Go Back   Trawler Forum > Trawler Forum > General Discussion
Click Here to Login


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 11-15-2022, 09:59 AM   #1
Veteran Member
 
City: Corona Del Mar
Join Date: Nov 2022
Posts: 75
Need advice for appliances, gas or electric, if you had a choice

I am doing a refit of my boat. It is a 65' steel hull and superstructure. I am doing a complete refit.

For my kitchen, I have purchased a Gaggenau 400 series oven and a Samsung 30" induction cooktop. I also need to purchase a dryer. All three of these items are quite energy intensive.

I then went to Home Depot and saw a Samsung Bespoke range. So I began to wonder if perhaps I get that, and go to a gas dryer.

My question is should I stick with electric appliances or move to gas appliances for these three and put in an instant hot water heater as well using propane.

Currently, for hot water, I have 3 200kbtu heat exchangers connected to 3 of 4 engines with tiered thermostatic valves for scald protection (2 for propulsion, 2 for generators), and a 20 gallon electric hot water heater.

For eventual power, 1 generator 33kw, can use to power the entire boat, 1 generator 5.5kw to recharge the power bank, ~8.5kw of solar panels, and ~100kwh of battery power banks.

The gas (propane) would be for a range, an instant hot water heater, and a dryer. Fuel on the boat is diesel, with the exception of the dinghy and jet ski.

There is currently no propane systems onboard, nor was there ever. Electrical wires need to be ran.

Big energy hogs is the HVAC (10 tons), water maker, and scuba compressor.

Thank you
sndog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2022, 10:29 AM   #2
Guru
 
Pete Meisinger's Avatar
 
City: Oconto, WI
Vessel Name: Best Alternative
Vessel Model: 36 Albin Aft Cabin
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 2,594
Welcome Aboard sndog!

I love reading letters from people who obviously know what they are talking about, even if they are asking questions. We can tell by the quality of the questions that you know something about boats. We get a surprising number of newer members who start their post by saying something like. "I'm 27 years old and ready for a change, I bought a 40 foot wooden boat for $1,000 and it needs everything. We want to do the Loop next year. The engines are shot, and I would like to go electric, how many batteries will I need?" LOL

Personally, in your case I would go with propane. Although you will have plenty of genny capacity there is nothing like instant gas heat for cooking or hot water.(Also for drying clothes) .You have a perfect opportunity to make a super safe propane storage area on your steel boat. Just my humble opinion.

BTW, We (collectively) love lots of photos. You should be taking lots of photos anyway during you refit project, share them with us. Also tell us a little more about yourself.

Good Luck,

pete
Pete Meisinger is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2022, 11:03 AM   #3
Guru
 
mvweebles's Avatar
 
City: Saint Petersburg
Vessel Name: Weebles
Vessel Model: 1970 Willard 36 Trawler
Join Date: Mar 2019
Posts: 5,170
I'll go counter to Pete M.

Your boat sounds energy intensive so not sure how much yoy can gain by introrucimg another fuel source. I didn't see much in your description about HVAC and refrigeration, but unless you can take your generator offline for significant periods, not sure you'll gain much and may increase hassle factor with propane.

I can't say as I recall seeing a gas dryer on a boat. No reason not too, just don't recall seeing one.

Where I definitely agree with Pete M is this needs pictures. A little boat-porn please.

Peter
__________________
M/V Weebles
1970 Willard 36 Sedan Trawler
mvweebles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2022, 11:20 AM   #4
Valued Technical Contributor
 
DavidM's Avatar
 
City: Litchfield, Ct
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 6,475
I would stick with electricity. In addition to the slight risks of having three propane fueled appliances on board, you will have at least two vents: dryer and hot water heater that you do not have now. Where are you going to terminate them. Well I do understand that most electric dryers have vents but not all.

Cost wise given that you will have to get 20# tanks filled (somewhere) it won't be much cheaper to run the appliances on diesel generated power particularly if it is incremental power.

And if you decide to use propane, know that ABYC recommends individual hoses all the way from the propane source to the appliance. In other words, you shouldn't tee off inside the boat.

