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Old 11-14-2020, 12:23 PM   #1
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The Power of a Surge

Last week I experienced something I have never before experienced. The ocean surge.

The entrance to Mazatlan Harbor is one such place. The entrance is very narrow and as a swell enters the entrance, half of the swell crashes on the rocks and the other half flows into the harbor.

Pairadice is tied to Marina El Sid, the surge affects this marina. As a swell enters the marina it pushes the water into the marina and moves all the boats back. As the swell moves back to sea, the water switches direction and moves out.

So the timing to enter the entrance is critical. A 45-60 ft sail boat mis-judged. As he entered the harbor, a swell caught him, causing the boat to "surf" the swell. This cause him to lose steering. He did not have enough power to back off and he crashed into the rocks snapping the mast off with the keel broke off. He was able to get off the boat before it rolled.

Took a crew with barrels to float it enough to get it to a dock.They worked for a couple of days and were able roll the SV upright.

I thought the currents of the PNW was bad.
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Old 11-15-2020, 04:13 PM   #2
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Jaysus. That's a bad day.
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Old 11-15-2020, 05:38 PM   #3
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Jaysus. That's a bad day.
Local knowledge???
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Old 11-16-2020, 11:47 AM   #4
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Local knowledge???
Yes if they would answer the VHF, which the locals do not.
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Old 11-16-2020, 12:38 PM   #5
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Have never used or even seen a Seabrake, but this scenario (broaching uncontrollably while surfing a wave) is exactly why they were invented:

https://www.sail-world.com/Australia...?source=google
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Old 11-16-2020, 12:39 PM   #6
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Wonder what kind of boat? Tangles with rocks are not predictable, but the keel breaking off should never happen on a well built sailboat, without complete destruction of the hull. It is happening more in the last 20 years as boats have become less well built.
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Old 11-16-2020, 12:50 PM   #7
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Wonder what kind of boat? Tangles with rocks are not predictable, but the keel breaking off should never happen on a well built sailboat, without complete destruction of the hull. It is happening more in the last 20 years as boats have become less well built.
If they broached at surfing speed and hit a rock...that would pack a serious wallop!
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Old 11-16-2020, 01:01 PM   #8
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I had one for my N46. 2 big bags. One for the rigging, the 2nd for the brake itself. I had the space to stow it on the N46. Never used it. Donated it to Chapman's school. The really appreciated the donation.
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Old 11-16-2020, 01:01 PM   #9
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Yes if they would answer the VHF, which the locals do not.
For money?
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Old 11-16-2020, 01:02 PM   #10
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I had one for my N46. 2 big bags. One for the rigging, the 2nd for the brake itself. I had the space to stow it on the N46. Never used it. Donated it to Chapman's school. The really appreciated the donation.
Was it a Seabrake, or a parachute anchor? Two entirely different beasts!
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Old 11-16-2020, 01:14 PM   #11
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Was it a Seabrake, or a parachute anchor? Two entirely different beasts!
brake, as mentioned in my answer.

In desperation, anything of size will assist. Not as great as an official brake. Of course if the real brake hangs up on the rocks, be prepared to cut it loose.
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Old 11-16-2020, 01:24 PM   #12
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brake, as mentioned in my answer.
Must have been a big one.

If I was to be crossing bars, think I'd find the room. (Runs at about 7' depth while boat is under power, so unlikely to hang up on rocks).
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Old 11-16-2020, 02:07 PM   #13
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Must have been a big one.

If I was to be crossing bars, think I'd find the room. (Runs at about 7' depth while boat is under power, so unlikely to hang up on rocks).
Oh yea, 2 BIG bags. The right size for the N46. If I tried to rig it on my 34ft, I think it would pull the cleats out. LOL
I'm not sure which is more trouble, deploying it or retrieving it.
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Old 11-16-2020, 02:40 PM   #14
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Oh yea, 2 BIG bags. The right size for the N46. If I tried to rig it on my 34ft, I think it would pull the cleats out. LOL
I'm not sure which is more trouble, deploying it or retrieving it.
A third option is possibly experiencing what the sailboat did
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Old 11-16-2020, 02:43 PM   #15
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Have never used or even seen a Seabrake, but this scenario (broaching uncontrollably while surfing a wave) is exactly why they were invented:

https://www.sail-world.com/Australia...?source=google

Not for the small skinny entrance.....
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Old 11-16-2020, 02:47 PM   #16
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Wonder what kind of boat?

Crusty may know. I had the impression it was a good boat.
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Old 11-16-2020, 03:06 PM   #17
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I had a sailboat and one thing on check list annually was the bolts that held the keel on. Check for corrosion or softness around them.What I saw was bolts with nuts over washers sufficient to hold the keel to the hull, BUT on reflection a hard hit could easily rip them through the glass bottom without I expect half the hull taken with it.
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Old 11-16-2020, 10:01 PM   #18
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I had a sailboat and one thing on check list annually was the bolts that held the keel on. Check for corrosion or softness around them.What I saw was bolts with nuts over washers sufficient to hold the keel to the hull, BUT on reflection a hard hit could easily rip them through the glass bottom without I expect half the hull taken with it.
When you look at the hull, its nice and clean. We guessed the SV was just put in the water from the hard. It hit hard.
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Old 11-16-2020, 10:18 PM   #19
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I had a sailboat and one thing on check list annually was the bolts that held the keel on. Check for corrosion or softness around them.What I saw was bolts with nuts over washers sufficient to hold the keel to the hull, BUT on reflection a hard hit could easily rip them through the glass bottom without I expect half the hull taken with it.
Too many sailboats built these days with detachable keels. "Tear along the dotted line." The ballast keel on a sailboat is not an optional or disposable item. No clear picture of the bottom on this one, but on many like it recently, keel cleanly detaches itself from the hull without much damage. This should not happen, rocks or no rocks. If the keel leaves without tearing a substantial bit of hull with it, the engineering was substandard.
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Old 11-20-2020, 07:06 PM   #20
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I have been in and out of that harbor several times on a Mason 53. It is no fun, especially since they often run a dredge that blocks much of the entrance. The cruising guides have good information on when it is safe. I can't see how any contraption could be deployed in that skinny twisted entrance. The best strategy is to come in at slack tide. There is an easy entrance harbor a few miles south to wait. I was in a hurry once. Won't do that again.
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