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Old 08-04-2020, 02:41 PM   #1
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Recommendation for Replacement Electric Oven-Stove

I have a 1984 Grand Banks trawler with a vintage Seaward Products - 33 electric 3-burner stove and oven that still works but not so great. My wife loves to cook and she hates it. It runs on 110 v and the cut-out size is about 20 3/8" by 21 3/4" high and 21 " deep. I'd like to replace it without having to redo the cabinetry if possible. Looking thru Defender I'm not seeing a sure good replacement so this is a request for suggestions from anyone who has been thru this already. Thank you in advance.
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Old 08-04-2020, 03:30 PM   #2
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Are you staying with electric or switching to gas?
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Old 08-04-2020, 03:43 PM   #3
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If your staying with electric have look at the Force10 65335 3 Burner Electric Galley Range, 120 Volt dimensions are very close.
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Old 08-04-2020, 05:22 PM   #4
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Re: staying with electric or switching to gas. Actually my wife prefers gas. From a safety standpoint, is there evidence to support gas being as safe as electrical on a boat?


For the electric model call out that fits the cut out size, thanks!
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Old 08-04-2020, 06:07 PM   #5
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I have a Force 10 electric 3 burner and oven. Fits in the same space as the Princess.
Oven still runs hot.
Someone here recommended the “AirBake” cookie sheets. That cured the bottom burned biscuits and cookies.
Can’t help you with the gas. I don’t want gas stove on the boat. Just my opinion/selection.
I do have a gas grill hanging off the back of the boat.
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Old 08-04-2020, 06:15 PM   #6
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Have a force 10 3 burner gas range with oven. No issues and works well.
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Old 08-04-2020, 06:35 PM   #7
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Now that propane may be on the table I'll give my opinion. I think either electrical or propane systems can be dangerous if not done correctly. Sure, a propane explosion is obvious, but what about electrical connections heating up due to resistance, etc.?

Of course since you already have an electrical system on your boat, you could say that propane is adding a risk. And it is, but even though I'm a bit of a worrywart, I don't worry unduly about a properly installed propane system (ABYC followed to the letter, basically). A big plus is if your boat has a place for a proper locker. I think GB's usually have the tank, etc. in a flybridge seat base (not sure how they vent that?).

I vastly prefer to cook with gas, and that doesn't even count the fact that one may have to run a generator to cook with electric.

I guess to me it comes down to, if you are going to worry about it despite a proper installation then don't do it. Recreational boating is supposed to be fun. But also know that a correctly installed system has checks and balances designed to keep it from going boom.

I've mostly used Force 10 propane ranges so I know what I like about them but can't compare to others. I would say the oven is a tad weak on btu's, but I still manage to make pizza. Pretty much everything else about them I really like. Design, look, function (door tucks under, etc.). They also come in like six sizes in each burner number, IIRC. e.g. North American Standard, North American Compact, European Standard, European Compact, European Sub-Compact, etc.

A few of the sizes have pre-made trim kits for non-gimballed mounting (I know North American standard does, but not all I don't think?).

Sure Marine in Seattle shows them on their website if you want to have a gander. (Last I checked it was easier to look there than on Force 10's own website.)
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Old 08-04-2020, 07:21 PM   #8
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We're full time livaboards and stay on the hook slot. Gas for is us was the best option. If you're gonna be at a marina most of the time I'd go with electric.
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Old 08-04-2020, 08:28 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JESSEDIVER49 View Post
Re: staying with electric or switching to gas. Actually my wife prefers gas. From a safety standpoint, is there evidence to support gas being as safe as electrical on a boat?