David
DavidM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2022, 11:27 AM   #5
Guru
 
City: West coast
Join Date: Aug 2021
Posts: 1,012
Can induction burners be run off inverters or do they need the genset running?
bowball is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2022, 11:50 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
Circumnavigator's Avatar
 
City: West Newbury.
Vessel Name: Morning Light
Vessel Model: Webbers Cove 42 Trawler
Join Date: Oct 2020
Posts: 270
Fintry is all electric. Morning Light and Sweetwater have gas ranges, but electric hot water and dryer. All three had engine heat for hot water as well. That worked well enough so that we simply turned off the electricity to the water heater when not on shore power.



Fintry was all 120/240 except for wheelhouse instruments, so we ran a generator or 10kW of inverter all the time when off shore power.


I have serious safety problems with gas hot water. Propane is a risk on a boat, but I'm OK with it on the range -- you turn it on at the tank with the remote solenoid and sniffer system that's beside the range, do your cooking, and turn it off. I would be much less comfortable having it on all the time for instant hot water. With the range, the cook is right there and can see if the the burner is on. With hot water, no one is there and the gas is on 24/7. Sure, there's a safety if the burner doesn't light, but I like the double safety of having someone there.



Also, as I said above, if you have a heat exchanger in the hot water heater, you won't need electricity at all when off shore power. Gas instant hot water cannot, of course, use waste engine heat. Fintry's 50 gallon Torrid hot water heater actually has two heat exchangers - one for generator waste heat and one for heat from the HVAC boiler.



A dryer is in between, but I favor electric. Actually we have the Splendide washer dryer in one unit and I don't think you can do that it gas.


Jim


Sweetwater -- Swan 57 sloop on which we circumnavigated 1995-98
Fintry -- x Royal Navy Fleet Tender -- owned 2003-2022, 20,000 miles including trans-Atlantic - The Fleet Tender Fintry

Morning Light -- Webbers Cove 42 single screw trawler 2021- ?
Circumnavigator is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2022, 12:19 PM   #7
Veteran Member
 
City: Corona Del Mar
Join Date: Nov 2022
Posts: 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete Meisinger View Post
Welcome Aboard sndog!

I love reading letters from people who obviously know what they are talking about, even if they are asking questions. We can tell by the quality of the questions that you know something about boats. We get a surprising number of newer members who start their post by saying something like. "I'm 27 years old and ready for a change, I bought a 40 foot wooden boat for $1,000 and it needs everything. We want to do the Loop next year. The engines are shot, and I would like to go electric, how many batteries will I need?" LOL

Personally, in your case I would go with propane. Although you will have plenty of genny capacity there is nothing like instant gas heat for cooking or hot water.(Also for drying clothes) .You have a perfect opportunity to make a super safe propane storage area on your steel boat. Just my humble opinion.

BTW, We (collectively) love lots of photos. You should be taking lots of photos anyway during you refit project, share them with us. Also tell us a little more about yourself.

Good Luck,

pete

Thank you for the compliments and the information.

About me, I bought a 52' little harbor in St Maarten in Feb 2021 and spent 8 months refitting and took it to Florida. It was a beautiful boat and I loved it, but ultimately did not fit my application or needs. So I purchased a 65' dutch built steel boat. Will be extending it out 5' with a swim platform with hydraulic rams. Will be taking it from TX to California when the majority of the refit is complete.


What I learned on the last trip is that genny is expensive to use, as I like to travel in comfort (AC). So this trip, though the generation capacity is large, I would ultimately like to avoid using it as much as possible. Hence the solar, battery storage, and even items like my ac are in 6 zones with 6 different units so I can close doors to conserve a lot of power.

I was definitely going all electric, hence my purchases, but then saw the samsung bespoke range and thought it looked great, so now I am debating it, especially when I priced out the Victron inverter gear to handle an additional 12kw of energy conversion.
sndog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2022, 01:00 PM   #8
Veteran Member
 
City: Corona Del Mar
Join Date: Nov 2022
Posts: 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by mvweebles View Post
I'll go counter to Pete M.

Your boat sounds energy intensive so not sure how much yoy can gain by introrucimg another fuel source. I didn't see much in your description about HVAC and refrigeration, but unless you can take your generator offline for significant periods, not sure you'll gain much and may increase hassle factor with propane.

