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Old 05-17-2022, 09:14 PM   #1
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Low Tide

-3.3 tide today in LaConner, WA, yep she’s on the bottom. -3.5 tomorrow so we’ve moved to deeper waters this evening.

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Old 05-18-2022, 04:07 PM   #2
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Low Tide

Hope it’s soft mud under there!

Nice boat.
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Old 05-18-2022, 07:18 PM   #3
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That's really low water! Any word on traffic past Goat Island, that has become a concern.

I'm still on the hard in the yard, labor & weather constraints delaying splash date another week.
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Old 05-18-2022, 08:37 PM   #4
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That's really low water! Any word on traffic past Goat Island, that has become a concern.

I'm still on the hard in the yard, labor & weather constraints delaying splash date another week.


Going to be a -4 middle of June!
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Old 05-18-2022, 08:46 PM   #5
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It’s been very low tides last few days here in Sidney BC.
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Old 05-18-2022, 09:39 PM   #6
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Time to "test the engine" in the slip tied up in both directions for a about an hour. Water in my home slip was chest deep I high tide until I spent a few hours with both props ahead 1200 RPM facing in and then out. It was a good "test" resulting in ten feet depth at high tide.
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Old 05-18-2022, 10:32 PM   #7
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We were exiting the south end of the Swinomish channel a few years ago on a tide that low. Suddenly we had just a couple feet under the keel. At first I though my son had wandered out of the channel but both range markers and GPS showed us dead center. We only draw 3' so total depth was only 5. Guess it hadn't been dredged.
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Old 05-19-2022, 12:18 AM   #8
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I would be wary of running engines in mud because the mud could clog up the cooling system….
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Old 05-19-2022, 06:44 AM   #9
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I would be wary of running engines in mud because the mud could clog up the cooling system….

Agreed. I'd only try to blow a slip out if there's enough current to prevent the stirred up mud from getting pulled back into the cooling intakes.
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Old 05-19-2022, 09:23 AM   #10
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I would be wary of running engines in mud because the mud could clog up the cooling system….
Fisheries frown on that practice, as the mud is habitat that you are removing without a permit.
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Old 05-19-2022, 09:45 AM   #11
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With the negative tides this summer things should get real busy for TowboatU.S.

Here is the latest official word:

WASHINGTON – STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA TO STRAIT OF GEORGIA – SWINOMISH CHANNEL SOUTH ENTRANCE – Shoaling (Revised from LNM 14/22) Significant shoaling exists in Swinomish Channel, especially the South Entrance between South Entrance Buoy 5 (LLNR 18802) and South Entrance Daybeacon 12 (LLNR 18812). The project depth of Swinomish Channel is 12 feet, however, the controlling depth of Swinomish Channel is 4.1 feet based upon the latest available hydrographic data. This controlling depth of 4.1 feet is reflected on NOAA ENC products. Raster products do not reflect this sounding information, as they are no longer being updated with most routine corrections. Mariners should consult ENC cells for the most up-to-date information. Mariners should transit the Swinomish Channel waterway with caution, especially at low tidal conditions.
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Old 05-19-2022, 10:30 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NWSeadog View Post
With the negative tides this summer things should get real busy for TowboatU.S.

Here is the latest official word:

WASHINGTON – STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA TO STRAIT OF GEORGIA – SWINOMISH CHANNEL SOUTH ENTRANCE – Shoaling (Revised from LNM 14/22) Significant shoaling exists in Swinomish Channel, especially the South Entrance between South Entrance Buoy 5 (LLNR 18802) and South Entrance Daybeacon 12 (LLNR 18812). The project depth of Swinomish Channel is 12 feet, however, the controlling depth of Swinomish Channel is 4.1 feet based upon the latest available hydrographic data. This controlling depth of 4.1 feet is reflected on NOAA ENC products. Raster products do not reflect this sounding information, as they are no longer being updated with most routine corrections. Mariners should consult ENC cells for the most up-to-date information. Mariners should transit the Swinomish Channel waterway with caution, especially at low tidal conditions.
good post. that is a significant amount of shoaling to be sure. when they say controlling depth, they are indicating mean low water, right? in certain tides it would be almost drying.
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Old 05-19-2022, 10:34 AM   #13
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Aqua Map has the Corps of Engineers (ACE) survey data available as a chart overlay, and it is very interesting -- not only for the narrow channel at South end but also a couple of substantial bars into the middle of the channel farther north. My takeaway is to look for tide that is at least (your draft) - 2.5 feet, and watch sonar (of course).

BTW the last time I went by there, we saw a beautiful 60 foot sailboat approaching the south entrance. The admiral commented on how they might have gone all over the world. I said I thought they were cutting the corner between the first 2 green buoys.

30 minutes later we heard a call on channel 16 that they were grounded. (And 2 hours later a call that they were underway again.)
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Old 05-23-2022, 12:53 PM   #14
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Quote:
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Fisheries frown on that practice, as the mud is habitat that you are removing without a permit.

Hi Mr. Oliver:

Things must be a little different here on the Gulf of Mexico, state of Florida, compared to up there in the Pacific NW. I've used boat motors for forty years to blow the sand out of my own private slip AND my family's former marina slips. Yes, dredging requires a permit, but not regular maintenance.

Mr. Gano's boat dock is located in a small bay off the Gulf. The prime fisheries areas start about 50 miles offshore.

Mr. Gano is also one of the most conscientious boaters on TF, and would never endanger fisheries, wetlands, manatees, birds or anything else in the environment with any of his his boat-related activities.

Additionally, when I finish moving the sand out of my slip, I just run the boat out into the Gulf for an hour and that cleans out anything my intake strainers encountered. I've used both inboards and outboards, and never had any problems with my motors (or my neighbors, or Fish & Wildlife).

Cheers,
Mrs. Trombley
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Old 05-23-2022, 02:06 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rgano View Post
Time to "test the engine" in the slip tied up in both directions for a about an hour. Water in my home slip was chest deep I high tide until I spent a few hours with both props ahead 1200 RPM facing in and then out. It was a good "test" resulting in ten feet depth at high tide.
Prolonged "prop dredging" can have unintended consequences, for the raw water impellers and other plumbing, as well as for the surrounding bottom contour. As far as I know, it has been illegal in Florida for decades, though plenty of boaters have gotten away with it.
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