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Old 06-29-2018, 01:14 PM   #81
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I must admit, like the pilots of commercial aircraft I used to travel on, to having a limited take on the word 'pilot'. I opened the thread thinking it was about harbor pilots, this being a boating forum and all.
When I was traveling a lot as a delivery captain, I always flew using my title; captain. This usually got me an invite to the flight deck (way before the current security rules), as the flight crew just automatically assumed I was an aircraft pilot. Upon discovering otherwise, their interest in my profession usually kept the conversation going for the duration of the flight. Ah, those were the days!
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Old 06-29-2018, 02:01 PM   #82
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I've never flown an airplane that someone wasn't paying me to do it. First the Marines and then the airlines. It was a good life up until bankruptcy and the theft of our pension. We have had to reduce our expectations of retirement significantly. I've got five years to retirement. Already I am counting down how many recurrent sessions I have left. Then, I am out of here. The airline has beaten out most of my love of flying. They can have it.

Most of my sea experience is in sailing. I am mostly lurking and starting to educate myself before I get serious about shopping for a boat. The wife has the itch to do the Loop two or three times. I keep telling myself that it's so much cheaper to rent.

My plan is to only move in the daytime. Too many knuckleheads trying to run me over much less shallow water at night. My personal philosophy is to never get myself in a situation where I have to demonstrate my superior airmanship or seamanship.
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Old 06-29-2018, 02:41 PM   #83
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Centerline thrust on both or one engine. So if doing a multi engine endorsement, they are not valid to do your test in. Or at least they weren't many years ago. It is not like losing an engine in for example a Cheyenne or Navajo Chieftain.
I did my multi IFR in a Chieftain in 1990.
I've experienced an engine out in an Apache while flying IFR. My left leg would've had traded anything to have been in a Mixmaster. Fortunately it all ended well after an off-field landing. Any landing you can walk away from right?

That was 25+ years ago. Now I have a good story to tell and a whole lot more respect for Murphy.

I do miss flying from time to time, but boating more than fills up my need for fun, friends and adventure.
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Old 06-29-2018, 03:25 PM   #84
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My father gave up flying after his B-17 was shot down over Germany where he parachuted to prison camp.
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Old 06-29-2018, 03:49 PM   #85
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Skymasters - too heavy if you lose one engine

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I once met the fellow who started it and I asked him why the Sky Master. He said they wanted twins for flying over water and it was easier to get pilots trained for the Sky Master than conventional twins.
I was told that the Skymaster was too heavy to fly for long on one engine, and pretty much needed both to stay in the air.

My dad had one of the James Bond Piper Cherokee 140's and a Cessna 172 but my first wife didn't like small planes and that included Dad's planes...

I always wanted a Lake Buccaneer, but now would prefer an Icon A5, both are amphibious aircraft. I wonder how long it would take to do the loop in a Buccaneer?
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Old 06-29-2018, 04:11 PM   #86
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Got my license in 1960, Enjoyed flying all those years. Currently a Bonanza V35B. Getting close to hanging it up though.
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Old 06-29-2018, 04:50 PM   #87
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We meet lots of pilot-boaters. I think there's appeal, comfort, and expertise that aligns for these personalities . My father-in-law taught in links, flew a Stinson, built a Glasair, and spent 25 years cruising in a DeFever. My husband soloed on his 16th birthday, flew Navy F/A18 Hornets, an assortment for Delta, plus more, and has 1940s Piper Cub and Stinson.

As the wife of a pilot, my confidence in him to keep us safe on the water in our DeFever is bolstered by his flying skills. I know that weather, radar gauges, radio, equipment, navigation, controls, systems, electrical, and so much more, including driving big, awkward vehicles, are all second nature to him.
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Old 06-30-2018, 06:53 AM   #88
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flying decisions more timely

ok like the other pilots out there. Flying decisions are very timely since the world is going by fairly quickly. Boating decisions have slowed down to 8 knots, plenty of time to make mistakes and correct them. Over the past 40 + years in both boating and flying I've seen many pilots transition to sail or power. Just what we do. For you pilots, Part 135, 121, CFI, DPE ( over 5,000 Check rides)DC6 my favorite of the aircraft I've flown. Retired 2 years ago, haven't been in a tin can since.
Boating is much more relaxing and you can walk around when you need to stretch.
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Old 06-30-2018, 09:29 AM   #89
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I was told that the Skymaster was too heavy to fly for long on one engine, and pretty much needed both to stay in the air.
That's news to me as the manual states that the plane has an excellent single engine service ceiling. Never tried it myself though. Refer to post #62 for single engine performance specs.
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Old 06-30-2018, 09:48 AM   #90
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I enjoy boating night. Coming into a semi-busy harbor early in the morning recently I realized it was a lot like flying an IFR approach--the need to synthesize the data from a number of sources (MFD, radar, AIS, visual) and to keep your scan going.

I know there are a lot of sailors here. I suspect there are also a lot of pilots. Interesting how those two backgrounds overlap with the trawler world.

Anyone want to own up to being part of the flying community?

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I was a pilot in training before my health grounded me. I was building time being an aircraft fairy pilot. I would deliver aircraft around the southeast mostly. Did some midwest trips and a few Bahama trips. My hopes was to be a bush pilot out west around the Rockies. In my down time I was the aircraft repair tech's third hand and a line service tech. I did a lot of trades stuff prior and have certs in industrial mechanics and auto mechanics. I was almost talked into becoming a tech or avionics repairman. I just didn't like the thoughts of going back to school. Should have done it.
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Old 06-30-2018, 09:56 AM   #91
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I don't think it is just at night. It is any part of the operation of a boat. While the dynamics of operating a boat are different(some similar), the decision making process is the same. Like the wife of a pilot said above...we operate unwieldy large complex machines...a boat is no different in that regard. And it is the intake of data(conditions and threats, controllable or otherwise) and the processing of that data to make a decision. Many people get flustered on a boat when things aren't going their way. A good operator will know all potential outcomes based on the data present and have a plan for those outcomes based on the conditions. That is where pilots excel because that is what we do for a living.