I can't say as I recall seeing a gas dryer on a boat. No reason not too, just don't recall seeing one.

Where I definitely agree with Pete M is this needs pictures. A little boat-porn please.

Peter
The boat is definitely energy intensive, no clue on how to share photos yet. It has 10 tons of AC (3 24k BTU units and 3 18k BTU units), water maker, hot water heater, scuba compressor, full size fridge, 2 ice makers, 2 chest freezers, washer, dryer, 3 large screen tvs, IT gear (3 wifi APs, KVH H7 HTS, Starlink, Peplink HD2 with sim injector, Peplink BR2 with access marine 2m antenna, wilson wifi amplifier, TMO home hotspot, 2 pairs of Devialet Phantom Gold speakers, a few switchs, router, firewall),Microwave, Anova Sous Vide oven, office with multiple monitors and gear and a Cisco Virtual Presence machine. Plus standard stuff like lighting, outlets, etc.

According to my rough energy audit I calculated energy usage ( with electric appliances and water heater) to be about 65kwh a day with no AC, and with AC to be about 150kwh a day.

The biggest difference I am looking at is peak electrical loads. with items like AC will be constant, adding in additional reserve capacity to handle the 3 appliances is large. As the cooktop requires a maximum of ~8kw, ~5.5kw, and dryer ~6.5kw. So, I need to really oversize, or make sure only one is running at a time. Hence my look now at switching to gas.

And that is why I am posting to this forum.

All the electric appliances are purchased, but not yet installed.
sndog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2022, 01:01 PM   #9
Veteran Member
 
City: Corona Del Mar
Join Date: Nov 2022
Posts: 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavidM View Post
I would stick with electricity. In addition to the slight risks of having three propane fueled appliances on board, you will have at least two vents: dryer and hot water heater that you do not have now. Where are you going to terminate them. Well I do understand that most electric dryers have vents but not all.

Cost wise given that you will have to get 20# tanks filled (somewhere) it won't be much cheaper to run the appliances on diesel generated power particularly if it is incremental power.

And if you decide to use propane, know that ABYC recommends individual hoses all the way from the propane source to the appliance. In other words, you shouldn't tee off inside the boat.

David
Thank you for the info. I did read that ABYC requires no T-s. Which is not a big deal at all. As well as shutoff valves.
sndog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2022, 01:02 PM   #10
Veteran Member
 
City: Corona Del Mar
Join Date: Nov 2022
Posts: 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by bowball View Post
Can induction burners be run off inverters or do they need the genset running?
It can run off the inverter, at least according to Victron. Samsung would not provide an answer.
sndog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2022, 01:15 PM   #11
Veteran Member
 
City: Corona Del Mar
Join Date: Nov 2022
Posts: 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Circumnavigator View Post
Fintry is all electric. Morning Light and Sweetwater have gas ranges, but electric hot water and dryer. All three had engine heat for hot water as well. That worked well enough so that we simply turned off the electricity to the water heater when not on shore power.



Fintry was all 120/240 except for wheelhouse instruments, so we ran a generator or 10kW of inverter all the time when off shore power.


I have serious safety problems with gas hot water. Propane is a risk on a boat, but I'm OK with it on the range -- you turn it on at the tank with the remote solenoid and sniffer system that's beside the range, do your cooking, and turn it off. I would be much less comfortable having it on all the time for instant hot water. With the range, the cook is right there and can see if the the burner is on. With hot water, no one is there and the gas is on 24/7. Sure, there's a safety if the burner doesn't light, but I like the double safety of having someone there.



Also, as I said above, if you have a heat exchanger in the hot water heater, you won't need electricity at all when off shore power. Gas instant hot water cannot, of course, use waste engine heat. Fintry's 50 gallon Torrid hot water heater actually has two heat exchangers - one for generator waste heat and one for heat from the HVAC boiler.



A dryer is in between, but I favor electric. Actually we have the Splendide washer dryer in one unit and I don't think you can do that it gas.