For the electric model call out that fits the cut out size, thanks!
We just finished a month long cruise, spending most nights at anchor, with a GB42 as our companion. It is a 1975 classic, equipped with electric galley. Its owner complained daily about having to run the genset to make coffee, and used the BBQ for most cooking, so as to not have the gen on at dinner time.
We use propane for most summer cooking, diesel stove for cooler weather. We made coffee for our friend frequently.
In the course of the trip, we explored the possibility of converting the GB to propane. If yours is anything like the 1975 classic, it shouldn't be difficult. Either the front under the dash, or if you used lower profile (more expensive) 10 to 20 lb tanks, you could give up a seat locker to the tank storage. Putting in an overboard vent is relatively easy in either location. Running the hose without seeing it is not so easy, unless you are good with DIY woodwork and can fit some wood covers to hide the hose, it may create a focal point that you won't like. The stoves are the same dimensions as most existing electric, so no issues there. For safety, all you need is a solenoid at the tank and a sniffer at or below floor level.
Propane is perfectly quiet, hot for cooking, safe if your installation is properly done. The only downside is that when closed up for cruddy weather, propane cooking creates a lot of moisture in the air, so where it can condense, on windows mostly, you get lots of dripping. If you can keep good ventilation open it is never a concern.
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Old 08-04-2020, 10:16 PM   #10
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Not sure about your vintage , but our 1998 36 classic was 110v cooking also but careful inspections showed the Pt Flybridge seat locker was Factory built as a propane locker including overboard vent. There was a blank in the galley for the overhead propane solenoid. So could have been an easy conversion.

That said, we usually needed to run the generator each evening to cool the boat with AC for an hour or two so cooking dinner was not an issue. A medium house bank ‘& inverter/inverter/charger Gets you silent morning coffee.
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Old 08-05-2020, 05:41 AM   #11
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If you're having to rebuild the cabinet, etc. and are staying electric, DO consider an induction stovetop. We changed our "conventional" glass stovetop for a Dometic induction stovetop about 6 years ago. Induction is safer, more efficient and seems a bit closer to cooking with gas in terms of responsiveness.
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Old 08-05-2020, 06:06 AM   #12
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We just finished a month long cruise, spending most nights at anchor, with a GB42 as our companion. It is a 1975 classic, equipped with electric galley. Its owner complained daily about having to run the genset to make coffee, and used the BBQ for most cooking, so as to not have the gen on at dinner time.

An inverter -- assuming sufficient battery capacity -- could have been an easy solution for that. Solves heating hors d' oeuvres at Happy Hour, too.

We found it useful to often run the genset for dinner anyway, not just to cook but also to heat water, charge batteries, etc.

-Chris
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Old 08-05-2020, 06:58 AM   #13
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If you're having to rebuild the cabinet, etc. and are staying electric, DO consider an induction stovetop. We changed our "conventional" glass stovetop for a Dometic induction stovetop about 6 years ago. Induction is safer, more efficient and seems a bit closer to cooking with gas in terms of responsiveness.
I am interested in your induction stove top. What brand and model do you have?
What is the amperage draw? What voltage?
What do you do for an oven? Brand and model and amperage draw. What voltage?
I looked at their site and no mention of an induction cook top for RV/Marine usage which leads me to believe, all the cook tops are 240vt. That pretty much lets me out. I think with my 8kw generator, for me it is back to 120vt stove/oven. Ah, forgot. The AT34 are 30 amp boats.
Thanks!!
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Old 08-05-2020, 07:17 AM   #14
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I'm also in the all electric cooking camp. And I also find it useful to run the generator for breakfast / coffee and then again for dinner (usually plan to not need it for lunch). That reheats the hot water, throws a few amps into the batteries, etc.
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Old 08-05-2020, 09:22 AM   #15
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I am interested in your induction stove top. What brand and model do you have?
What is the amperage draw? What voltage?
What do you do for an oven? Brand and model and amperage draw. What voltage?
I looked at their site and no mention of an induction cook top for RV/Marine usage which leads me to believe, all the cook tops are 240vt. That pretty much lets me out. I think with my 8kw generator, for me it is back to 120vt stove/oven. Ah, forgot. The AT34 are 30 amp boats.
Thanks!!
Hi OldDan1943,

Looking around a bit online, it seems that Dometic induction stoves are not available globally(??).

Though, I did find this info relevant to North America

https://www.campingworld.com/dometic...op-107853.html (120V)

https://www.dometic.com/en-us/us/new...uction-cooktop

For what it's worth my Dometic stove is a 2-burner, model PI7602. 230v, with one 1400w burner and one 2300w burner. I have uploaded a photo of the 2012 Swedish Dometic catalogue page. At least the technical specifications will be readable for you. Maybe you can ask a local Dometic rep, with the help of this page/model number and let them do the legwork internally to see if this is (or the equivalent) is available anywhere in North America. I find Dometic's product offering and marketing strategy inconsistent and incomprehensible, in many respects. Probably because they are such a large company composed of many acquired (but not fully integrated) small companies.

