modify OP if I can.


Cheers.
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Old 10-29-2021, 10:03 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by O C Diver View Post
In addition to condition, many models change over model years. So there may be features and construction differences. Occasionally you will find boats with odd ball engines. Went and looked for a friend at a Grand Banks. The engines were only produced for a couple of years. No parts other than routine maintenance items, were available any longer. So you can decide you like a Grand Banks in a certain size, but you also need to know that some should be avoided because of engine model.

Ted



Excellent tip. Thanks
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Old 10-29-2021, 10:06 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by Seevee View Post
Agreed, you need to decide on the FEATURES you want and look at boats with those features.


Most of your choices will be older boats, so there's an argument to look at condition and upkeep. It would be great to find one that the owner rebuilt and did a good job and is selling and moving up. You "may" find a later Mainship or Camano in your price range, and would be my first choice.



Twins on this sized boat would most likely be tight. If you can live with that, fine.



Things like electronics, inverters, galley stuff, can be added. I'd argue strongly that your biggest requirement be a solid hull and a good engine. Generator would be high on the list, too.


Also, put the Albin on your list, too. Good boats.

Thanks for that.



Yes, I'm assuming single engine. I know the benefits of 2, but I'm more keen on 1 for a few reasons.



How about your experiences with your Mainship?
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Old 10-29-2021, 11:46 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nihikaikid View Post
Hi All -



Just to open up a big subject, what are some recommended manufacturers? Some to stay away from? I imagine this has been asked before, so in the alternative, just point me to the thread. Cheers!



Mostly interested in:


FG hull, preferably solid
2 Cabins
1 Engine (diesel)
1 or 2 Heads
$150K and under (better still, under $100K)


Interested in avoiding:


Problem makes - leaky this or that, delaminations, Junk Parts

Handling that would embarrass a drunk pig
Narrow Boats


Ones that have caught my eye:


Grand Banks
Mainship
Marine Trader
Camino
Monk
Kadey Krogen
Nordic


Use:


Intercoastal
Lakes
Coastal Cruising


Currently I'm in Floridaze.
General comments:
Personally I like the Nordic Tugs (don't forget the American Tug 34 as well), the Monk 36, and the Camano Troll best of the boats you listed.

However, no matter the boat (brand) you end up with, it will be an older boat in the price range you suggest. Therefore, as others have said, condition of that particular boat will be THE most important factor in determining your ongoing expenses with your boat. Find a boat that has been very, very well maintained (even loved) and your budget will thank you. Even at that, ensure that you have a fairly large annual budget for normal boating expenses such as moorage, insurance, and routine maintenance (oil changes, impeller changes, filter changes, etc.) but also plan on an uneven flow of expenses (meaning differs each year) for repairs, larger maintenance items (like cooling system, shaft seals, cutlass bearings, etc. etc.), replacement of old equipment, and just general updates and improvements. For example, when we bought Pilitak, our Nordic Tug 37 (and it was in very good condition and had been well maintained), we spent an additional $40,000 in the first couple of years (total, not each year) to repair a few items found in the survey, and to improve a few things to our situation. We still had almost 20 year old electronics so could easily have spent much more!
One way to keep these expenses as low as possible (besides the very important first step of getting a boat in great condition) is to learn to do as much of this work yourself as you can. Labour costs add up in a big hurry.
I mention these things because a lot of "newbies" to these types of boats (with many systems) don't think of this when they "fall in love" with the "new boat".
As far as what brand/model, I suggest making lists of your important features in a boat based on how you plan to use the boat and your personal preferences.

Must haves (no room for compromise), nice to have (compromise possible), and do not want (will not buy a boat with these features).
For example, for me, some do not wants were: screwed down teak decks (leaks, maintenance issues, hundreds of holes in the deck,etc.), exterior woodwork (too much maintenance), twin engines (cramped ER in these size boats, double the maintenance and costs for repairs), etc.
You have already listed some must and nice to haves, but I suggest ensuring you know which are which will help with your decision.
As Ted mentioned (and I concur) you might want to investigate the engine brand/model before the final decision. For example, the Cummins 6BTA and it's various sub models has a great overall reputation, is one of the most widely used engines out there, parts are readily available (for somewhat reasonable prices), and most any diesel mechanic knows these engines. Using that Cummins as the example to look at the issue from the opposite side as Ted already described.
Anyway, good luck with your hunt!
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Old 10-29-2021, 01:34 PM   #16
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I own an 18-year-old 42 foot Nordic Tug which has all of your list of desired features. However, even at that age, you are looking at 300K plus. I love this boat, by the way!

Yes, even a boat that’s in very good condition will cost quite a bit in the first few years as you get it the way you want it to be.

I really can recommend any of the Nordic Tug models. If you are buying in the Pacific NW, they go for premium prices. You might do better looking at these or other trawlers on the east coast…
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Old 10-29-2021, 03:30 PM   #17
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Welcome aboard. In the age you will be looking at, due to the price, condition will be much more important than brand of boat. A well maintained Taiwan boat will be a better deal than a “quality “ name brand boat that has not been maintained. All of the brands you listed have all of the problems you say you want to avoid. It all depends on how the boat was taken care of. First you need to define what your needs are and then your like to haves. Then find a boat model or 2 that meets your needs. Then search for one of those in good condition. It may end up coming down on sacrificing some of the wants and needs in order to get a good condition boat, especially in today’s market. Then expect to drop a small fortune on the boat fixing what was missed by you and the surveyor. There are always things missed…
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Old 11-05-2021, 12:40 PM   #18
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recommend willard to the list

willard trawlers
available in 30, 36,& 40 (:
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Old 11-05-2021, 01:31 PM   #19
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30 to 40 feet is a big swing. Remember that boats are three dimensional objects. To illustrate the difference, try cubing a number. 3 x 3 x 3 = 27. 4 x 4 x 4 = 64. See what I mean? Displacement increases dramatically with LOA as do operating expenses.

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Old 11-05-2021, 02:57 PM   #20
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Lots of people put focus on "must haves". That's not a bad sentiment.

But over the years I've found it's often just as important (if not more so) to have a list of "crap I never want to put up with again".

Get a list going of "all the little things" that turned out to be more annoying than expected. Make sure they're nowhere near the top of the list of items on your resulting selections.

Balance between "must have" fantasies and "oh hell no" realities.
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