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Old 09-22-2022, 02:45 PM   #1
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Medical kit

Iím sure this has been asked before, but what would you include in a high end medical kit for cruising in more remote areas?

Are there any ones already made that are recommended?

Include a defilabrator?
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Old 09-22-2022, 03:00 PM   #2
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I think a lot would depend on your medical skill level. An EMT or Doctor is going to have a more sophisticated kit than someone with no medical training.
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Old 09-22-2022, 04:08 PM   #3
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We had a Trans-Ocean Medical Sea Pak (soft case) for 10 years and used it. The burn and the laceration kit were worth the cost alone. They also make a coastal kit which may work for you. Lena and I had both taken advanced first aid and other classes. We had a doctor who helped us with the prescription list which included lidocaine, Ringer's solution and pain meds. Even in the Bahamas, medical care can be a day plus away.

Notes: Prescription for pain meds are difficult to renew or secure outside the US. We lived in Seattle and took classes such as “suturing at sea”. The commercial fishing fleet base helped with classes and doctors. You need to keep your prescriptions current. Not necessarily to the US guidelines regarding their shelf life but use yours or your Dr’s judgment. Antibiotics have a shorter shelf life in the heat.

The med kit is like your life raft. You hope you never need it.

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Old 09-22-2022, 06:06 PM   #4
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The short answer to part of your question is yes...there are commercial medical kits of all sizes and sophistication. A quick Google search should give you plenty of ideas. And as has already been said, the complexity of your medical kit may in fact depend on your level of expertise and training. Perhaps more important then the kit is the training (which may dictate the kit). If going to a remote area consider taking a Wilderness First Aid (16 hours) or Wilderness First Responder (40 hrs) course. These are specifically aimed at activities where calling 911 is not an option and even more then skills teach a way to look at a medical/trauma incident in a remote area. There are also marine-focused medical courses (for example: https://www.wildmed.com/course-type/...ency-medicine/). Once you get the training, then deciding on what you are comfortable with in a medical kit becomes easier. Another thought, most vessels need more than one medical kit. Consider that having a basic first aid kit for the minor cuts and scrapes is useful so one doesn't need to dig into the main (and larger) kit; similarly a first aid kit on your tender or dinghy is a good idea.

Finally you ask about a defibrillator (AED). While an AED can play a major role in someone surviving some types of cardiac arrests, consider that if you are in a remote area you may lack access to the advanced medical care required to continue that recovery. There is a decent discussion of AEDs on boats at: https://www.aedleader.com/best-aed-for-boat/ (no endorsement intended!).
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Old 09-22-2022, 06:45 PM   #5
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We have an ER doc in the family who puts together our med kit. Items perhaps not on the usual list include a skin/surgical stapler and zofran (requires an rx).
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Old 09-22-2022, 08:07 PM   #6
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I keep a ZOLL defibrillator on board with child and adult pads. Not only to batteries need to be changes but also the pad. The pads get old and lose their 'sticky'.
Based on my observation, the existing "prepared" medical kits spend a lot of space on bandaids and gauze. A versatile 'drug' is aspirin. Those places that sell the large kits also hold classes. Consider taking the classroom courses. If out to sea or near shore, you have a question, they offer the ability to talk to doctors and/or nurses.
The kit (large) I have is currently in my store room and intended to go on voyages only. Gotta keep it readily available in a dry area. You need to learn how to immobilize broken bones and compound fracture.
Dont forget to get a few large packs of the 'magic powder" to stop bleed. Learn how to properly to use a tourniquet.
Learn how to close wound.
Of course CPR. I would think one of the oxygen generator is of some value too.
So many things to learn and the time to learn it is before you need. You need to learn far more than basic First Aid.

I keep a smaller kit on board too.
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Old 09-22-2022, 10:04 PM   #7
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Royal Sydney Yacht Squadron would fail you on your sailboat racing safety inspection if your kit lacked several safety pins. One owner, a neurosurgeon, figured they were for maintaining dress standards in case you tore your shirt.
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Old 09-23-2022, 01:59 AM   #8
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Regardless of the kit you choose consider if you have enough large bandages to change a dressing daily for a few days. If someone gets a bad injury in the morning and you patch them up they may need a fresh dressing before bed and once again when they wake up the next morning. So 3 dressing changes and you are only on the start of day two. Burns can consume a lot of bandages, you may need 2 or 3 large bandages to cover a burn. A couple changes and a burn can quickly run you out of bandages. I would also want a dental kit and something good for flushing out an eye. Most of the big kits should have a SAM splint or something similar to support a sprain or break.
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Old 09-23-2022, 06:59 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RedRascal View Post
Regardless of the kit you choose consider if you would, I would also want a dental kit and something good for flushing out an eye. Most of the big kits should have a SAM splint or something similar to support a sprain or break.
When I looked at the SAM splint then, remembered, I was taught to support the break above and below the break. Did they change that recommdation
I have seen air inflated splints too.

https://first-aid-product.com/first-...r-splints.html
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