Jim


Sweetwater -- Swan 57 sloop on which we circumnavigated 1995-98
Fintry -- x Royal Navy Fleet Tender -- owned 2003-2022, 20,000 miles including trans-Atlantic - The Fleet Tender Fintry

Morning Light -- Webbers Cove 42 single screw trawler 2021- ?
Thank you for the info as well. The instant hot water heater was looking to put outside, not in the engine room. Was thinking of a small one, just in case, as it is easy to plumb in as all of my systems go to a pex manifold to control water input, then out to two different pex manifolds for everything else.

Seems like a gas dryer may not be a good idea. I have the samsung heat pump one already, but was debating.

Range and oven are energy hogs, which is what brought me here for this discussion.

I was also working on PLC logic for my breaker panel to limit which appliances were on/off to keep the energy from exceeding capacity.
sndog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2022, 01:16 PM   #12
Senior Member
 
City: Cairns
Join Date: Jul 2019
Posts: 493
A couple of things you don't mention that would help giving meaningful information. How will the vessel be used? Marina to marina or off shore passages. What are your plans for inverter sizing? Run light loads only with genset power for larger loads or ability to run 100% silent?

Generally I would prefer electric over gas. Much easier to refill esp at unfamiliar ports, possibly with different tanks and fittings. An all gas vessel will require big and heavy storage tanks. Do you have the physical strength, cranage, dinghy etc to handle these? Induction hotplates add minimal heat and moisture to the galley vs gas. Both can be installed safely but electric has less risk.

Gensets can be expensive to run in terms of fuel, spares inventory, noise and downright inconvenience especially when run at light loads. With 100kwh of battery bank you have the capacity to power all loads via inverter(s) and use the generators to recharge at full efficiency when ever it suits you. Obviously this will be supplemented with your large solar panels providing essentially free power. Not relying on genset to power items directly also allows all items to be wired as single or split phase avoiding drastically unbalanced loads on a 3 phase genset.

Victron, while very good units, are not the only brand available. There are many residential or industrial brands that also perform well.
GoneDiving is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2022, 01:31 PM   #13
Veteran Member
 
City: Corona Del Mar
Join Date: Nov 2022
Posts: 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoneDiving View Post
A couple of things you don't mention that would help giving meaningful information. How will the vessel be used? Marina to marina or off shore passages. What are your plans for inverter sizing? Run light loads only with genset power for larger loads or ability to run 100% silent?

Generally I would prefer electric over gas. Much easier to refill esp at unfamiliar ports, possibly with different tanks and fittings. An all gas vessel will require big and heavy storage tanks. Do you have the physical strength, cranage, dinghy etc to handle these? Induction hotplates add minimal heat and moisture to the galley vs gas. Both can be installed safely but electric has less risk.

Gensets can be expensive to run in terms of fuel, spares inventory, noise and downright inconvenience especially when run at light loads. With 100kwh of battery bank you have the capacity to power all loads via inverter(s) and use the generators to recharge at full efficiency when ever it suits you. Obviously this will be supplemented with your large solar panels providing essentially free power. Not relying on genset to power items directly also allows all items to be wired as single or split phase avoiding drastically unbalanced loads on a 3 phase genset.

Victron, while very good units, are not the only brand available. There are many residential or industrial brands that also perform well.
I would be open to other brands as well, as Victron is a bit pricey for the KW needed. As I would like to have 15 to 18kw of capacity from the inverter loads.

Usage will be a long passage from TX to the West Coast. From there. Most passages will be Long Beach to Catalina, or similar.

THe issue I am debating is, is it worth the additional cost in inverter capacity to be able to run them together, or to go to gas. Energy usage is not terrible overall of them, as it adds about 8kwh a day of energy usage, but the cost is to get the capacity to run items like the cooktop and oven at the same time. It takes me from 15 to 18kw of inverter to 25 to 30kw of inverter.
sndog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2022, 01:44 PM   #14
Veteran Member
 
City: Corona Del Mar
Join Date: Nov 2022
Posts: 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by GoneDiving View Post
A couple of things you don't mention that would help giving meaningful information. How will the vessel be used? Marina to marina or off shore passages. What are your plans for inverter sizing? Run light loads only with genset power for larger loads or ability to run 100% silent?