So, IMO, yes, the decision making processes are similar regardless of the conditions.
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Old 07-01-2018, 12:54 PM   #92
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ok like the other pilots out there. Flying decisions are very timely since the world is going by fairly quickly. Boating decisions have slowed down to 8 knots, plenty of time to make mistakes and correct them. Over the past 40 + years in both boating and flying I've seen many pilots transition to sail or power. Just what we do. For you pilots, Part 135, 121, CFI, DPE ( over 5,000 Check rides)DC6 my favorite of the aircraft I've flown. Retired 2 years ago, haven't been in a tin can since.
Boating is much more relaxing and you can walk around when you need to stretch.
This is one thing I love about flying a 777 freighter.
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Old 07-01-2018, 11:06 PM   #93
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There is a danger mixing boating and flying. I bet every pilot can look at the picture and figure out why he crashed.
https://www.miamiherald.com/news/loc...ing_Newsletter
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Old 07-01-2018, 11:29 PM   #94
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There is a danger mixing boating and flying. I bet every pilot can look at the picture and figure out why he crashed.
https://www.miamiherald.com/news/loc....ng_Newsletter
Yup. Forgot where he was. "Gear down" is not always the correct answer.
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Old 07-01-2018, 11:29 PM   #95
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There is a danger mixing boating and flying. I bet every pilot can look at the picture and figure out why he crashed.
https://www.miamiherald.com/news/loc...ing_Newsletter
Gear down for a water landing. Classic example of doing something out of habbit without actually thinking of why you’re doing something.
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Old 07-02-2018, 01:38 AM   #96
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why crashed

Yep - less then 2 seconds of looking at picture we pilots all knew what he did.


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Old 07-02-2018, 02:06 AM   #97
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I've experienced an engine out in an Apache while flying IFR. My left leg would've had traded anything to have been in a Mixmaster. Fortunately it all ended well after an off-field landing. Any landing you can walk away from right?

That was 25+ years ago. Now I have a good story to tell and a whole lot more respect for Murphy.

I do miss flying from time to time, but boating more than fills up my need for fun, friends and adventure.
Thank you for sharing your story.
And I'm even more glad that you are still alive to tell it.
I lost power just after Vr in a Cheyenne once. Circled around safely and landed on one engine. Likely only a 3 minute flight, but felt like 20. I learned a lot that day, and did a bunch of reflecting after it was done. Even though I knew the right thing to do was continue on, it was tough to not pull the power and land straight ahead. The difference is at 500 feet the human mind says just go for it. Now I am a logical person most of the time, but at 5 feet, even my logical brain considered pulling the power for a split second. I've always had trouble seeing grey areas though, I am probably far too black or white in thought process. Maybe why I changed my field of study from Medical school to Law. The law is very black and white. Something is either legal or illegal, well most often anyway. Lawyers have a bad reputation I know. But I fight hard for what I believe in, and that is the law. Flying is a bit the same way, we are trained as pilots to do this or that. I actually like the structure of it, almost as much as the actual flying itself. And while I know many people hate me because of my profession, I enjoy being a lawyer for the same reason, structure and guidelines. The part where I excel is in being calm, cool, and logical. Panic is not something I am familiar with. It interests me when people get upset by say a near miss on their boat. Doesn't matter at all to me, missed by 6 inches, 6 feet, or 60 feet, a miss is a miss. If the two or more boats do not collide, who cares and move on.
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Old 07-02-2018, 02:16 AM   #98
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Fairy pilot

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I was a pilot in training before my health grounded me. I was building time being an aircraft fairy pilot. I would deliver aircraft around the southeast mostly. Did some midwest trips and a few Bahama trips. My hopes was to be a bush pilot out west around the Rockies. In my down time I was the aircraft repair tech's third hand and a line service tech. I did a lot of trades stuff prior and have certs in industrial mechanics and auto mechanics. I was almost talked into becoming a tech or avionics repairman. I just didn't like the thoughts of going back to school. Should have done it.
Ferry pilots move airplanes for someone else; Fairy pilots fly without airplanes
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Old 07-02-2018, 05:17 AM   #99
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"Ferry pilots move airplanes for someone else"

In the USN there are 2 squadrons of ferry pilots VRF31 east coast and VRF 32 , west coast.

The rules to ferry are very easy , an Open book exam and a couple of TO & landings.

I always wanted to fly the DC3 - C 47 , so read Da Book.

The most amazing procedure was a single engine Take OFF !!!

Didn't get to try one tho.
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Old 07-02-2018, 09:17 AM   #100
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There was a group here in Miami that had several Sky Masters. It was called Brothers to the Rescue. They would fly down toward Cuba to spot the rafts trying to get to the USA. They would then direct the Coast Guard or near by boats to pick them up.

I once met the fellow who started it and I asked him why the Sky Master. He said they wanted twins for flying over water and it was easier to get pilots trained for the Sky Master than conventional twins.

Unfortunately the Sky Master is no match for a Mig 29. Castro shot down two of them in international air space.
Not long after that, I was flying down around Cay Sal out of Marathon, taking shots of anchorages and finding Blue Holes. I still remember FSS saying "stay North of 24 deg Lat"; about 5 times during the briefing. I think I followed that advice, but hearing the Cuban approach control and having a fly-by from the Falcon jet with orange trim made these flights interesting. Oh, and the low lever 360's for photos too.

ps; in this same time frame, there were reports of beached raft survivors dying on elbow cay, etc down there.
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