Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 12-05-2018, 01:53 PM   #61
Senior Member
 
BIG CAT's Avatar
 
City: Kiln,MS
Country: USA
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 457
fyi



Click image for larger version

Name:	oil.jpg
Views:	51
Size:	97.2 KB
ID:	83246
__________________
Advertisement

BIG CAT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2018, 02:20 PM   #62
Senior Member
 
BIG CAT's Avatar
 
City: Kiln,MS
Country: USA
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 457
this is from a large bore engine so the normal operating psi maybe lower than the 9 psi stated. but the 15psi number for filter replacement is still good.

Click image for larger version

Name:	oil1.jpg
Views:	35
Size:	111.2 KB
ID:	83247
__________________

BIG CAT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2018, 02:28 PM   #63
Grand Vizier
 
Delfin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 3,457
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIG CAT View Post
Does that dipstick have engine running at idle markings on the other side?
__________________
Delfin
"Dad always thought laughter was the best medicine, which I guess is why several of us died of tuberculosis." - Jack Handy
Delfin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2018, 02:33 PM   #64
Grand Vizier
 
Delfin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 3,457
Quote:
Originally Posted by Northern Spy View Post
I just spent a bit of time on the Puradyne website. Not a lot of technical info there, but that is often the case.

It is definitely a depth filter.

It is recommended to change the filter, as you do, periodically as you change engine oil. I couldn't find any specifications or charts.

The filter element lives an easy short life.

No different from any other filter company, the profit is in the replacement element.

In industry, where filtration is critical, and can be tied to production losses, a bit more oversight is taken. Lube mechanics and on-site tribology labs are normal. Particularly when you are consuming tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars annually on element costs. So we wring as much out of a filter as possible to save money. Daily DP measurements are made if they aren't on-line and alarmed.

We would cut filters open and you could see how the fluid would find or make a widen section in the media. It doesn't have to be much as all it has to do is channel the flow which allows a decrease in pressure and increase in velocity. Sometimes they would be bulged and the relief path would be around the circumference of the filter.

In your case, as long as it provides good service (which I am pretty confident it does), and it isn't excessively costly, why mess with a good thing? Keep doing what you are doing.

There is a very good chance that you could go multitudes of oil changes before doing a filter change.

But you can't control what you don't measure. So with out oil analysis, or pressure differential and manufacture's recommendations, you're kind of guessing.

Next oil change, I'd cut one open with a sawzall and take a look at it.

Then I'd skip an oil change and do it again.

If possible I would consider a dp gauge, and correlate with observations, or call the company and ask for some technical info. Keep in mind, they really don't want you to extend your element life.

My gut feel is that if you put a DP gauge on it with a new filter element, it would take a long time to see it move a noticeable amount.

Again, as this is not your primary filter, the risk of failure, is identical to not having the filter at all.
Interesting on the channeling, and I guess I can visualize that happening. Assuming channeling occurs, that would mess up a DP measure, would it not? I will cut one of these apart next year to see what is going on.
__________________
Delfin
"Dad always thought laughter was the best medicine, which I guess is why several of us died of tuberculosis." - Jack Handy
Delfin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2018, 03:33 PM   #65
Senior Member
 
BIG CAT's Avatar
 
City: Kiln,MS
Country: USA
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 457
Quote:
Originally Posted by Delfin View Post
Does that dipstick have engine running at idle markings on the other side?

That's straight from the 3306(84z) marine engine operation and maintenance section.
BIG CAT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2018, 04:07 PM   #66
Grand Vizier
 
Delfin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 3,457
Quote:
Originally Posted by BIG CAT View Post
That's straight from the 3306(84z) marine engine operation and maintenance section.
Ah yes, page 63. Interesting that when the bypass filter is isolated by closing the valve I installed at the filter on the drain line that the oil level marker when idling will show not quite full, but with the engine off and well drained, the oil level is just slightly high of the full Mark. Presumably because of a slight inclination of the engine...
Delfin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-05-2018, 04:45 PM   #67
Senior Member
 
