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Old 08-02-2017, 11:38 PM   #21
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Welcome aboard.
We went from a Sailboat to a Trawler, no regrets yet.
I also had a Hunter 375 back in the mid 90's. On second thought, I do miss sailing that boat.
Don't we all old (now feeble) sailors feel the same?
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Old 08-03-2017, 06:18 AM   #22
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Dear All:
My name is Jim and I have been sailing for about 40 years. However, I plan to retire soon (my partner is already retired) and sailing is becoming too strenuous for me, as I have multiple back issues. I plan to switch to a trawler, as I do not have a desire to spend a fortune on fuel and I enjoy the comfort a trawler can provide Most likely between 31' to 34' ( max 36'). I plan to purchase a slightly used boat but may consider a new boat (I like to new 31' Ranger). I plan on using the boat as a retirement home and taking it from New York to Florida during the winter for a month or so (visiting many friends who have purchased homes in Florida). Therefore, I am interested in those boaters who have either Ranger 31' or Nordic tugs 34' for their reasons why you choose the particular boat you now own. And, your positive and negatives about your experiences with your trawler/tug. Thank you for your input. It's a difficult decision giving up my sailboat (38').
In addition, I plan to attend Trawlerfest this September 2017 in Maryland. Has anyone ever attending the seminars? Especially the boat handling seminar.
1. Speed costs. Usually faster will burn more fuel overall. With prices between $2-3 a gallon, not bad but if it shoots back up, speed will be felt at the fuel dock.

2. Even 36 foot trawlers barely have enough storage for a 2 month trip, let alone retirement home (full time for sure). Its the nicknacks, memorabilia and hobby interests that overwhelm the last nooks and crannies. If you have fishing gear, snorkeling gear, etc...takes up a lot of storage room on a boat as you know. Trawlers may have more than sailboats, but not till you get into bigger ones. I live on a 40 footer with someone and wish I had bought the 43 or something near 45....but different designs help as a 42 Kadey Krogen is massive compared to my 40 Albin.

3. NY to FL for a month or two? Not sure what that means..... I live in South Jersey and it was almost a struggle to get to FL and back and have time to enjoy anything in less than 4 months cruising. Even now at 6 months gone, it barely seems more relaxed, but nice to spend some weeks in one or two spots. At 6.3 knots, my trawlers comfy speed, it was 400 driving hours to FT Pierce, FL.....and another 100 to make it to the upper Keys and back.

4. If traveling in late October through April, you will probably want a diesel heating system or 2 gensets for heat redundancy, unless you like camping and good sleeping bags. Also a buss heater for the pilothouse area during travelling times.

5. I would spend the money for a few more feet and upgrades of a used boat than buying new. New boats can have a lot of problems for the first couple years, and if you start snowbirding right away, having those problems in some stretches of the ICW might be OK because of great repair facilities, other stretches, not so good. When on the road it can get expensive if you are stranded in some areas.
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Old 08-03-2017, 07:01 AM   #23
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...
5. I would spend the money for a few more feet and upgrades of a used boat than buying new. New boats can have a lot of problems for the first couple years, and if you start snowbirding right away, having those problems in some stretches of the ICW might be OK because of great repair facilities, other stretches, not so good. When on the road it can get expensive if you are stranded in some areas.
Paul is correct when he says that new boats take some time to get sorted out but... the idea that a used boat will somehow have fewer issues than a new boat is up for debate. I believe it depends on the boat in question. I'd bet that I could board any boat of about 40' and find something wrong or not working correctly, new or used. I always have a list of items that need attention and that list begins from the day we take delivery but aside from the "new boat shakedown" my list always grows in length as the boat ages.
Having taken delivery of 2 decent quality new boats in our lives, the shake down was pretty tame. Certainly, our Tug has had far fewer issues than our previous sailboat but all issues on each boat were easy to find and repair.
Maybe our experience is unusual as 2 boats is not exactly statistically significant but even allowing for a period of shaking out of issues, a new boat is still new with systems that have few hours and wear.
The other nice thing about beginning new is that I find it easier to maintain something than it is to restore something. From gelcoat to vinyl, from engines to pumps, a little attention can extend the life of a system or thing. I prefer to keep my stuff in nice shape and by beginning new it is far easier to control the process.
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Old 08-03-2017, 07:49 AM   #24
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I havent had the fortunate experience to buy new since the 70s.

But I have been towing brand new boats quite a bit lately. Just one last night. And some of these boats get towed multiple times.

Thats just engine and drive train related issues.

I agree it is the boat, certainly a little used boat not well maintained is not going to be fun either.

