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Old 05-14-2018, 07:08 AM   #41
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Originally Posted by psneeld View Post
Dockhands at marinas are so used to pulling boats to the dock, its hard to make it look easy because they just want to git'er done.

I try to manuever the boat to them and iften they yell at me to stop, one dockmaster threw me out of the marina when I told him it was my docking, not his.

On our winter trip, we often found dockhands that must have been deaf.

"Put this forward spring line on that cleat, please."

Dockhand takes line and stares at boat.

"Put that loop over that cleat, please."

Dockhand looks at cleat, no other moevment.

"PUT THAT LOOP ON THAT CLEAT RIGHT NOW, BOZO!!!!!!"

Sometimes dockhand begins to move a bit after that...



Quote:
Originally Posted by RickyD View Post
We had a double loaded slip...
This last trip was the first time we've been in a double-loaded slip with floating docks... and I found that a bit intimidating in a cross-wind with current issues.

I think it'd be easier after practicing if it were a home slip and we went in and out a lot, but the couple times in/couple times out at the marina where we were transients didn't give me a good feel for it yet...

-Chris
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Old 05-14-2018, 08:30 AM   #42
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The point I haven't seen mentioned regarding "strength" is handling the lines and fenders.


Wife handles the lines and fender while I am at the helm.


Over the years we have moved up in size, now with a 60's 70+K in weight.


The fenders have gotten larger. The lines are larger and longer.


She and I have discussed, would she be able to handle the lines and fenders for a larger boat?


To me, that's where the strength and agility come in. Was visiting with a retired friend recently (he has a 70 ft boat). They have gone to using a day captain because his wife is no long able to handle lines and fenders.


I agree, hands inside the boat. Your not going to manually pull a boat of that size to the dock.


Just my thoughts
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Old 05-14-2018, 09:41 AM   #43
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Originally Posted by FootballFan View Post
The point I haven't seen mentioned regarding "strength" is handling the lines and fenders.


Wife handles the lines and fender while I am at the helm.


Over the years we have moved up in size, now with a 60's 70+K in weight.


The fenders have gotten larger. The lines are larger and longer.


She and I have discussed, would she be able to handle the lines and fenders for a larger boat?


To me, that's where the strength and agility come in. Was visiting with a retired friend recently (he has a 70 ft boat). They have gone to using a day captain because his wife is no long able to handle lines and fenders.


I agree, hands inside the boat. Your not going to manually pull a boat of that size to the dock.


Just my thoughts
So why not teach the wife how to dock the boat?
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Old 05-14-2018, 10:16 AM   #44
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An excellent point that the captain should put the boat in the correct location. Line are for securing it there or further maneuvering such as springing.
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Old 05-14-2018, 10:17 AM   #45
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So why not teach the wife how to dock the boat?

Great idea. Now let's convince her.

She has come along way, I have confidence she will learn and get there - more confidence than she has.
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Old 05-14-2018, 10:23 AM   #46
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Every dock and boat is different but we have found that it is better to put fenders out after the boat is docked. Rub rails are there for a purpose.
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Old 05-14-2018, 01:12 PM   #47
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A 20 knot wind blowing off parallel docks means you only have a second or two before you need to be secure, or make the decision to be reversing out. Otherwise you'll will be blown into the boat next door.
And of course that 20 knot wind doesn't stop once you reverse out either. You can very quickly trade one set of problems for another, and this one you weren't setting up for.

It's very easy for experienced people to say "if you struggle with it, you must need more training" but conditions vary constantly so unless you keep a captain on board with you for the first 4 or 5 years, you're going to run into new situations. Or sometimes just make a bad decision. You have to accept that as part of the learning and move on, but it's definitely hard with a big audience, or relatives on board, or somebody's nice big shiny vessel accidentally involved.

The best we've been able to figure so far is take it as slow as we can, and abort our plans quickly as soon as we're struggling. More than once we've decided to spend a few hours in the wrong slip that was easier to get into than damage something getting into our own.
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Old 05-14-2018, 02:21 PM   #48
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Originally Posted by BDofMSP View Post
And of course that 20 knot wind doesn't stop once you reverse out either. You can very quickly trade one set of problems for another, and this one you weren't setting up for.
We have all been there.
If you're ever at a marina with plenty of empty berths on a windy day, use the opportunity to practice docking at various angles in the wind, but also practice aborting your docking attempt. Often this is done when in a panic when not thinking clearly. Do it in a planned manner, and the skills will develop much easier.