Generally I would prefer electric over gas. Much easier to refill esp at unfamiliar ports, possibly with different tanks and fittings. An all gas vessel will require big and heavy storage tanks. Do you have the physical strength, cranage, dinghy etc to handle these? Induction hotplates add minimal heat and moisture to the galley vs gas. Both can be installed safely but electric has less risk.

Gensets can be expensive to run in terms of fuel, spares inventory, noise and downright inconvenience especially when run at light loads. With 100kwh of battery bank you have the capacity to power all loads via inverter(s) and use the generators to recharge at full efficiency when ever it suits you. Obviously this will be supplemented with your large solar panels providing essentially free power. Not relying on genset to power items directly also allows all items to be wired as single or split phase avoiding drastically unbalanced loads on a 3 phase genset.

Victron, while very good units, are not the only brand available. There are many residential or industrial brands that also perform well.
What brands would you also recommend for inverter
sndog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2022, 02:27 PM   #15
Guru
 
City: Newport, R.I.
Vessel Name: Hippocampus
Vessel Model: Nordic Tug 42
Join Date: Jul 2020
Posts: 2,820
Have always had gas for cooking. Even with modern induction believe turn a flame up or down is the easiest way to control temperature as our brains can correlate flame to temperature intuitively. That said many of the pros have switched to induction. The house is all Wolf/subzero. Now they say that gas ranges are a significant contributor to indoor pollution and some states are moving to outlaw new gas appliances in new construction. Still personally like propane for the cooktop. However boats have another wrinkle. That’s getting propane. Big tanks are heavy and in many places it was chore to find a refill station. So if starting out would do induction cook top and electric convection oven on a boat. You have enough capacity to make that work.
Also have a Splendide which is vented. Inspite of that it dries poorly compared to a home machine and can’t really do bedding. Even with it end up going to the laundromat. Yes it’s convenient to make those trips more infrequently. However if I had the bucks, space and available energy would put in Speed Queen. We have that in the house and it’s the best we ever had. Short of house washer/dryers wouldn’t worry much about a splendide as a draw. Just do it when genset is on for another reason or you’re plugged in.
Don’t use much AC and didn’t even in the tropics. Find it’s necessary in the low winds,high humidity you see in a marina but not other settings. So more likely to be necessary when plugged in. Then issue becomes getting a sufficient load on the genset when you are out of the marina setting and want AC.
Unfortunately every time I’ve done a energy audit it’s been wrong. You can never fully figure out how frequently and for how long you will use things until you’ve lived with them for awhile. Neither can you figure out what combination of things will be on at the same time. Yes you can make a real good guess at minimum draw underway and maximum underway or at rest but not average. Nor range of draw per any 24h period of time. Some days or weeks it’s quite high others low. Friends with FeLiPO say it’s a game changer as they can cruise never worrying about getting to 100% nor going too low. This impacts on genset time even with solar onboard. Before spending more boat bucks would decide if you’re going to stay with AGM. That decision would impact all your other decisions.
Hippocampus is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2022, 03:29 PM   #16
Senior Member
 
City: Cairns
Join Date: Jul 2019
Posts: 493
Quote:
Originally Posted by sndog View Post
What brands would you also recommend for inverter
I'm Australian and not terrible familiar with the US market. Personally I went with Korean MPP Solar units 2*5000w. The main thing is to ensure that they have programmable or selectable Earth/Neutral bridges otherwise you may not be able to connect to Shore power.

Will Prowse videos on YouTube can be a little over the top but he does road test numerous inverter setups, many designed for the US market.

18kw is 2 or 3 inverters, depending on model selected, as is 30kw. Given this, and the size of the overall electrical upgrade, I don't see the marginal cost as huge. I do see a lot of benefits in having a single platform and being able to run the genset if and when I want. But those are only my priorities. Yours may be different. I'm good at spending other people's money. 🙂
GoneDiving is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2022, 03:30 PM   #17
Senior Member
 
Delta Riverat's Avatar
 
City: Stockton
Vessel Name: Dream Catcher
Vessel Model: 1979 Island Gypsy 44 Flush Aft Deck
Join Date: Feb 2022
Posts: 308
I would keep it all electric too. Induction is as good as gas and it's clean easy and fast. Just need induction cookware.