As for my "oven"... It's a Sharp 230v microwave/convection/oven combination with broiler grill. I can only run the broiler grill when on shore power, however, as my inverter can't handle it...and even then, I sometimes have to use my inverter in "power assist" mode to help the shore power. This is the oven that came with the boat from the manufacturer.
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Old 08-05-2020, 10:00 AM   #16
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Hi OldDan1943,

Looking around a bit online, it seems that Dometic induction stoves are not available globally(??).

Though, I did find this info relevant to North America

https://www.campingworld.com/dometic...op-107853.html (120V)

https://www.dometic.com/en-us/us/new...uction-cooktop

For what it's worth my Dometic stove is a 2-burner, model PI7602. 230v, with one 1400w burner and one 2300w burner. I have uploaded a photo of the 2012 Swedish Dometic catalogue page. At least the technical specifications will be readable for you. Maybe you can ask a local Dometic rep, with the help of this page/model number and let them do the legwork internally to see if this is (or the equivalent) is available anywhere in North America. I find Dometic's product offering and marketing strategy inconsistent and incomprehensible, in many respects. Probably because they are such a large company composed of many acquired (but not fully integrated) small companies.

As for my "oven"... It's a Sharp 230v microwave/convection/oven combination with broiler grill. I can only run the broiler grill when on shore power, however, as my inverter can't handle it...and even then, I sometimes have to use my inverter in "power assist" mode to help the shore power. This is the oven that came with the boat from the manufacturer.
Scott, there lies the problem..... 230vt and the amperage.
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Old 08-05-2020, 10:09 AM   #17
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Scott, there lies the problem..... 230vt and the amperage.

This one was 120v, though...
https://www.campingworld.com/dometic...op-107853.html (120V)
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Old 08-05-2020, 12:57 PM   #18
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Is propane dangerous? It's probably as dangerous as anything else. Until very recently, all RV's had propane stove/oven, we are talking millions of units. Now throw in the numbers for all boats using propane and you have a very high number. And again until recently, RV fridges could be run off of propane, three way fridges. I ran a number of RV fridges off of propane. Now we are adding more millions of units to the above when you include the propane fridges. So yes propane is safe. The great majority of boat fires are electrical.

Heck in our first RV trailer we had a propane light inside the unit.
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Old 08-05-2020, 01:02 PM   #19
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Propane in an RV is a bit different. Propane is heavier than air, so it's easier to have it accumulate in a boat than an RV. Heck, even on a gas powered boat, propane sketches me out a little. Liquid flammable stuff is bad enough. Pressurized flammable stuff is worse.
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Old 08-05-2020, 01:16 PM   #20
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Agree with rslifkin. I have had propane on boats (and plan to again), and also in RV's. RV's are child's play in comparison. There is no bilge. Most joints are outdoors. Smell a leak? Step outside and run away. It's "permissible" (and normal) to leave the propane on 24/7, which allows things like propane refrigerators* and water heaters (also, their "burners" are essentially outdoors in compartments sealed from the indoors and with outside grilles).

Granted, in a proper boat installation you don't have pipe joints "indoors" (except at appliance obviously). And if you stick to ABYC it's designed to be safe as fuel can be. But still it's different. You have a bilge; you turn propane off when not in use (or at least I do), so no appliances that come on and off by themselves at odd times (refrigerators, water heaters). Most boats aren't large enough to have "grilles" on the side of the hull for burnered appliances. There's just more to be careful of, and the consequences can be higher (hard to run away if there is a problem).

I have heard of boats with propane refrigerators, and I see that Sure Marine sells Propex propane furnaces; but for me I'm content with using it for cooking, which is a job it does well and for which you only need to turn on the system when using it.

It also lasts a very long time when only using it for cooking, which is good because it's a minor pain to re-fill. As an example, I had two 11# tanks on a boat on passage (mentioning that because cooking was basically the entertainment of the day when at sea).

We made endless cups of tea, cooked breakfast and dinner every day (including long-cook stews and such), and baked nearly every day (bread/cookies/cookies, bread, etc.) At the end of two months we had just finished off one of the tanks. So even on that intensive program, a typical 20# tank would have lasted nearly four months (I would not normally cook and bake that much when aboard, either).

Frosty

*Although I'm not a fan of RV absorption refrigerators due to what I consider a poor design, but it's not really propane's fault.
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