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The best we've been able to figure so far is take it as slow as we can, and abort our plans quickly as soon as we're struggling. More than once we've decided to spend a few hours in the wrong slip that was easier to get into than damage something getting into our own.
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Old 05-14-2018, 02:59 PM   #49
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With very minimal clearances, benign conditions are mandatory.
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Old 05-14-2018, 03:23 PM   #50
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Wifey B: If the slip don't flt, then you must split.

Sometimes it just can't reasonably and safely be done. Say so. Demand another slip or go to another marina. Normally as transients we get easy side ties but we've refused where dockmasters have tried to place us. Typically a location we could make it in, but if conditions weren't totally benign, we'd really have a problem exiting.
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Old 05-14-2018, 03:44 PM   #51
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With very minimal clearances, benign conditions are mandatory.
That is a certainly tight fit, Mark. You wouldn't want oversized fenders. What do you do on the non-benign days?

Luckily it appears you have a fairly direct run into your slip.
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Old 05-14-2018, 04:11 PM   #52
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Wifey B: For those of you who forgot the lines, what was your significant other doing? Shouldn't you be checking behind each other? Also do any of you use checklists which include the lines?
I have used checklists, but in this situation, it wasn't that I forget the lines, I forget about the extra, normally not used line on the bow. My wife didn't see it as her station is in the aft cockpit handling the stern lines. So in this case, a checklist wouldn't have helped. Checklists are great for things like remembering to disconnect the power cord before leaving the dock etc...
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Old 05-14-2018, 04:17 PM   #53
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This last trip was the first time we've been in a double-loaded slip with floating docks... and I found that a bit intimidating in a cross-wind with current issues.
I've never docked where a line needed to go around a piling. I wouldn't have the first clue. floating docks are all that you find here and double-loaded slips are common. Often transients are put in empty double-slips. You get used to what you are used to.
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Old 05-14-2018, 04:28 PM   #54
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Curious...when docking, how does one set up a spring line on bull rails?
Are you talking about using them to assist in docking when coming into a dock or tying off to them after you are in place? If the former, it is hard unless you have access to the end of the bull rail. Otherwise, I don't know a way.
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Old 05-14-2018, 04:32 PM   #55
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Originally Posted by bayview View Post
Every dock and boat is different but we have found that it is better to put fenders out after the boat is docked. Rub rails are there for a purpose.
Maybe if you are docking in situations where you are up against pilings. The rub rail on my boat does no good on floating docks. Also, even if you did some up against a piling here, you don't want the rub rail to get chewed up by all the barnacles and muscles that are attached to the piling.

As such, we always set fenders before coming into the dock and then adjust if we need to (normally don't need to). If we are going into one side of a double-wide slip, we put fenders on the opposite side as well to protect the boat next to us.
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Old 05-14-2018, 05:30 PM   #56
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I have used checklists, but in this situation, it wasn't that I forget the lines, I forget about the extra, normally not used line on the bow. My wife didn't see it as her station is in the aft cockpit handling the stern lines. So in this case, a checklist wouldn't have helped. Checklists are great for things like remembering to disconnect the power cord before leaving the dock etc...
Wifey B: And to check for all lines ...but still those things will happen.
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Old 05-14-2018, 05:57 PM   #57
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That is a certainly tight fit, Mark. You wouldn't want oversized fenders. What do you do on the non-benign days?

Luckily it appears you have a fairly direct run into your slip.
That's not my home berth. My berth is a single slip which is oversized for the boat.
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Old 05-14-2018, 06:00 PM   #58
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I've never docked where a line needed to go around a piling. I wouldn't have the first clue. floating docks are all that you find here and double-loaded slips are common. Often transients are put in empty double-slips. You get used to what you are used to.
With your boat I don't think you would have a bit of an issue putting a line around a piling. Boats with decks lower to the water is when it gets hard
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Old 05-14-2018, 06:19 PM   #59
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Pontoon boats and houseboats on pontoons (or very large ones with single engines) are still the most difficult docking I know. Ever spend time at a marina that rents one or both? So many people feel stupid not realizing that they're attempting what is the nearly impossible task for someone with their lack of experience.
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Old 05-14-2018, 07:35 PM   #60
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Are you talking about using them to assist in docking when coming into a dock or tying off to them after you are in place? If the former, it is hard unless you have access to the end of the bull rail. Otherwise, I don't know a way.
To assist in docking solo.

So far I’ve been able to get Badger to the dock, step off, tie the midship line to the bull rail, and get the bow & stern lines tied before either starts drifting too much.

AusCan gave some strategies a few posts ago for extra windy days
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