My point was, new is certainly no guarantee that it is cruise ready. Another plus for a used boat is that many cruising type upgrades may have already been made....again in the right boat.
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Old 08-03-2017, 08:56 AM   #25
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HIn the 34 foot range built in the last few years, the AT, Beneteau, and Mainship must be close to the top for space, but for a live-aboard it would be a shame not to consider good conditioned vessels built after the milenium. The space king for any production or semi-production boat under 38 is the incomparable Great Harbour N or GH series. At 36 it would be the Krogen Manatee, but the latest model was built in '91. I'd have to throw in the Endeavour 36 powercat as the post 2000 living space winner with honorable mention to the Selene 36. The only recent 35 would be the Sea Horse "Coot", and at 34 I'd probably add another powercat option, the PDQ 34, which offers speed, economy and surprising space as well. Good luck in your search.

The Great Harbor 37 offers a huge amount of space for a live aboard and other than air draft, might be a very good option for a boat destined for the Loop. Their are very few of them out West, but I was really interested the GH37.
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Old 08-03-2017, 11:08 AM   #26
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We've purchased new and had virtually no issues but we very carefully selected builders and we had all surveyed prior to acceptance and a couple of minor things addressed immediately upon survey. Amazing how quickly things get done when they're holding up a final payment. Seems someone gets on it the same day. Also, we've gone through significant shakedown cruises on all new boats before taking off on a long distance cruise. Bruce B did the same. So, my keys for minimizing new boat issues:

1. Select the right builder
2. Survey (or at least sea trial and very careful inspection before acceptance)
3. Shakedown cruise

We put 58 hours on our loop boat before starting the loop. Other shakedowns have been 48 hours and 85 hours.

Also, never accept a boat on the premise of bringing it back at some later date to get the issue fixed.
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Old 08-03-2017, 12:35 PM   #27
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Don't we all old (now feeble) sailors feel the same?
I'm sure we all do.
I see that you can actually carry some sail and maybe do a little motor sailing.
My trawler has a mast and boom but no sail, ....yet.
My advice to any ex-sailor is to get a trawler with at least a couple of winches and sheets to play with when you get bored.
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Old 08-03-2017, 01:30 PM   #28
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I'm sure we all do.
I see that you can actually carry some sail and maybe do a little motor sailing.
My trawler has a mast and boom but no sail, ....yet.
My advice to any ex-sailor is to get a trawler with at least a couple of winches and sheets to play with when you get bored.
My advice is keep sailing friends and take them occasionally and go with them occasionally, or a sailing dinghy or small sail boat or charter a few times a year.

Now, we're not big sailors. However, with a power boat we can go a lot of places and then occasionally sail in some of the most beautiful areas possible. We've sailed from Fort Lauderdale, Annapolis, Newport, San Francisco, Cancun, Cabo San Lucas, the US Virgin Islands, St. Maarten, Key West, Cape Cod, and Grand Cayman in the last five years. We try to sail two to three times a year but turns out closer to twice. Perhaps we need to go sailing soon.
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Old 08-03-2017, 01:51 PM   #29
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I'm sure we all do.
I see that you can actually carry some sail and maybe do a little motor sailing.
My trawler has a mast and boom but no sail, ....yet.
My advice to any ex-sailor is to get a trawler with at least a couple of winches and sheets to play with when you get bored.
I keep a high performance sailing dinghy ready to go on a trailer at home to satisfy the itch. Unfortunately it hasn't seen much use lately as I've been traveling far from home on the power boat during sailing season. Every now and again I plot and scheme on how I could carry my sailboat on the power boat, but I haven't yet come up with a workable solution. Not going to give up the RIB, and really no space for a second small boat.
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Old 08-03-2017, 08:57 PM   #30
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When we sold our Catalina 30 and bought our Ocean Alexander trawler, we also bought a 25ft Santana sport boat to keep our hand in sailing. We knew that a sailboat big enough to be a comfortable live aboard would be more than we could handle as a couple, however, we didn't want to give up our dream either. Slowly but surely it's taking shape for us, take your time, it will for you too!
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Old 09-09-2017, 06:00 PM   #31
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Sail to trawler

Mt wife and I sold our Beneteau 423 sailboat and purchased a Cherubini Independence 50a trawler. The primary decision maker was that the secret of sailboaters is one motors a lot. So, we concluded why not motor a bit more comfortably. Indeed, sailboats are romantic and capture a vision of exploration. But unless one intends to cross oceans I for one prefer trawlers.
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Old 09-09-2017, 08:25 PM   #32
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We too sold our B 423 in the spring of2016 and bought an Ocean Alexander 456.
I love to sail, but for cruising love tbe comfort of our boat.

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Old 09-09-2017, 11:16 PM   #33
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We too sold our B 423 in the spring of2016 and bought an Ocean Alexander 456.
I love to sail, but for cruising love tbe comfort of our boat.
I never get tired of hearing these stories! When I'm outside San Diego Bay, most sail boats I see are motoring.
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Old 09-09-2017, 11:33 PM   #34
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That's a shame: I'm in San Diego now, waiting for a November departure south. Great sailing wind here every day.
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