BIG CAT's Avatar
 
City: Kiln,MS
Country: USA
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 457
Quote:
Originally Posted by Delfin View Post
Ah yes, page 63. Interesting that when the bypass filter is isolated by closing the valve I installed at the filter on the drain line that the oil level marker when idling will show not quite full, but with the engine off and well drained, the oil level is just slightly high of the full Mark. Presumably because of a slight inclination of the engine...

you are right about the angle. most of the new engine come with blank dip sticks. they are marked at the dealer or boat yard to match the installed engine angle. also 3306 can be a bit a pain to get a consistent level reading due to the way the dip stick tube is made. lol i generally stick it and wait 5is seconds before pulling it to check.
BIG CAT is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2018, 10:09 AM   #68
Guru
 
City: Tampa, FL
Country: USA
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by garycasey View Post
The fill level was set by the manufacturer assuming the engine is shut off, not running.
THIS^^^^^ EXACTLY!


Every engine out there has less oil in the sump when it is running than it has when it is off and has cooled down. And every engine manufacturer out there designs their engines with the intention that the oil level is measured when the engine is off and has cooled down. That means that -- BY DESIGN! -- the oil level should be "low" if you measure it while the engine is running.


Now, is the OPs too low? That's a different question. Is the oil filter that he is using the same type as the engine's designers intended to be used with it? if so, then the answer is probably, no, it is not too low. If this filter holds more oil than the type that the engine's designers had originally intended, then maybe, yes.


So, were I the OP, I would not be wondering if I should over-fill my crankcase. I would be wondering if I should switch to a type of oil filter that matches what the engine's designers intended it to have.
denverd0n is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-06-2018, 10:35 AM   #69
Grand Vizier
 
Delfin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 3,457
Quote:
Originally Posted by denverd0n View Post
THIS^^^^^ EXACTLY!


Every engine out there has less oil in the sump when it is running than it has when it is off and has cooled down. And every engine manufacturer out there designs their engines with the intention that the oil level is measured when the engine is off and has cooled down. That means that -- BY DESIGN! -- the oil level should be "low" if you measure it while the engine is running.


Now, is the OPs too low? That's a different question. Is the oil filter that he is using the same type as the engine's designers intended to be used with it? if so, then the answer is probably, no, it is not too low. If this filter holds more oil than the type that the engine's designers had originally intended, then maybe, yes.


So, were I the OP, I would not be wondering if I should over-fill my crankcase. I would be wondering if I should switch to a type of oil filter that matches what the engine's designers intended it to have.
I think you may have lost the plot on the whole bypass filter thingie....

The engine has the OEM filter. It also has a bypass filter that removes carbon particles down to 1 micron, supplementing the filtration of the OEM filter, which I believe is targeted to particles in the 10-30 micron range.

The dipstick has markings for both running and at rest. CAT apparently put the running markings on the dipstick because they think they are useful, and as noted above by Mr. Sky who knows his stuff, diesel wise, what matters is the engine oil level when running, not when sitting and not needing lubrication. Perhaps CAT agrees.

On reflection, I think the slight discrepancy between running engine oil level and stopped and drained oil level is the best slight inclination of the engine.
Delfin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2018, 08:41 AM   #70
Guru
 
City: Tampa, FL
Country: USA
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 538
Quote:
Originally Posted by Delfin View Post
The dipstick has markings for both running and at rest.
My mistake. You are right. I did not read every post in the thread, and not having owned a CAT in the past I did not realize they had both running and at rest markings on the dipstick. No engine that I've ever owned in the past -- gasoline or diesel -- had markings on the dipstick for when the engine is running.


So, of course, if your dipstick has markings for when the engine is running, those would be the more important ones to focus on.
denverd0n is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2018, 10:10 AM   #71
Grand Vizier
 
Delfin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 3,457
Quote:
Originally Posted by denverd0n View Post
My mistake. You are right. I did not read every post in the thread, and not having owned a CAT in the past I did not realize they had both running and at rest markings on the dipstick. No engine that I've ever owned in the past -- gasoline or diesel -- had markings on the dipstick for when the engine is running.