The outdoor shower I would have no problem with a 20# propane powered system.
Delta Riverat is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2022, 04:23 PM   #18
Veteran Member
 
City: Corona Del Mar
Join Date: Nov 2022
Posts: 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hippocampus View Post
Have always had gas for cooking. Even with modern induction believe turn a flame up or down is the easiest way to control temperature as our brains can correlate flame to temperature intuitively. That said many of the pros have switched to induction. The house is all Wolf/subzero. Now they say that gas ranges are a significant contributor to indoor pollution and some states are moving to outlaw new gas appliances in new construction. Still personally like propane for the cooktop. However boats have another wrinkle. Thatís getting propane. Big tanks are heavy and in many places it was chore to find a refill station. So if starting out would do induction cook top and electric convection oven on a boat. You have enough capacity to make that work.
Also have a Splendide which is vented. Inspite of that it dries poorly compared to a home machine and canít really do bedding. Even with it end up going to the laundromat. Yes itís convenient to make those trips more infrequently. However if I had the bucks, space and available energy would put in Speed Queen. We have that in the house and itís the best we ever had. Short of house washer/dryers wouldnít worry much about a splendide as a draw. Just do it when genset is on for another reason or youíre plugged in.
Donít use much AC and didnít even in the tropics. Find itís necessary in the low winds,high humidity you see in a marina but not other settings. So more likely to be necessary when plugged in. Then issue becomes getting a sufficient load on the genset when you are out of the marina setting and want AC.
Unfortunately every time Iíve done a energy audit itís been wrong. You can never fully figure out how frequently and for how long you will use things until youíve lived with them for awhile. Neither can you figure out what combination of things will be on at the same time. Yes you can make a real good guess at minimum draw underway and maximum underway or at rest but not average. Nor range of draw per any 24h period of time. Some days or weeks itís quite high others low. Friends with FeLiPO say itís a game changer as they can cruise never worrying about getting to 100% nor going too low. This impacts on genset time even with solar onboard. Before spending more boat bucks would decide if youíre going to stay with AGM. That decision would impact all your other decisions.
My last boat I went from St. Maarten to Ft Lauderdale. We took two months as we enjoyed stopping and staying. We did find out that AC was necessary in order to be comfortable given the large windows onboard. My new boat has larger windows. So as much as I hate to run AC, it will, unfortunately, be necessary.

Batteries are lithium, so the power is there. Engine start batteries though are remaining as AGM.

Running the dryer just at the Marina is not a bad idea actually at all. As our longest offshore passage is from Dominican Republic to Bonaire. Well, unless I can pull off 3 to 4 miles to the gallon and starlink works as it should, then it may be a pit stop in the Galapagos, but other than that, not long passages. Cruise speed for my boat is 14 kts, but I intend to keep it maybe 7 to 8 kts for fuel efficiency.
sndog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2022, 04:25 PM   #19
Veteran Member
 
City: Corona Del Mar
Join Date: Nov 2022
Posts: 75
sndog is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2022, 05:56 PM   #20
Guru
 
tiltrider1's Avatar
 
City: Seattle
Vessel Name: AZZURRA
Vessel Model: Ocean Alexander 54
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 3,536
I have no issues with propane done correctly. However, if you can get by with out adding propane to the boat that is a plus. If you can cook with out a generator then I wouldn't add propane.

I added propane because the wife demands gas for cooking and I hate running the generator for cooking.

With laundry, you do that once a week and I wouldn't normally find some one cooking and doing laundry at the same time. If on the hook you will need to charge batteries at some point and doing laundry at the same time is no big deal.

Your instant hot water is the biggest challenge and only you know how important this is.
tiltrider1 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


» Trawler Port Captains
Port Captains are TF volunteers who can serve as local guides or assist with local arrangements and information. Search below to locate Port Captains near your destination. To learn more about this program read here: TF Port Captain Program





All times are GMT -5. The time now is 01:27 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2023, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO 3.6.0
Copyright 2006 - 2012