So, of course, if your dipstick has markings for when the engine is running, those would be the more important ones to focus on.
Perhaps they mark it both sides because it is a marine engine and they presume some angle of installation. Beats me, but thank you.
Delfin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2018, 12:33 PM   #72
Technical Guru
 
Ski in NC's Avatar
 
City: Wilmington, NC
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Louisa
Vessel Model: Custom Built 38
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 5,838
They put an "engine running" set of marks on the stick as these engines are often used in continuous run applications where you may need to add oil and would rather not shut it down. You can add oil while it is running.

Nice feature, use it to your advantage. Note: Oil needs to be pretty much warmed up or you get a false reading.

If stick is near center of engine block (around cyl #3 and 4, the angle should not matter too much. Where is stick?

Oil level is not that critical. Can't be too low, can't be too high, but there is a lot of room in between the two cases, and sticks are marked with a lot of cushion either way.

Don't over think this.
Ski in NC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2018, 12:45 PM   #73
Grand Vizier
 
Delfin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 3,457
[ATTACH]Attachment 83294[/ATTACH]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ski in NC View Post
They put an "engine running" set of marks on the stick as these engines are often used in continuous run applications where you may need to add oil and would rather not shut it down. You can add oil while it is running.

Nice feature, use it to your advantage. Note: Oil needs to be pretty much warmed up or you get a false reading.

If stick is near center of engine block (around cyl #3 and 4, the angle should not matter too much. Where is stick?

Oil level is not that critical. Can't be too low, can't be too high, but there is a lot of room in between the two cases, and sticks are marked with a lot of cushion either way.

Don't over think this.
It's right in line with #2, but the motor is only very slightly inclined.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20181207_093530.jpg
Views:	46
Size:	155.4 KB
ID:	83296  
Delfin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2018, 02:00 PM   #74
Grand Vizier
 
Delfin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 3,457
[ATTACH]Attachment 83294[/ATTACH]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ski in NC View Post
They put an "engine running" set of marks on the stick as these engines are often used in continuous run applications where you may need to add oil and would rather not shut it down. You can add oil while it is running.

Nice feature, use it to your advantage. Note: Oil needs to be pretty much warmed up or you get a false reading.

If stick is near center of engine block (around cyl #3 and 4, the angle should not matter too much. Where is stick?

Oil level is not that critical. Can't be too low, can't be too high, but there is a lot of room in between the two cases, and sticks are marked with a lot of cushion either way.

Don't over think this.
It's right in line with #2, but the motor is only very slightly inclined.
Delfin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-21-2018, 07:02 PM   #75
Senior Member
 
City: MN and FL
Country: USA
Vessel Name: Serendipitous
Vessel Model: Mainship 390 and Bayliner 4788
Join Date: Feb 2013
Posts: 267
Need more info...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Coalman View Post
Anyone have a good fuel burn rate at cruise speed (say 8-9 knots) Cummins 6bta 5.9L M3 335 hp. Iím looking at economy. Not sure if this is the engine. Any help is appreciated

Diesel engines produces horsepower in proportion to the amount of fuel burned. Diesel engines (from any manufacturer) are notoriously reliable in converting fuel to horsepower.


That said, what remains is hull design, displacement, hydrodynamic drag etc.


Tell us about your boat. Fuel burn and cruise speed will be mostly independent of engine choice -- it's your boat and not your engine that will dictate what economy you will experience.
__________________
RiverGuy~~
Riverguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-22-2018, 07:00 AM   #76
FF
Guru
 
FF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 20,908
"it's your boat and not your engine that will dictate what economy you will experience."

Mostly its the speed you chose to operate your boat at.

At the Sq Rt of the waterline length most boats are cheap to operate , a K faster , perhaps 50% to 100% more fuel.
__________________

FF is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:33 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012
×